Canon Model 7 instruction booklet from 1962

There’s not many opportunities to find an original Canon Model 7 instruction booklet in Japanese here in the US, but one did pop up on an auction site recently so I added it to my collection.
The date code printed on the bottom center of the back cover (1162) is the date that this booklet was printed. In this case November 1962 which is about a year and a half after the camera was first released.

The back cover (top) translates as – Canon Camera Co., Ltd., Headquarters Factory Shimomaruko-cho, Ota-ku, Tokyo and their sales office at 7-1 Ginza, Chuo-ku, Tokyo (Yamato Building, 3rd Floor).

Here’s a scan from inside the booklet showing how to properly hold the camera. I might mention that any translations come directly from my Google translation app on my phone.
The English Edition of the same booklet but printed in 1966.

Thanks for stopping by and have a great day and please, be safe!

Comments are always welcomed as I’ve learned quite a bit from reader feedback. As always, thanks for stopping by and while you’re at it, feel free to visit my camera shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com (CC Design Studios hosted by Etsy). – Chris Whelan

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris, Chasing Classic Cameras with Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2021 Chasing Classic Cameras with Chris (Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic), Chris Whelan
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Canon Model 7 Instruction Booklet – 1968

I was rather surprised to find such a late date booklet for the original Canon 7 35mm rangefinder camera (August 1968) since the camera went out of production in 1964. The Canon Model 7s was in full production during this period (it followed the Model 7 with only slight improvements).

A scan of the front cover and inside back cover from the booklet. Canon didn’t feature their 50mm f/0.95 lens in this edition.
A scan of the back cover – take note of the 08/68 date code (bottom center). Again the f/1.4 lens is featured.

I haven’t had the opportunity to use my Model 7 yet as I’ve been super busy with a refresh of my kitchen (paint, new floors, and new cabinets) but I hope to soon. Here in Florida COVID-19 the Delta variant is running rampant so the thought of a walkabout with the camera is on hold for now. I’m vaccinated but apparently not many of my fellow Floridians and tourists are (https://covid.cdc.gov/covid-data-tracker/#county-view). What a shame as the local hospitals are nearly full with sick unvaccinated people.

Thanks for stopping by and be safe.

Comments are always welcomed as I’ve learned quite a bit from reader feedback. As always, thanks for stopping by and while you’re at it, feel free to visit my camera shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com (CC Design Studios hosted by Etsy). – Chris Whelan

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris, Chasing Classic Cameras with Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2021 Chasing Classic Cameras with Chris (Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic), Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

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It’s just a box

Chasing boxes — sounds pretty lame and it is in the big picture of collecting classic and vintage cameras but a camera box from the early 1960s can be either a rat or a gem after all these years. They’re just colorful cardboard with some stickers here and there after all and cardboard doesn’t do well if stored improperly. Moisture, bugs, sunlight, heat, pollution and crushing are just a few of the nasty things that can degrade 40, 50, and 60 year-old cardboard.

So, knowing all of the things that are stacked against finding a collectible camera box I’m happy to say that this one is a pleasant surprise. It’s far from perfect but it’s still very nice (no not so funny smells either).

My best guess is that this box was made in late 1962 based on the serial number of the camera that’s written on the bottom of the box.
Originally the area that’s blacked out said 50mm f1.4 lens but a previous owner carelessly modified the box when the body was separated from the lens when sold.
Here’s the camera that came with the box (a nice bonus). The box is nice because the camera is in near mint condition and is fully functional. The Canon Model 7 accepts LTM screw-in lenses from Canon, Nikon, Fuji, Leica, and a bunch of others. The bayonet part around the opening was designed to accept Canon’s ‘dream lens’ the 50mm f/0.95 which you can discover more about it at https://global.canon/en/c-museum/product/s43.html

So there you have it… another aspect to collecting classic film cameras, collecting the boxes that went with them. Most people dispose of the camera box right after they took their new camera out of the box (I’m guilty) and some left the original box at the camera shop when they took their camera home (not guilty).

A scan from a Canon Product Catalog from March 1967 (the Canon 7S had already been released). Note the ‘dream lens’ is affixed in this catalog’s image.

Comments are always welcomed as I’ve learned quite a bit from reader feedback. As always, thanks for stopping by and while you’re at it, feel free to visit my camera shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com (CC Design Studios hosted by Etsy). – Chris Whelan

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris, Chasing Classic Cameras with Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2021 Chasing Classic Cameras with Chris (Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic), Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

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Chasing the Canon Model 7

Being a fan of most of Canon’s cameras and lenses it was only a matter of time before I started chasing after the Model 7. Although this model was released while the world was catching the SLR craze, it stood out as one of the best rangefinders Canon had produced up to that point. It also served notice to Nikon and Leica that Canon was a serious competitor capable of building outstanding cameras and lenses. Here’s my Canon 7.

Lots to like about this Canon.
Super bright and accurate view-rangefinder (Leica M challenger).
Dual range selenium cell light meter that’s still very much active and hopefully still accurate.

I haven’t decided on a lens for it yet but I’m looking for a nice 50mm f1.4 lens that would have a serial number in the range of this body. From what I can tell, this camera left the factory with a lens in the range of 114000 to 116000. The chase is on!

I’ll post additional updates on this camera as I get the original box and case “in the studio” for some glamour shots. I’m also chasing after the appropriate instruction booklet for it in either English or Japanese (or both), a brochure, and of course, the proper lens. For now, my trusty Nikkor fits nicely.

A Nikkor lens on a Canon!

Comments are always welcomed as I’ve learned quite a bit from reader feedback. As always, thanks for stopping by and while you’re at it, feel free to visit my camera shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com (CC Design Studios hosted by Etsy). – Chris Whelan

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris, Chasing Classic Cameras with Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2021 Chasing Classic Cameras with Chris (Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic), Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

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