wordless wednesday

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Thanks for stopping by! – Chris

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Leotax Merite Camera Case – 1959

Here’s a beautiful leather camera case for the Leotax Merite and Elite. The quality of its construction is evident even after 60 years of use (gentle use). The Merite was a 35mm rangefinder camera built by the Leotax Camera Company in the Leica style.

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A beautiful leather camera case from around early 1959.

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Excellent materials and attention to detail.

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Quality stitching throughout.

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The bottom half of the case was attached by a patented hinge assembly that quickly detached from the top half.

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Advertising flyer for the Leotax Merite. The camera and lens sold for 42,500 JPY which was about $118 in 1959. The case went for an additional 1,800 JPY which was $5

Thanks for stopping by! – Chris

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2019 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

Happy SUNday! – Mets vs. Braves July 2009

It’s hard to believe that it’s been ten years since Tim and I attended this baseball game at Turner Field in Atlanta. Our Mets were soundly defeated (as usual) but the best times were spent with Tim.

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Tim and I. Always true to the Orange and Blue! Let’s Go Mets!

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Tim with Jackie who was the nicest Braves fan we ever met! Actually, Jackie was a security guard at the game and she could be seen on TV at every Braves home game as she worked the area behind home plate.

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Thanks for stopping by and have a beautiful day! – Chris

 

Canon – World Cup 1986

Not often seen, a Canon 1986 World Cup T50 35mm SLR.

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The Canon T50 is an underrated camera (as is the T70). Built-in power drive and programmed automation made it a super simple 35mm SLR that used all of Canon’s FD lenses. If you wanted simple, fast and accurate the T50 and the T70 are great values in the used market.

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Thanks for stopping by! – Chris

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2019 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

Leotax Merite TV2 – 1958

While doing some research on late 1950s Japanese 35mm rangefinder cameras, I came across the Leotax brand. Their cameras are highly regarded by collectors and photographers alike. They have a reputation of being one of the better built Leica inspired models, especially during the early 1950s. I personally believe that Nicca built the best versions as I own several different models and I occasionally shoot with a Nicca 3-S.

My good friend Paul Sokk pointed out that a Leotax camera box in my collection has the name of the model spelled differently than the accepted norm – ‘Merite vs. Merit’. Intrigued we both started looking for proof as to the camera’s “real” name. The camera was also known as the model TV2.

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My recently acquired Leotax Merite camera box (from Japan). Mérite in French.

“Excellent mechanism with the best technology”… Leotax Merite

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Paul spotted this sales flyer from Leotax. The name ‘Merite’ is clearly spelled out. Notice that the camera itself does not have a name on it.

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Here’s a Merite camera (not verified) with a box that’s marked ‘TV2’ which was another name that the Merite was known by.

It’s interesting to note that the next camera in the Leotax line was called ‘Elite’. Another French word that would fit nicely with Merite. Is any of this definitive? No, but the fact that the flyer and the box match I would imagine that was and is the intended name.

For more about the Leotax Camera Company please visit here. The Merite is referred to by its improper name at the moment.

Thanks for stopping by! – Chris

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2019 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

 

Happy SUNday! – Snake House

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A wonderful surprise in our side garden. Looks like she found the perfect home. I believe it’s a southern black racer – a frequent resident of our garden habitats.

Have a beautiful day and thanks for stopping by! – Chris

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2019 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

Yashica TL Electro-X

As I continue to downsize my collection, I’m offering this beautiful Yashica TL Electro-X for purchase. It’s also available in my camera shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com

Yashica TL Electro-X 35mm SLR Film Camera with an Auto Yashinon 50mm f1.4 DS-M Lens from Tomioka Optical

This is a museum-worthy camera set from my personal collection of exceptional Yashicas. It's been inspected, fully tested and is ready to pass on to the next collector. For additional images of the set and a more detailed description of the camera please visit my camera shop and studio at http://www.ccstudio2380.com I mail practically worldwide (there are a few exceptions) and if it's purchased directly from this post I'll mail it for free, fully insured and tracked to your home or business.

$220.00

The camera was assembled in September 1973 at Yashica’s newest factory (at that time) which was located in Hong Kong – its bottom plate is stamped “HONG KONG” which is rarely seen today. The 50mm lens is an extremely fast f/ 1.4 designed and built by the famous Tomioka Optical Company (which was fully part of Yashica by this time).

This set will come to you with a fresh battery, the original Yashica 57mm lens cap, the proper instruction booklet (dated 09/73) and the Yashica booklet ‘Yashinon Lenses & Accessories’ (dated 08/73).

This is a great opportunity to acquire an important camera in not only Yashica’s history but in the history of 35mm SLR development.

Thanks for stopping by and good luck! – Chris

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2019 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

 

Nicca 3-F Camera Case – first of its kind?

I know, this is not an overly exciting post – rather obscure actually.

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Nicca 3-F ‘Snap Shot Case’.

The Nicca 3-F was one of many well-built 35mm rangefinder cameras produced by Nicca Camera Company in the late 1950s. Nicca would be acquired by Yashica in early 1958 and some of the technology that Nicca possessed went to Yashica in the deal. The acquisition directly led to the development of Yashica’s first 35mm SLR, the Pentamatic in late 1959. I digress.

My good friend Paul Sokk (www.yashicatlr.com) recently shared this scan of an instruction booklet he acquired for his Nicca. What struck me as I translated (actually an app on my phone translated it) is how this camera case was constructed.

Here’s the translation: “The snap shot case uses a brown box skin and comes with a shoulder strap as an accessory. It is glued, and the case of the stringer does not use any adhesive. Moreover, it has sufficient strength against external force (especially the projection of the lens part). Recently, there are those who use the camera out of the case and naked, but since it is likely that the camera is often hurt, it is recommended to put it in the case and use it as much as possible”.

I hadn’t noticed Nicca cases before this one that did not use stitching. Why is that important? On most vintage (40-year-old or more) cases the stitching has long since failed and the case falls apart. It will be interesting to see if these glued cases stood the test of time and in better condition than their stitched cousins.

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A close-up view of a glued case.

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Typical stitched case.

Thanks for stopping by! – Chris

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2019 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.