Fujicaflex Automat – Fuji Photo Film’s 1st TLR – 1954

My wish may be closer to reality! I’m “in the hunt” for one of these exceptional cameras now.

Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic

Vintage camera wish list item 101.

The Fuji Photo Film Co., Ltd., Fujicaflex 

フジカフレックス

Designed to incorporate the best features that were available in the medium format twin-lens reflex camera market, the Fujicaflex debuted in 1954 – at a very premium price, we might add. While surfing today, we stumbled upon this wonderful site from Fujifilm Europe. You can check it out here

It’s nice to see a large corporation like Fujifilm blog about some of the really cool cameras that helped make their company great. In another blog, they go on to talk about the amazing Fujipet from 1957.

Twin-Reflex-Cam-433x375

For more about this wonderful camera, take a trip here too to see Mr. Yoshinobu Koyasu’s camera collection… it is not to be missed!

It’s certainly interesting to read (Fujifilm Europe’s blog) – the older posts that pay tribute to the cameras of their roots are so interesting.

Enjoy!

Chris

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Yashica Moves to a New Factory 1972

Some additional history about Yashica – it’s worth a look if you missed it the first time.
Chris

Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic

We’ll be the first to admit – not an exciting title or topic for a blog. It may even be a stretch for a blog named the ‘Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic’. But we feel compelled to share information about the Yashica Company, however slight and trivial, with our dear readers.

Yashica’s first factory was along the shores of beautiful Lake Suwa. As best as we can tell, the original location (from Yashica brochures) was Shimosuwa-machi, Suwa-gun, Nagano Prefecture. This was the industrial campus of Yashica and it grew over the years to occupy almost every square meter of the property.

Yashica's Shimosuwa Factory Opened in 1956 along the shores of Lake Suwa in Nagano.

IMG_20151218_0008 (2) Different view of the same campus. Yashica was running out of room by the mid 1960s. 

By the early 1970s, Yashica converted the Katakana silk mill in the neighboring town of Okaya into its newest factory. We don’t have all…

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Yashica MF-2 Super… 1986

We love this little Yashica but we haven’t found the time to run a roll of film through it yet! Soon!

Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic

We don’t often collect modern Yashica cameras – especially during Yashica’s last days after Kyocera (Kill-a-Yashica) took over.

This one was sent to us by a Flickr friend and as you can see, it’s new in the original box. The MF-2 Super is a DX camera which sensed the DX code on the 35mm film canister and set the appropriate ASA / ISO / DIN.

25965272473_a80d24519c_o Yashica MF-2 Super 35mm film camera set from 1986.

26295606350_65700d54b4_o

We haven’t found the time to load a roll of film and check out this little beauty… soon we hope. We like the black, red and gold details on the body and lens and the auto everything (almost) features. As a comparison, we also have the Fujica DL-20 as pictured below in the sales brochure.

%e2%97%8f%e3%83%81%e3%83%a9%e3%82%b7 DL-20 in black and red.

The DL-20 is a mid-1990s camera from Fujica. We have the red body model and it…

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Minolta Uniomat III

Another look at this seldom seen camera set from the early 1960s.

Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic

35mm rangefinder camera from Minolta. This one is from about 1963. Neat little camera – a bit small for my hands so it’s hard to reach the lens to focus comfortably. The rangefinder focuses well but doesn’t snap out at you although the view is bright. No film test for this one. The shutter fires and the speeds appear to be on time – the rear lens element is “ate up” (Southern term) with fungus and when I got rid of the fungus I was left with an etched lens. Maybe some polishing might bring it back. The light meter appears to be accurate too.

It’s a pretty little thing. I like the gray leatherette body and it certainly looks nice under my studio lights. We like to collect complete sets when we can and this one has its original box, leather case (black), silica-gel pack and the owners manual…

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Fujicolor Simple Ace Disposable Camera

Great review, awesome pics, and a timely message about plastic consumption! Well done my friend!
Be sure to check out her blog – always great stuff!

Camera Go Camera

A couple of years ago there was a bit of a “thing” about this single use camera after a 30th-anniversary edition was released. I bought one and shoved it in my fridge and basically forgot about it.

As you can see it came with a cover, which I didn’t use. Recently I have seen a rubbery cover on sale too. Anyway, as for his style of camera – it seems ridiculous to me, given all the issues with plastic consumption. Plus there are literally thousands upon thousands of great film cameras around that cost the same as one of these. I tried another one I found in a junk bin, but this is the first time I have ever bought one and I felt guilty every time I used it. Lomography have released a semi-single use camera which is slightly better, but even they say reloading it is tricky.

While researching…

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Yashica’s ‘Sailor Boy’ – 1962

Here’s another look at this cute little guy and his cousins. We’ve added a new boy via South Africa -more details shortly!

Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic

Yashica’s advertising figurine the ‘Sailor Boy’ first appeared in 1962 – closely associated with the launch of Yashica’s J-3 35mm single-lens reflex camera. It was made for Yashica by Modern Plastics of Japan and was produced in a variety of sizes – from a 20cm shop and dealer display model down to this little 10cm guy.

This one ⇓ came to our collection from Germany and man was he a dirty guy!

DSCF5218 Covered with a coat of nicotine and grime, he looked like he was in a bar room fight! But he has a good casting and the paint looks good. Notice how grungy his hat is.

DSCF5219 Since he was covered with a thin film of nicotine he was sticky! 

DSCF5220 Looks like he has a black eye! 

After some restoration work in the studio, he’s looking ⇓ much better and brighter.

DSCF5221 Nice and shiney! Still a hint of a black smudge…

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Yashica-A: Collecting 101*

Here’s another look at this fine camera set from Yashica!

Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic

*Or how to run out of space for it all real quick!

As much as Carol and I would love to go on collecting camera sets, the cameras will eventually win out! Even when we narrow our collecting to let’s say only twin-lens reflex cameras made in the mid 1950s, and only made by Yashima-Yashica, we’d still run out of space and money. There were just too many made (obviously) to be able to collect all the different models and all the different variations. Yashima-Yashica was, by far, the most prolific TLR maker – ever! I believe they finally stopped by 1986 which was long after TLRs fell from favor!

So we’ve reached the point they sing about in that Disney movie – “Let it Go”! 

Collecting Yashima-Yashica cameras is a very satisfying endeavor. We’ve been at it for decades, we know. There’s enough of them around so the…

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Nicca Type 33 and the Yashica YE… Mighty Morphing Classic Cameras!

Another look at these often overlooked and underappreciated cameras.

Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic

Some background – Yashica acquired Nicca in May 1958. Nicca was well known for making high quality 35mm rangefinder cameras since the late 1940s.

Nicca cameras normally came with lenses branded as Nikkor. When the Nicca Type 33 was released in 1958, it came with a Nicca branded lens. We don’t know if Nicca was the actual lens maker or another company made the lens and Nicca had their name affixed. Either way, when Yashica took over the company the Nicca 33 was sold with the Nicca branded lens.

large nicca 33 ad Cute original advertisement from July-August 1958 for the Nicca Type 33 35mm camera and lens.

If you look closely at the ad above, you can see that the lens is marked “Nicca Camera CO.” and is a 50mm f2.8 lens. The serial number isn’t completely clear but looks like a prototype number or some sort (maybe not)… maybe 8000 or something…

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Spam-a-lot – Don’t You Just Love IT?

No, not the movie or the “food” item. Those annoying SPAM messages in your emails. Sometimes the mixture of stuff can be funny. Like this weird combination…

spam

Apparently, there’s a herpes “blitz” going on (whatever that is). Not sure what a “MILF” is either but I don’t want to know. Does anyone else’s SPAM look like this? Or even more bizarre I bet.

Oh well, we always hit the delete key.

Happy Day to y’all – skin tags and all!