Chasing Classic Cameras 2020

2020 was a pretty dynamic year as far as our camera collection was concerned. Lots of outgoing cameras and lenses and a few (well more than a few) additions. Here’s my top 6 new members of the hoard.

An eclectic mix of cameras presented in no particular order.

Canon EOS-1N RS. The Superman of Canon’s 35mm SLR film cameras. This one is from about 1998. The high-speed motor drive is built-in and at its fastest its capable of shooting 10 fps! Here it has a gorgeous Canon EF AF 50mm f1.4 USM lens mounted.
Zeiss Ikon Contax IIIa from 1951 is a 35mm interchangeable lens rangefinder film camera. A fully operational Contax IIIa from early 1951. Here it’s pictured with the exposure meter flap in the closed position. The Carl Zeiss Sonnar f/1.5 50mm lens is in excellent condition as is the camera. Even the exposure meter is working!
The last in the long line of Leica L39 (LSM) interchangeable lens rangefinder cameras. This is the famous Leica IIIg with the Leicavit winder attached. The lens is a wonderful and sharp Ernst Leitz Summaron f3.5 35mm wide-angle lens.
I didn’t need to add this full-frame monster to my collection but when the opportunity came along to own it I couldn’t pass. At 36 MP it will laser etch your eyes with it’s resolution. Here it’s got a sharp AF Nikkor 50mm f1.4 lens. The only downside to this camera is no built-in image stabilization so you need a tripod (at least I do) for any shot with a lens over 135mm.
My favorite Yashica hands down. This classic 35mm SLR film camera is in mint condition and came with its original box. From May 1970.
Yashica-Nicca YF – August 1959. Mated with a sharp Yashinon f1.8 5cm lens. This Yashica is a 35mm interchangeable lens film camera that uses L39 (LSM) lenses.

Believe it or not but there’s a few more not listed here. I’ll blog about those soon. There were many more outgoing cameras in our collection in 2020 which is always a good thing. You can’t keep them all.

Thanks for stopping by and a big thanks to all of my new followers that joined the blog in 2020. Also a very big thanks to all of my followers since day one back in 2015. I couldn’t have ever imagined over 700 followers in my wildest dreams. Thanks!!! – Chris

Be sure to stop by my camera shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2021 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

Saturday Spotlight – My favorite RF

Whenever I reminisce about classic cameras from the 1950s it’s hard not to think of this Nicca camera inspired by the iconic Leica 35mm rangefinder (RF).

* Nicca 3-S from 1954 *

By today’s standards there’s nothing easy about using a camera from this era. Some of the “negatives” – manual focusing using a rangefinder (not thru the lens like an SLR), manual exposure and shutter speed settings, difficult film loading, and lots of add-ons just to be able to shoot with a wide angle or telephoto lens to name just a few. The positives – this is considered to be a miniature camera (compared to other film cameras), interchangeable lenses, rugged construction, excellent lens choices, and portability. I like this camera because it just feels right cradled in your hand.

Tiny 2.8cm (28mm) wide angle lens made by Nippon Kogaku (Nikkor-Nikon).
Optical viewfinder that provided the correct angle of view of the 2.8cm lens.
Nippon Kogaku W-Nikkor.C f3.5 2.8cm lens.
Optical viewfinder mounted on the Nicca’s accessory shoe.

If you want to experience film photography in its purest form then check out one of these amazing machines from the 1950s. Leica, Nicca, Yashica, Canon, Nikon, Leotax, and dozens more.

Totally random here but I wanted to give a shout out to my friend Peggy’s WordPress site at https://cameragocamera.com/ It’s a lot of fun to visit and she’s tested nearly every camera on the planet (almost) nearly every camera. Pop on over for a read and be sure to click follow while you’re there.

Thanks for stopping by and have a safe and beautiful day! – Chris

Be sure to stop by my camera shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2020 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

Canon EOS-1N RS Box

I know, this isn’t an exciting topic but when you collect classic cameras some of the fun is finding them with their original boxes too.

Here’s the outer box for the Canon EOS-1N Rs from about 1995.

And here’s a few boxes from a few years ago that I thought I had lost the SD card that they were on.

Canon A-1 from 1980
Canon AE-1 Program from 1982 (for the 1984 Olympics)
Yashica J-5 from around 1964

Thanks for stopping by and have a great day! – Chris

Canon T-70 from 1982

Be sure to stop by my camera shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2020 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

Canon EOS-1N RS

A classic from Canon released in 1995.

One of the last 35mm SLR film cameras made by Canon. Their was another model, an update of this one released in 2000. What made the EOS-1N RS so special is its ability to accurately take up to 10 fps and still keep autofocus and auto exposure. It has a fixed, semi-transparent pellicle mirror.

Thanks for stopping by and have a fantastic Friday! – Chris

Be sure to stop by my camera shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2020 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

High-Speed Film Eaters from Canon

The original Canon F-1 35mm SLR film camera was capable of up to 3.5 frames per second (fps) when mated with the Canon Motor Drive MF (shown below left). My F-1 is from 1978 and at that time I didn’t purchase the motor drive. The drive was added within the last 5 or so years. The Canon EOS-1N RS (lower right) is the latest addition to my Canon collection and although I haven’t run a roll of film through it yet I have no reason to doubt that it’s fully operational.

The motor drive on the F-1 is removable thereby saving the extra weight of carrying it around when its not needed. The motor drive on the EOS-1N RS is built-in so there’s no option to save a bit of weight. The EOS weighs in at 1,476 grams which is 3 lbs 4 oz with batteries installed (8 AA) but without film and without a lens.
The Canon EOS-1N RS in all its glory. With its fixed, semi-transparent pellicle mirror the RS is capable of shooting film at up to 10 fps! A fun way to eat through a roll of 36 exposures in under 4 seconds!

Since the pellicle mirror doesn’t move when shooting the 10 fps with quick and accurate autofocus and auto exposure can be achieved. I can’t imagine ever holding the shutter button down to eat up 10 exposures in a second but who knows, it’s nice to think that I’ll someday use it if needed.

The two cameras are about the same width and height but they differ greatly in bulk.

I’m still up in the air as to which EF AF lens I want to get. I do know that as I’ve aged my ability to hold a steady shot has diminished so the lens will have to have image stabilization.

Canon’s EF 24–105mm f/3.5–5.6 IS STM lens is at the top of my wishlist as it falls within what most people would call the normal range for 35mm photography.

$599.99 new. I’ll have to save up a bit to get this one.

Thanks for stopping by. I would recommend looking at the Canon EOS-1N RS or Canon EOS-1V which is a bit newer ( I think 2000). I would say that these cameras represent the best (most sophisticated) film cameras that Canon made just before going digital. The good news is that the EOS-1N RS is not all that expensive via online auction sites, in fact it’s quite a bit less expensive than the EOS-1V which in some cases goes for double the cost of the RS. Have a great day and if you own this camera please drop me a comment about what your impression with the camera has been. – Chris

Be sure to stop by my camera shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2020 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

Chasing Classic Cameras -Nikon U2 – end of the line Nikon 35mm SLR

Also known as the Nikon N75 in North America and the F75 everywhere else outside of Japan. It’s a sophisticated autofocus and auto exposure 35mm film camera that uses almost all of Nikon’s F mount lenses.

Original list price in 2003. It’s actually a very expensive film camera in it’s day. At about 110 JPY to USD puts it in the high $500 range.

This particular camera had the date time display option so technically it would be the Nikon U2 QD.

I’ll have this wonderful available in my camera shop very soon. You can visit my shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com

Here’s a fun little contest brochure that was included with my camera.

Thanks for stopping by! – Chris

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2020 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

late entry

As Saturday becomes Sunday I’ve decided to tease a post I’ll actually finish tomorrow (my Sunday). Nearly 100 years old and counting (the camera not the post).

Rather rare movie camera from 1925 gets a new home. For more please visit my online camera shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com

Thanks, Chris

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2020 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

SUNday Spotlight – Chasing Classic Cameras – Leica Bits!

Part of the fun of collecting cameras is discovering something you didn’t know existed. In this case, I recently discovered that Leica Leitz made lens cases out of Bakelite (ancient plastic) that held various Leica lenses in the late 1940s and early 1950s (reportedly as early as the mid-1930s).

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The case is designed to hold the lens securely with a small notch for the focus knob.

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There are small numbers embossed in the base, 2729, and on the cap 2617. These numbers do not show up currently on a search of Leica catalog numbers.

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The outside of the base of the Bakelite case.

leica french case codes

‘BCDOO’ was the Leica catalog code for the Bakelite lens case for the 3.5cm Summaron. The translation of the French is “Bakelite boxes with screw-thread cover for…”.

leica french lens info

Apparently, at some point in time (I don’t know the date of this catalog) these Bakelite cases were offered with the lenses as either a standard accessory or available as a separate option.

leica bakelite cases

A small sample of the Bakelite cases.

Thanks for stopping by and here’s hoping you have a beautiful day and that you’re about to discover something neat in your camera collection! – Chris

By the way, my camera shop is always open at http://www.ccstudio2380.com so feel free to pop on over.

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2020 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

 

SUNday Spotlight – Chasing Classic Cameras – Arco Colinar Lens

From 1952, a little known Japanese lens maker produced this super nice Leica screw mount telephoto lens. The Arco Colinar 13.5cm f/3.8 short telephoto.

DSCF2163 (1)

It was one of the first lenses produced by this start-up company. The serial number, No. 27559 gives a clue as to when it was made. The ’27’ is the Showa year and when converted to our Western calendar is 1952 (27 + 25 = 52). The remaining numbers would indicate the number made up to that point. In this case, it is the 559th made.

DSCF2169

I believe it is a chromed brass bodied lens as it weighs 615 grams. Lots of brass and glass in a small package.

DSCF2171

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Test image from about 10 feet at f/11.

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Test image from about 15 feet at f/11.

The lens is designed for 35mm rangefinder cameras that use the Leica LTM/L39 screw mount – Leica, Nicca, Canon, Leotax to name just a few.

The lens was mounted on my Fujifilm X-A10 mirrorless digital camera using a Fotodiox M39-FX adapter. I’m very happy with the performance of this classic and a rather rare lens that’s still going strong after 68 years of service.

Thanks for stopping by and have a beautiful day! – Chris

Be sure to visit my camera shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com – lots of new old stuff added this week – check it out.

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2020 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

 

Chasing Classic Cameras – Nicca 3-S

Nicca 3-S 35mm rangefinder camera from the mid-1950s. Here it’s mated with a rather rare Nippon Kogaku W-Nikkor C 28mm f/3.5 wide-angle lens and matching Nippon Kogaku optical 2.8 viewfinder.

nicca 3-s logo

The Nicca is a solid camera in its own right. Many call this type of camera a Leica copy or clone but I prefer to say it was inspired by Leica’s design.

Thanks for stopping by and have a beautiful day! – Chris

My camera shop can be visited at http://www.ccstudio2380.com

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2020 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.