Pentamatic Microscope Adapter – 1960

I have yet to use a microscope adapter in nearly 50 years of 35mm photography – but that doesn’t mean that I haven’t collected them and enjoyed the thought of someday using one. I’ve had a few Canon adapters over the years too.

The first step would be actively looking for a microscope to purchase on one of the many online auction sites. Something I will do.

Here’s a nice adapter from Yashica with the Pentamatic bayonet mount. It’s one of the first accessories to appear in the early Pentamatic instruction booklets from 1960. List price was ¥2,500 which was fairly expensive back in the day.

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The adapter mounts directly to the body of the camera – no lens needed.

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A scan from an early Pentamatic sales brochure.

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These instructions are from a later booklet featuring the adapter for the M42 screw mount.

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I believe that the microscope depicted here is a Yashima microscope but it’s not made by Yashica. Yashima was the first name that Yashica went by in the early 1950s.

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Not made by Yashica but still a super cool vintage microscope.

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Typically you’d use a right angle finder such as this one to make it a bit easier to use the adapter on a microscope.

What’s always amazed me is just how many different camera manufacturers made microscope adapters – Canon, Olympus, Nikon just to name a few and how many are still available for purchase online from various auction sites that are unused, still new in their boxes.

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Thanks for stopping by! – Chris

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2019 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

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Happy SUNday! – chasing color

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Have a beautiful day y’all!

Camera: Samsung Galaxy S8+

Chris

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2019 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

Vintage Bewi Automat “A” Exposure Meter

Straight from the desk of a mid-century designer, this super cool (and fully working) selenium cell exposure meter is a joy to use and play with.

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The first thing I noticed about it is that unlike typical meters from this period (the 1950s) there’s no visible meter needle or pointer. Everything that moves does so inside. I know, I took it apart to see what was going on and there was the needle being “busy” reacting to light. Maybe this ad will do a better job at describing just what makes this meter so special.

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Semi-transparent cover over the selenium cells allows for incident light readings.

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Selenium cells exposed for full reflected light readings.

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In its case, it’s about the size of a deck of cards but it fits nicely in the palm of your hand. I have it available in my shop as it’s time to pass it along to the next collector. You can see additional pictures of it and a complete description at http://www.ccstudio2380.com

Thanks for stopping by! – Chris

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2019 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

OK, Creepy 35mm Slide

This super cool 35mm slide viewer from the 1950s has an interesting surprise inside – how about a creepy scientist?

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Yikes! I don’t really want to know what’s on that counter.

Full disclosure – the slide says it’s an official photograph of the Veterans Administration so I’m thinking it’s OK.

Thanks for stopping by and BTW, this is available at http://www.ccstudio2380.com

Chris

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2019 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

When lens hoods “attack”!

Here’s something you don’t see every day – if ever. What happens to a rubber lens hood (lens shade) when left on for two decades? You get this…

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When I saw this lens my first impression was that it had been in a fire. I had to pry it out of the leather camera bag it was in. Not very pretty at first glance.

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Step 2 – Peeling the “melted” hood away from the lens body. What a gooey mess!

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Success! No damage to the lens and I was able to unscrew what was left of the hood.

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The lens suffered no permanent damage and after a good cleaning looks new.

I imagine that over time the “rubber” deteriorated through some chemical process with the air. Hiding out in a dark leather camera bag probably didn’t help. Lesson learned – if you own one of these monsters go check your camera bag now and toss it before it “attacks”!!!

Thanks for stopping by! – Chris

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2018 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

 

Murder at Battery Place – or, is that a science experiment in my camera?

Battery failure leads to a slow but sure death – insidious fumes attacking sensitive circuits destroying everything in its path! Proud cameras reduced to rubble – Nikon, Canon, Yashica – no brand is immune!

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Hydrogen gas is released as the battery ages and discharges. The acid will eat through anything in its path. In my experience, once a battery compartment reaches this state, the circuits are fried. I’ve only been able to bring one camera back to life that was this far gone. Viniger, alcohol, toothpaste and a brush or any number of other tricks seldom work.

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Strangely beautiful – all of the colors of the rainbow inside your gear. It doesn’t need to be decades of neglect, sometimes a battery goes ballistic in as little as a year. Most of these batteries were found inside cameras from the 1970s, 1980s, and a few in the 1990s.

Sometimes the corrosion will eat into surrounding metal parts to attack areas outside of the battery box. I’ve seen cardboard boxes with holes.

These are cameras that I acquired during my recent travels to appraise camera collections. In extreme cases, the battery compartments won’t even open to show the offending battery within. I’ve had to throw away Yashica movie cameras, an Argus movie camera, a Yashica Partner, a Polaroid 360, and countless slide viewers.

So, go to your favorite closet and dig out your gear right now! Remove any and all batteries – even button cell batteries. Cheap batteries or wildly expensive batteries – name brands or store-branded ones – they all do it. SAVE YOUR GEAR!

Thanks for stopping by!

Chris

NWF – Certified Wildlife Habitats

 

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We encourage you to get your property certified – it’s easy and fun to do. It makes a great family project that pays dividends over and over.

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Our backyard NWF Certified Wildlife Habitat

It can be any part of your yard – a small front yard garden or your entire property!

Since moving here in 1991, Carol and I (and the entire family) have planted over 50 native trees on our small suburban property. Since most of our backyard is a natural bog with a small pond we’ve planted mostly water-loving trees – bald cypress, river birch, river maples, pines, Leyland cypress, oaks, dogwoods, redbuds, and a bunch of native azaleas.

It’s important to leave fallen branches in a pile in the yard as it makes great cover for all sorts of critters. Our bog and pond support mosquito fish, river cooter (turtles), snakes of all types and even leeches!

I’m sure a river otter or two have appeared from time to time. We have some stray deer (a bit hard for them to stay since it’s so wet back there), Florida black bears, raccoons, opossums, armadillos, eagles, hawks, and all manner of other birds – mostly cardinals. An occasional vulture is spotted whenever something needs to be disposed of.

The key to our backyard is – no chemicals! No fertilizers, and no watering. It must take care of itself. We do occasionally weed non-native species and invading vines and we do use mulch.

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Bald cypress needles

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Japanese black pine

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Florida river birch bark

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Bald cypress springing to life from seed

Thanks for stopping by!

C&C ^.^

 

My “Dad”

My father-in-law Frank at work (Pratt & Whitney Aircraft) in 1993. He worked for “Pratt” for 40 years and was a top-flight welder of jet engines. Frank’s still going strong at 85! Here’s to you dad!

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Frank was a foremost J58 engine welder for nearly his entire career at P&W

This logo (above) is known as the “Florida” eagle which is installed on the J58 turbojet engines used in the Lockheed SR-71 Blackbird reconnaissance aircraft and on the RL10 liquid hydrogen/liquid oxygen engine used in the Centaur rocket.

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A flock of Blackbirds

Thanks for stopping by!

Chris

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2018 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

more machines

We can’t get enough of this “other-worldly look” – the neon blue (as our friend Pam pointed out) is awesome!

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Actually no post-production work here except to add the logos.

 

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Samsung Galaxy S8+

 

Thanks for stopping by!

Chris & Carol ^.^

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2018 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.