Konica Z-up 60 35mm Compact Camera (New in Box) – Available for Purchase –

Hey all! Carol and I continue to downsize our collection (menagerie?) of really cool “modern classics” film cameras (whew)! This one is from Konica Minolta and is a nicely featured 35mm automatic camera that’s as new as the day it was made. It’s still in its original box and includes all the goodies that came with it plus a nice bonus of some Fujicolor film. It features a Konica power zoom lens from 35-60mm.

Check it out…

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Please visit our online store at https://www.ccstudio2380.com for more details and to purchase this nice camera set.

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It’s in perfect, fully tested and working condition and ready for Christmas!

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No worries about dating your pictures – I believe the calendar goes up to 2049!

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We’ve included new batteries and an expired roll of Fujicolor color negative film for making prints. We’ve used this film before and it still produces nice colors and contrast! We’ve got the original box, all papers, an unopened strap and a really nice Konica leatherette case.

Thanks for stopping by! Remember, check out our online store at https://www.ccstudio2380.com

Chris and Carol ^.^

 

Our House – Honmoku, Yokohama 1977

As a tie-in to a recent post by our friend Peggy at Camera Go Camera of our old neighborhood (US Navy Area 2 Military Base Housing) in Japan. Here’s a picture of our house at 283-D Area 2 after a rare light snowfall.

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Our US Navy base house in Honmoku, Naka-ku, Yokohama from May 1977 to February 1980. We were the last Navy family to live there as the US Navy was in the process of turning over control of the land to the Japanese Government.

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US Navy housing Area 2 looking east towards the bay. This part of Yokohama was still very industrial in the late 1970s. Our house is the blue two story about in the middle left. This shot was taken on a nice and steamy hot August day.

Camera: Canon F-1 on Kodachrome 25 color slide film

Thanks for stopping by!

Chris and Carol

Olympus OMG (OM20)

Wonderful photography in our old neighborhood of Honmoku, Naka-ku, Yokohama. Thanks Peggy for such a great photo essay!

Camera Go Camera

I saw this camera online and thought OMG I have to have it. OMG, really how awesome is that. OMG was first used as an acronym over a hundred years ago in a letter to Winston Churchill. This camera is really the OM-20, but it was released in some markets as the OMG in 1983. It isn’t much different from the OM-10, but it does have a built-in manual adapter.

Finding an example released as OMG seemed to be impossible in Japan so I reached out to my Yashica friend in America and it seemed as soon as I asked, sourced, paid, it was here. It came with a Vivitar wide-angle lens, which was perfect as I have a few 50mm OM lenses… though not in Japan. It also came with a battery, even more awesome. The owner of the website has told me he used to live…

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Yashica-Tomioka Pentamatic Lens – Available for Purchase

We’ve decided to make one of our nicest Yashica Pentamatic lenses made by Tomioka Optical available for purchase. This is a special lens from our personal collection. The Super Yashinon-R f/ 2.8 3.5cm wide angle lens is from the earliest production of these hard to find lenses. It is marked Yashica Tominon and a relatively small number were produced in late 1959 and very early 1960.

This lens set is extra special as it includes the original Yashica brown leather case with strap and original metal Yashica front lens cap (52mm). The lens features a super low serial number and a fast f/ 2.8 aperture. The world famous Tomioka made glass is crystal clear and the lens barrel is factory fresh looking. No issues with this beauty – everything works as it should and frankly the lens looks new.

If you’ve been a regular reader here at the ‘Fanatic’ you’ve come to appreciate just how rare high quality Pentamatic lenses, cameras and accessories are. We’ve seen prices slowly creeping up on these rarities as more people realize that they’re just aren’t that many left in near perfect condition.

Please note: this lens can be used on modern digital camera bodies. There is an adapter to convert the unique Pentamatic bayonet mount to M42. Then use an adapter to mount M42 to your camera. You’ll love the results!

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The lens barrel is flawless – the markings are bright, sharp and clean.

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As you can see, the lens is marked Yashica and Tominon. The first run of these lenses featured the Tomioka Optical ‘Tominon’ name. Also note the extremely low serial number, 309. The first two digits are ’35’ which is the focal length. The next four digits are the production sequence numbers.

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Rear view of the Pentamatic bayonet mount and the six aperture blades.

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The lens barrel still shows a nice factory sheen after all these years. Lens ‘Made in Japan’ at the Tomioka Optical factory in Tokyo.

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Smooth as silk. The aperture stops click in and out nicely, the focus is smooth and the lens is simply gorgeous.

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Original brown leather case is in exceptional condition.

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The stitching is still tight and complete.

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The straps are complete and the interior is clean and bright.

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The lens mounts securely to a Pentamatic body and looks sharp! Sorry, but the camera body is not included in this opportunity.

So there you have it. A historic lens for Yashica’s first SLR camera made by world famous Tomioka Optical in nearly new condition. Perfect for everyday shooting or for your collection.

If you would like to purchase this lens, please pop on over to our online store at https://www.ccstudio2380.com

We have it at a great value now but if you purchase it through our blog I’ll offer a 10% discount! Perfect for Christmas!

Thanks… Chris & Carol ^.^

Please respect that all content, including photos and text are property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2017 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

flower dreams

Christmas cactus in the studio…

One of our favorite blossoms – each flower is different from the next and differs from day to day. This beautiful cactus is in our indoor window garden and right of cue, it’s putting on a show for Christmas.

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Fujifilm FinePix S9900W – soft focus

Chris

Please respect that all content, including photos and text are property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2017 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

The Yashica Pentamatic – Our 6 Year Search – Some Conclusions & Wild Speculations

We’ve been hot on the elusive trail of the Pentamatic family of cameras from Yashica now for well over 6 years. We’ve looked under every rock (auction sites), nook (web searches) and crannies (well, just crannies) for anything related to the Pentamatic. Our search has led us to some interesting conclusions – and wild speculations!

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Some Conclusions

The first Pentamatic was “born” in December 1959 but wasn’t available for sale in the U.S. until April 1960. The Pentamatic was Yashica’s first 35mm single-lens reflex camera and was designed with the help of technology obtained from Yashica’s acquisition of Nicca Camera in 1958 and some involvement with designers from Zunow Optical in 1959. Of course Yashica designers were involved too as well as collaboration with Tomioka Optical for the first lenses.

The original Pentamatic was a failure. A beautiful, sleek and modern camera at a great price, but still a failure. A replacement(?) for it (Pentamatic Model – II) was released by September 1960 – just a few short months after the original Pentamatic debuted.

The Pentamatic and the Pentamatic II were both out of production by January 1961. The Pentamatic S didn’t appear until around April 1961. Little was significantly changed over the course of these 3 models during this short timeframe. The Pentamatic II only changed the standard lens and nothing else. The body stayed the same with the exception of adding the engraved “II” after the name. No logic to this as Yashica could have simply made the new lens available as an option to the original Pentamatic. There had to be another reason to call it the model II.

The standard lens that was available for the Pentamatic II was designed and built (quickly?) by Zunow vice Tomioka.

The Pentamatic II was only available for sale in Japan.

The Pentamatic S essentially was the replacement for the original Pentamatic – not the Pentamatic II. The model S added a lug for attaching an accessory exposure meter that coupled to the shutter speed dial. The S also added a self-timer and the body got a redesign (the strap lugs were moved to the front and the shutter release button was no longer at a 45 degree angle).

And yes, these folks are not from Yashica but we like them and their name just the same!

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The Instruction Booklets

The booklets have been an additional source of fun separate from the camera searches. The booklet for the original Pentamatic was relatively easy to find. The first Pentamatic saw about 16,000 units made so the booklet is much more available. The Pentamatic II booklet was the hardest to locate since only around 5,000 cameras were made. The Pentamatic S booklet is even more rare – only around 3,000 cameras produced.

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The 3 Pentamatic instruction booklets. Notice that the Pentamatic and Pentamatic II booklets have the same design while the model S differs dramatically. More “clues”.

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The back cover of the Pentamatic II booklet – the only one to carry a date (lower right corner). This one is dated September 1960.

Inside the booklets…

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The original Pentamatic.

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The Pentamatic II.

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The Pentamatic S.

Wild Speculations

Wild Spec 1 – The first Pentamatic was not initially released in Japan. Yashica had a slow go with its early production only a limited number were available for the April to June debut in the U.S. There were only about 4,000 cameras made by then and that just didn’t support a wide release of it in their home market. We further feel that Yashica had a suspicion that the original model would not go over well at home. Why do we feel this way? During our 6 year quest of all things Pentamatic, we’ve yet to find an instruction booklet for the original Pentamatic in Japanese (or any other language besides English). We’ve seen no early 1960s advertisements or sales brochures in Japanese either.

Wild Spec 2 – The Pentamatic II was only available in Japan and was never intended for widespread availability in the world marketplace. We further feel that the Pentamatic II was the camera Yashica intended to release in Japan vice the original Pentamatic. Why? Same thing… in over 6 years of searching we’ve never seen a Pentamatic II instruction booklet in English and the only sales brochures we have are in Japanese. No English ads or brochures anywhere (yet).

Wild Spec 3The Pentamatic S wasn’t available in Japan. Crazy right? Same thing applies here – no Japanese advertising or brochures and no instruction booklets in anything but English.

Wild Spec 4 – As we stated in the conclusions section above, the standard lens for the Pentamatic II (5.8cm f/1.7) was made for Yashica by Zunow Optical vice Tomioka. This flies in the face of what’s known and we don’t have solid written proof (yet). Both the original Pentamatic and the model II ended production in January 1961. By coincidence, that’s the reported date of Yashica’s acquisition of Zunow (or their bankruptcy). Once Zunow went bust they no longer make lenses for the model II.

Wild Spec 5 – Once the model II stopped production, Yashica started selling the original Pentamatic in Japan (or at least increased its availability in Japan). The first sales brochures in Japanese for the original Pentamatic didn’t appear until February 1961. We would still like to find a Pentamatic instruction booklet in Japanese to validate this thought.

Wild Spec 6 – Since the Pentamatic S wasn’t sold in Japan, there was a rather large gap in Yashica’s SLR availability. The next camera to be sold widely in Japan (and the U.S.) was the Penta J but that didn’t come out until the Summer of 1961.

These marketing and production missteps led to a less than stellar debut for Yashica in the world of 35mm SLRs. The competition during this same period was “inventing” much more sophisticated (and mostly more expensive) cameras which had a wider range of interchangeable lenses and accessories. It took Yashica a long time to establish a “foot in the door” with their Penta J and and their first internally coupled exposure metered SLR, the Yashica J-3 (Jaguar).

Things we would like to find…

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Original sales brochure for the Pentamatic II.

The first thing we would like to discover would be an ad, sales brochure or instruction booklet in English for the Pentamatic II. We don’t think we will as we feel that they don’t exist.

We would like to find a Pentamatic instruction booklet in Japanese. They could exist but it appears unlikely at this point.

A Pentamatic S instruction booklet and a sales brochure in Japanese. Don’t think they exist either.

A Pentamatic II box!!! They must exist – someone’s got to have one in their collection!

A Pentamatic (any model) in its original boxes in factory fresh condition. WooHoo!

Solid proof that the standard lens for the Pentamatic II was made by Zunow Optical.

Other than these things, I think we’re good! ^.^

Thanks for your visit! If you’ve made it this far in the post give yourself a big pat on the back! You just may be on your way to becoming a ‘Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic’!

Please stop by our online shop at https://www.ccstudio2380.com and check out some of our classic cameras available for sale.

We are active buyers of quality cameras and equipment – especially anything Yashica, Nicca, Fujica or whatever! Contact us at chriscarol@ccstudio2380.com

Please respect that all content, including photos and text are property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2017 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.