the nightmare continues

Heartbroken and heartsick

Plane Spotting – Cessna Citation Longitude

Textron Aviation 700 (2021) shortly after takeoff from the Fernandina Beach Municipal Airport (KFHB).
Cessna Citation Longitude

Camera and Lens – Canon EOS R with Canon RF 70-200mm f4

Thanks for stopping by! – Chris

Comments are always welcomed as I’ve learned quite a bit from reader feedback. As always, thanks for stopping by, and while you’re at it, feel free to visit my camera shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com (CC Design Studios hosted by Etsy). – Chris Whelan

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, is this blog’s property and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris, Chasing Classic Cameras with Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2022 Chasing Classic Cameras with Chris (Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic), Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

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Yashica TL Electro X ITS – Integrated Technology System

I still feel pretty confident that ‘ITS’ is meant to be ‘Integrated Technology System’ but Yashica may not have been that specific and the marketing people just liked the way ‘ITS’ looked.

Chasing Classic Cameras with Chris

Have you ever wondered what the ‘ITS’ stood for? For most people, probably not – but if you’re a Yashica Fanatic probably yes.

Yas TLITS LOGO Yashica TL Electro X ITS from 1973

IMG_20191226_0003 Undated sales brochure for the TL Electro X ITS. By the way, the marketing people had the name ‘Tomioka’ removed from this cover image of the lens – it’s the big empty space on the left side of the lens ring.

After years (yes, years) of searching almost everything Yashica published I’ve come to the conclusion that the intent of the marketing behind this camera was to promote Yashica’s first real system 35mm SLR. No, it doesn’t have an interchangeable back or viewfinder like the Canon F-1 and the Nikon F, but it did have a host of quality lenses and accessories. Oh, and no motor drive.

So ‘ITS’ most likely means ‘Integrated Technology System’ since the TL Electro X…

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1909 VDB Lincoln Cent

Lincoln never looked so good. At 113 years old this coin has aged very well and has toned beautifully. It’s in uncirculated condition and I’d say that I’ve owned it for some thirty years or so. The coin was minted at the Philadelphia Mint in 1909 (obviously) and the designer’s initials are on the reverse bottom center of the coin – V.D.B. is Victor D. Brenner. The coin was issued on the occasion of President Lincoln’s 100th birthday. The initials caused quite a stir at the time with many feeling they were too prominent on a US coin. They were quickly removed that same year but not until about 27 million were issued from the Philly mint. The initials reappeared in 1918 but were moved to the obverse just under Lincoln’s bust and are hard to see with the naked eye. Now you know. Thanks for stopping by! – Chris

Comments are always welcomed as I’ve learned quite a bit from reader feedback. As always, thanks for stopping by and, while you’re at it, feel free to visit my camera shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com (CC Design Studios hosted by Etsy). – Chris Whelan

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, is this blog’s property and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris, Chasing Classic Cameras with Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2022 Chasing Classic Cameras with Chris (Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic), Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

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Olympus Superzoom 70 (zoom 2000)

Please take the time to visit Peggy’s site as she’s the best camera hunter I know! If you’re looking for straightforward reviews she’s got them!

Camera Go Camera

This camera from 1993 was a cheap charity shop purchase. I had a feeling I had tried an example before, but checking my camera post list didn’t reveal it. You can find all the technical details you require here and a manual here.

When I first started using film again…and obsessively trying cameras, Olympus was my number one love. They are still up there and I was happy to find this example. It is big and bulky, with a limited aperture selection of f4.5-7.8, but I liked it straight away. The zoom isn’t much to talk about and I ended up leaving it on 38mm for most of the shots. It is comfortable to hold despite the bulk. You can turn the flash off, but it resets once you turn it off and on again. Best of all you have a choice of battery options.

After trying another camera

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Leitz Parvo 250 Projector

I’ve recently acquired this Leitz slide projector from a local client of mine. Made in Germany about 1949 it was purchased by her father who was a US Army officer stationed in Germany shortly after the war. As best as I’ve been able to discover, it was made for only one year before a newer model was released. The newer model was known as the Prado 250.

Parvo 250 “Small Screen Projector”.
Shown here with the roll film adapter inserted.
Adapter for showing individual 35mm slides.
With the lens housing removed the body of the projector is marked as the Pravo II.
A super sharp Leitz-Hektor 10cm f/2.5 projection lens.
As simple as simple gets. It uses one 250 watt lamp and no cooling fan. To the right of the bulb is the mirror and to the left is two condenser lenses.
The case is in excellent condition and is unremarkable that there’s no branding anywhere on it. The locks still work and I have both keys.
After seven decades of use, it still looks great (and solid).

There you have it, a brief picture tour of this very interesting slide projector from Leitz. Thanks for stopping by and have a great day! – Chris

Comments are always welcomed as I’ve learned quite a bit from reader feedback. As always, thanks for stopping by and while you’re at it, feel free to visit my camera shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com (CC Design Studios hosted by Etsy). – Chris Whelan

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, is this blog’s property and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris, Chasing Classic Cameras with Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2021 Chasing Classic Cameras with Chris (Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic), Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

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ABBA Fan Mag from 1979

Look at how young they were in this image!

Carol purchased this while we were still living in Japan in 1979. It just sold to a collector in Switzerland on Etsy! It’s amazing how some of our collections of things get around.

Thanks for stopping by! – Chris & Carol

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, is this blog’s property and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris, Chasing Classic Cameras with Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2021 Chasing Classic Cameras with Chris (Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic), Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

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Vintage Leather Camera Bag

I came across the beautiful leather camera bag while meeting with some clients of mine. They had a nice assortment of classic cameras to sell and as an afterthought, added this bag with the cameras.

I was immediately taken with the overall design of the bag and who couldn’t resist the warm and well-worn patina the leather had developed over the decades.

What amazed me the most was that all of the stitching on the exterior of the bag was intact – nothing had pulled apart. I’m guessing that the bag is from the 1950s although the 1960s wouldn’t be a stretch.

The only spot where some of the stitching had given way was around this accessory pouch sewn into the bottom of the lid. No other markings could be found except for these and a Google search didn’t provide any clues as to who was the maker.

I had planned on restoring the leather and maybe redoing the dividers inside but a lack of free time prevented me from ever getting around to it. So, I listed it in my online Etsy shop (www.ccstudio2380.com) and it sold within a day! Hopefully, the owner has plans for the bag that include a freshening up of the leather and maybe even getting the lock to work again.

The fabric-covered dividers are still very much intact but could stand some padding and new fabric.
Even the bottom of the bag is in amazing condition. Maybe I’m way off on the age of this bag.

Has anyone seen a bag like this before? How about the logo inside the bag? As I’ve mentioned, there are no other markings indicating where it was made and who may have made it. In the end, everything worked out alright – a customer bought a beautiful bag and has the chance to give it another life. Thanks for stopping by! – Chris

Comments are always welcomed as I’ve learned quite a bit from reader feedback. As always, thanks for stopping by and while you’re at it, feel free to visit my camera shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com (CC Design Studios hosted by Etsy). – Chris Whelan

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, is this blog’s property and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris, Chasing Classic Cameras with Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2021 Chasing Classic Cameras with Chris (Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic), Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

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Antique toolbox from ca. 1890

Toolbox from ca. 1890

Here is an awesome wood toolbox (carpenter’s box) that belonged to a well-known woodworker in Manhattan back at the turn of the 20th century. His business card is pictured below.

It’s well-traveled but still sturdy after all these years. Someone had taped it shut decades ago so there’s some residue from the tape to remove. I think something like Formby’s Furniture Refinisher would do wonders for the box without taking away it’s character and hard earned patina. It’s about 28 inches long by 9 inches wide . Someone with some time on their hands may be able to get the lock latch working again.

Thanks for stopping by and have a great day!

Comments are always welcomed as I’ve learned quite a bit from reader feedback. As always, thanks for stopping by and while you’re at it, feel free to visit my camera shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com (CC Design Studios hosted by Etsy). – Chris Whelan

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris, Chasing Classic Cameras with Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2021 Chasing Classic Cameras with Chris (Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic), Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

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Yashica FR II

Wonderful camera, awesome site! Be sure to check out ALL of Peggy’s posts!

Camera Go Camera

I have been exchanging emails with the owner of a great website about Yashicas. As I live in Japan I sometimes see hard to find models and have sent him a few. He wanted to do something in return, so I suggested he send me a camera in return. He did, and this is the camera. Just to be clear, I don’t suggest you inundate either of us with requests for swaps,  the postage could get out of hand. BUT it is awesome receiving surprise cameras.

This is the Yashica FR II which was first introduced in 1977, an awesome year…and a sad year in music terms.

In my excitement and haste to try it, along with the 12 exposure film he sent, I completely forgot that he wrote about cleaning off the old seals. So this is the test roll:

Oops. But they are sharp and the colours…

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