Leica Reloadable Film Cassette – IXMOO

Many 35mm rangefinder camera makers offered a reloadable metal film cassette for use with their cameras. Maybe one of the first to do so was Leitz for their Leica cameras.

Pictured below is one of those cassettes with its original Bakelite canister (film can). I believe this set was released around 1953 and was originally intended to be used with the new Leica M3.

Here’s a comparison between a standard disposable film cartridge from 1959 next to the metal reloadable cassette from Leitz (Code IXMOO). Overall the cartridges are within 1 mm of each other but as can be seen, the top of the Leitz canister is slightly taller.

The reloadable film cartridge is shown being used with the Leica IIIg which was the last Leica screw mount lens body made by Leica. My instruction book is from 1957.
The cartridges are about 50 mm tall to the top of the film spool.

The idea was simple. Since buying 35mm film in bulk was popular at the time, reloadable cassettes were a necessity to keep the cost of taking pictures low. As the disposable film cartridges became standardized the use of bulk film decreased as it was much simpler to use the premade film canisters.

While I was in college back in the early 1970s and taking some photography classes, I bulk loaded my own B&W films (mostly Kodak Plus X). It was a pain but it was far less expensive.

The earliest metal film cassettes made by Leitz were coded FILCA and were slightly taller than the newer IXMOO. I don’t have a FILCA cassette for comparison but I’d like to find one (I’ll gladly accept a donation of one if you have a spare).

From a Leica illustrated price list from 1939, the FILCA was Cat. No. 66,800 and was listed as a “Spare Roll Film Magazine” and sold for $3.00 USD. The catalog covers are pictured below.

Thanks for stopping by and if you’ve made it this far, congratulations for sticking with it! – Chris

Be sure to stop by my camera shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2020 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

wordless wednesday

Have a wonderful day and thanks for stopping by! – Chris

Be sure to stop by my camera shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2020 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

Awesome photographs – 1972

Titled “Fantasy”. This image is by Hiroki Hayashi, an acclaimed professional photographer using a Yashica TL ELECTRO-X ITS and Auto Yashinon-DX 28mm f/2.8 lens f/8 at speed setting 1/30 second.

Taken with a Yashica TL ELECTRO-X ITS and Yashinon-DX 21mm f/3.3 lens at f/5.6 at 1/60 second. Image by acclaimed professional photographer Takeji Iwamiya. Titled “Solarization”.

Thanks for stopping by and have a fantastic day! – Chris

Be sure to stop by my camera shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2020 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

No Love Fuji? The Discovery 90 Date

This wonderful Fuji deserves another look.

Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic

The plastic fantastic wonders of the 1980s and 1990s generally receive no love – especially looking back on them with our digitized eyeballs in 2017. These overlooked (even when new for the most part) cameras were the bridge cameras for many photographers that were moving away from their bulky SLRs from the 1970s and looking for something easy, carefree and light to take with them on short outings and family get togethers. The 35mm format was the clear winner in the format wars, now manufacturers wanted think-free 35s that were as easy to use as falling outta bed (?).

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This Fuji Discovery 90 Date was introduced in May 1993 to an already crowded plastic 35mm marketplace. So how to stand out? Drop-in loading, auto focus, auto exposure auto rewind and auto wind was a good start. A big bright viewfinder centered over the lens – and macro capability (23 1/2…

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Happy SUNday! – ‘ratsun’?

Hi all – just a quick hello on this Sunday. It’s not the best picture in the world but I was able to catch a rodent peeking out from our garden sun.

You have to look really close but you can just see the little face and paw peeking out from the mouth of our garden sun sculpture. I’ve seen them there before and I believe it’s a common Florida woodrat or in this case, ratsun.

Have a wonderful day and be safe out there! – Chris

Visit http://www.ccstudio2380.com for all of your photographic needs.

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2020 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

Burke & James 4×5 Press Camera Kit – 1952

Hi all! Thanks for stopping by. I wanted to share this wonderful camera kit that I’ve recently acquired from the original owner’s family. I’ve done some minor restoration on the rare original leather and wood case and I’ve gone through the camera and cleaned and inspected (tested) everything.

The complete kit with sheet film holders (5), rare lens shade, instruction booklet, flash bulbs, and the camera.
The case is made from wood that’s been covered with leather. Some of the edges showed some wear so I did some minor restoration. The aluminum lens shade is made by Tiffen and uses a Kodak adapter. An original unused lens board is also included.

The camera was originally owned by noted New Mexico writer and photographer Ken Cobean. Ken’s work has appeared in magazines such as Life, Time, and National Geographic and Ken received two prestigious awards from Kodak at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair.

This beautiful set is now available in my camera shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com – pop on over and check it out. There’s even a short video that you can watch.

Thanks for stopping by and have a great day! – Chris

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2020 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

New in the Shop – Amazing Cameras, Awesome Values!

Hi all!

We’ve added some really unique and hard to find cameras in our camera shop this week and we’re offering for the first time ever a 15% discount on almost everything in the shop – some with free shipping too! Visit the shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com

Thanks for stopping by and have a great day! – Chris

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2020 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

Macro Monday – simple but elegant machines

Yashica self-timer ca. 1955

yashica self-timer

Walz self-timer ca. 1957

walz self-timer

Canon self-timer 1953

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I say simple but still amazingly complex and elegant.

Thanks for stopping by and be sure to stop by my online camera shop hosted by Etsy at http://www.ccstudio2380.com – Chris

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2020 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

SUNday Spotlight! – Discovering some Fuji Fun

Fujifilm = Fuji Fun! Here’s a simple but fun to use point and shoot 35mm film camera from Fuji Photo Film Company – 1993. It’s hard to imagine that this camera is now over 25-years-old and it’s never been used.

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It features a Fujinon f8 34mm lens with 3 elements in 3 groups. The shutter operates from 1/40 to 1/600 of a second. Built-in automatic flash and of course, red-eye reduction.

The Discovery line from Fuji was very popular with a ton of models produced in the early 1990s. The Discovery 90 Date listed for ¥18,500 in 1993 (about $160 USD).

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It has some pretty nice features for such an easy to use camera.  That’s the original film that came with the set – it’s expired but still usable.

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I replaced the original CR2025 battery with a fresh one and reset the date.

These “Plastic Fantastic” cameras are a joy to use and with its Fujinon 34mm lens produced some quality images especially loaded with Fujicolor film.

Thanks for stopping by and have a fantastic Sunday! – Chris

http://www.ccstudio2380.com

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2020 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.