Fujifilm Discovery S100 – 1999

Another Fuji for our “Modern Series” collection. Why collect plastic cameras from the 1990s? Because they’re out there and they’re still in the box new!

If you’re a collector of vintage camera equipment, how many times have you wished that you’d kept all the original boxes that came with your then new Canon, or Nikon or whatever? The old saying, “they don’t make them like they used to anymore” is as true today as it was 50 years ago. Yeah, in 2021 the original Canon F-1 will turn 50 years old! Amazing for me to think that I remember reading about the new F-1 in the photo mags of the day and looking for it at my favorite camera dealer’s shop. If only I had kept the boxes! If only I had bought two instead of just one and kept the second one locked away unused! Wow, that would be nice but it would have been a really bad return on my initial “investment”.

More to the point of this post. Someday these plastic fantastic, point and shoot 35mm compact cameras of the 1980s, 1990s and even the 2000s, will be worth collecting. Notice I didn’t say “worth something”. It’s a chance to have a collection of cameras that represented some pretty amazing technological breakthroughs of their era. And if you start collecting them now, you’ll be able to still get them absolutely new in the box unused. We happen to find collecting these inexpensive cameras a whole lot of fun – it’s like Christmas morning never ends!

Here’s our latest find –

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From 1999 – this little Fuji came as part of a neat kit that included a fresh roll of Fujicolor, a case and coupons for up to $10 off on film and processing.

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Toys

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When the lens cover is slid open the flash automatically pops up.

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Takes 2 AA batteries and a flat watch battery (CR2025).

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Original battery still going strong 17 years into the future!

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Super nice case and a fresh roll of Superia that expired in 2000.

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Fuji Photo Film Company made millions of these type of cameras in the 1980s and 90s. Finding them still in the box new is what makes collecting them fun.

“Tech Specs” – Fujinon Lens 32mm, f/ 4.5, 3 elements in 3 groups – autofocus 1 meter to ∞ – programmed electronic shutter (1/30 to 1/250 sec) – DX coding – auto film advance and auto rewind – built-in flash – self-timer – date function – about 185g

Oh and the date function is good up until 2049! No worries there!

Studio Camera: Fujifilm FinePix S9900W

Chris

 

 

 

Wish List Camera – Fuji Fotorama

Our camera wish list is quite extensive – over the years you get to see a bunch of cameras and of course, if you’re an ardent photographer and camera collector, they’ll be some cameras you desire.

We have no reason to want this Fuji other than it’s just so cool!

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First time we’ve seen the original box and a new unused FP-1.

The Fotorama (crazy cool name) is a rather large format instant film camera made by Fuji Photo Film Company. Released June 1987 –

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Beautiful set that was available for sale recently.

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Just a super cool looking big gun from Fuji!

The Fuji FP-1 Pro features a Fujinon 105mm, f/ 5.6 lens – 4 elements in 5 groups and a shutter that has B, 1 to 1/500 second. It uses FP-100 film and makes an image that is 89 x 118mm. The camera weighs 1,280g and sold for ¥ 69,800

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The camera depicted here in this post is not ours. We’ve curated a group of images of beautiful cameras over the years. This nice set went for $1,000.00 – which in our humble opinion, was very fair given how few new in box cameras still exist.

Thanks for stopping by!

Chris

Yashica-A: Collecting 101*

*Or how to run out of space for it all real quick!

As much as Carol and I would love to go on collecting camera sets, the cameras will eventually win out! Even when we narrow our collecting to let’s say only twin-lens reflex cameras made in the mid 1950s, and only made by Yashima-Yashica, we’d still run out of space and money. There were just too many made (obviously) to be able to collect all the different models and all the different variations. Yashima-Yashica was, by far, the most prolific TLR maker – ever! I believe they finally stopped by 1986 which was long after TLRs fell from favor!

So we’ve reached the point they sing about in that Disney movie – “Let it Go”! 

Collecting Yashima-Yashica cameras is a very satisfying endeavor. We’ve been at it for decades, we know. There’s enough of them around so the choices are plenty – but since Yashicas were built well but built for the masses, they weren’t collected when they were new. Most that are available are well used. They’re still very functional, but well used nonetheless. So if you’re trying to collect complete sets just as they came from the factory, and you want them to work and be in mint (or near mint) condition, good luck! It’s not like collecting Leicas, Nikons, Canons or Rolleis where when you google “nikon mint box” you end up with hundreds to pick from from all across the web. Google “mint yashica box” and you’ll see maybe a dozen of Yashica’s last TLR – the Mat 124G. A great camera but it’s common. The early stuff from Yashima-Yashica, well that’s a whole different ballgame, and that ballgame is fun!

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This one is from 1957,  made by Yashima Optical – the Yashica-A

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Solidly built and well maintained.

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All the factory goodies.

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“Fall out of bed” easy to operate – shoot 6x6cm negatives or color slide film soon after loading it. Great optics, accurate shutter and bright viewing screen.

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Yashimar f/ 3.5, 80mm lenses made by Tomioka Optical.

The Yashica-A is a great medium format camera. Simple to use and produces super sharp, large images that you’ll be amazed came from your hands. Why is the A the best? This one is 6 decades old and works perfectly. Why? Virtually nothing on it to break or jam. Simple winding knob, no self-timer and black yarn light seals that never fail. No built-in light meter (use a phone app) or use a vintage hand held meter or guess at the exposure or learn the “Sunny-16” rule. You almost have to try to make a bad image with a camera like this. Worried about the reversed image in the viewing hood? You’ll get over it quickly and you’ll soon love composing and shooting in the square format (6 x 6).

This model A (remember, “Let it Go”) is available for purchase. If you have an interest, contact us at chriscarol@ccstudio2380.com or visit us at http://www.ccstudio2380.com

If there’s something that you’re looking for maybe we have it or can find one for you. You never know!

Thanks for stopping by!

Studio Camera: Fujifilm FinePix S9900W

Chris