SUNday Spotlight – Chasing Classic Cameras – Leica Bits!

Part of the fun of collecting cameras is discovering something you didn’t know existed. In this case, I recently discovered that Leica Leitz made lens cases out of Bakelite (ancient plastic) that held various Leica lenses in the late 1940s and early 1950s (reportedly as early as the mid-1930s).

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The case is designed to hold the lens securely with a small notch for the focus knob.

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There are small numbers embossed in the base, 2729, and on the cap 2617. These numbers do not show up currently on a search of Leica catalog numbers.

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The outside of the base of the Bakelite case.

leica french case codes

‘BCDOO’ was the Leica catalog code for the Bakelite lens case for the 3.5cm Summaron. The translation of the French is “Bakelite boxes with screw-thread cover for…”.

leica french lens info

Apparently, at some point in time (I don’t know the date of this catalog) these Bakelite cases were offered with the lenses as either a standard accessory or available as a separate option.

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A small sample of the Bakelite cases.

Thanks for stopping by and here’s hoping you have a beautiful day and that you’re about to discover something neat in your camera collection! – Chris

By the way, my camera shop is always open at http://www.ccstudio2380.com so feel free to pop on over.

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2020 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

 

SUNday Spotlight – Chasing Classic Cameras – Arco Colinar Lens

From 1952, a little known Japanese lens maker produced this super nice Leica screw mount telephoto lens. The Arco Colinar 13.5cm f/3.8 short telephoto.

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It was one of the first lenses produced by this start-up company. The serial number, No. 27559 gives a clue as to when it was made. The ’27’ is the Showa year and when converted to our Western calendar is 1952 (27 + 25 = 52). The remaining numbers would indicate the number made up to that point. In this case, it is the 559th made.

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I believe it is a chromed brass bodied lens as it weighs 615 grams. Lots of brass and glass in a small package.

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Test image from about 10 feet at f/11.

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Test image from about 15 feet at f/11.

The lens is designed for 35mm rangefinder cameras that use the Leica LTM/L39 screw mount – Leica, Nicca, Canon, Leotax to name just a few.

The lens was mounted on my Fujifilm X-A10 mirrorless digital camera using a Fotodiox M39-FX adapter. I’m very happy with the performance of this classic and a rather rare lens that’s still going strong after 68 years of service.

Thanks for stopping by and have a beautiful day! – Chris

Be sure to visit my camera shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com – lots of new old stuff added this week – check it out.

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2020 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

 

Chasing Classic Cameras – Nicca 3-S

Nicca 3-S 35mm rangefinder camera from the mid-1950s. Here it’s mated with a rather rare Nippon Kogaku W-Nikkor C 28mm f/3.5 wide-angle lens and matching Nippon Kogaku optical 2.8 viewfinder.

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The Nicca is a solid camera in its own right. Many call this type of camera a Leica copy or clone but I prefer to say it was inspired by Leica’s design.

Thanks for stopping by and have a beautiful day! – Chris

My camera shop can be visited at http://www.ccstudio2380.com

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2020 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

Chasing Classic Cameras with Chris – hello Miranda!

Here’s a seldom-seen “system camera” from Miranda first released in 1965. The Miranda G was a one-hit-wonder and was quickly replaced with metered models. I think it was called the Miranda GT when a metered pentaprism was added.

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Exploded view of the Miranda G. Up to three viewfinders were available for use in the system.

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A fast Auto Miranda wide-angle lens (made by Soligor?) – f/2.8 2.8cm

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A focal-plane shutter with speeds from bulb to 1/1000 second.

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There are 8 different focusing screens available for this model.

This beast weighs in at 877 grams as pictured minus film and batteries. Wait, there’s no batteries as this is the meterless prism. Time to break out your hand-held meter because this is basic photography 101 – pure analog.

I wanted to post an advertisement from around 1965 or so with the Miranda G but I couldn’t find any. The G is rather uncommon in any condition.

This wonderful classic is available in my camera shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com

Thanks for stopping by and stay safe! – Chris

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2020 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.