Canon Sure Shot Zoom S – S AF (1989)

Part of the “Modern Classics” series of our collection. This one is from mid 1993. One of the more sophisticated AF point and shoot (click) plastic fantastic 35mm cameras of the 1990s. There were two versions of this camera – this one, the Sure Shot Zoom S and the Sure Shot Caption Zoom (with removable remote control).

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As released from the factory – still new in the box.

The zooming range covers 38-60mm. Other features include auto focus, auto film load, advance wind, auto flash and auto macro. Canon claims it has an improved autofocus control – ‘Evaluative Active System’  that looks at the entire frame and recognizes the main subject based on its distance to the camera (sounds pretty standard to me). Anyway they made a big deal about it in the owner’s manual.

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The Canon lens is Spectra-coated and is constructed with 6 elements in 6 groups. I assume it’s glass.

Canon recommends using DX-coded film. The camera automatically sets ISO 50-3200. Non DX-coded film will set to ISO 100.

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Well placed shutter release button and large LCD. The auto flash feature can be turned off. What I found surprising was that there was no “Red Eye” reduction system available. Probably too early for that.

The Canon Sure Shot Zoom S features a 3-zone metering, AE programmed system that focuses from about 60cm to infinity. It uses one 6V lithium battery (2CR5) which is still readily available (I just purchased one for $7 with free shipping).

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Nice centered viewfinder that is bright and well marked. Super simple back with easy to find and use on-off button.

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The TILT lever is pretty cool – it has two positions when you pull it out. When setting the camera down on a flat surface (like a table) for taking selfies, it tilts the camera slightly upward so as not to get the table or whatever in the pic.

The camera is large for a point and shoot – weighs in at 384 grams with the battery and compared to the 1980 model Canon A-1 35mm SLR, almost as large!

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The Sure Shot is a large camera – it fits very nicely in my hands and feels solid. The buttons are all recessed so it does take a bit of finger olympics to push them all the way in. By the way, the A-1 with my FD 24mm lens weighs in at 934 grams!

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As you hear us say all the time, if you want to collect modern film cameras from the 1980s and 1990s, the best way is if you can find a complete original set, new in the box. Why not if they’re still out there and available. They don’t make them anymore and some of these cameras are quite capable of outstanding images – some would spend crazy money on the more well known cameras for almost unnoticeable differences in the final image (especially since most people don’t enlarge and print images anymore) and scanned to a PC they’ll look just fine on a high quality monitor.

Pick up one of these Sure Shots and I’m sure you’ll be impressed with it.

Studio Camera: Fujifilm FinePix S9900W

Chris

Yashica Half 17 – Classic mid 1960s design

Many thanks to our friend and fellow blogger Peggy at Camera Go Camera for sending us this wonderful classic Yashica. It needs a little work on the slower shutter speeds but it’s super clean and a fun sized camera to boot. We look forward to running a roll through it soon.

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Being a half frame 35mm camera means that you can get up to 72 exposures from a standard 36 exposure film cartridge!

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One of the more unique and modern looking Yashica logos. We like it better than the western style font that Yashica used for years.

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Certainly a nice camera to add any collection of 1960s 35mm cameras. It has such smooth lines and an exceptionally nice finish to the satin chrome.

Studio Camera: Fujifilm FinePix S9900W

Chris

Fujifilm Discovery S100 – 1999

Another Fuji for our “Modern Series” collection. Why collect plastic cameras from the 1990s? Because they’re out there and they’re still in the box new!

If you’re a collector of vintage camera equipment, how many times have you wished that you’d kept all the original boxes that came with your then new Canon, or Nikon or whatever? The old saying, “they don’t make them like they used to anymore” is as true today as it was 50 years ago. Yeah, in 2021 the original Canon F-1 will turn 50 years old! Amazing for me to think that I remember reading about the new F-1 in the photo mags of the day and looking for it at my favorite camera dealer’s shop. If only I had kept the boxes! If only I had bought two instead of just one and kept the second one locked away unused! Wow, that would be nice but it would have been a really bad return on my initial “investment”.

More to the point of this post. Someday these plastic fantastic, point and shoot 35mm compact cameras of the 1980s, 1990s and even the 2000s, will be worth collecting. Notice I didn’t say “worth something”. It’s a chance to have a collection of cameras that represented some pretty amazing technological breakthroughs of their era. And if you start collecting them now, you’ll be able to still get them absolutely new in the box unused. We happen to find collecting these inexpensive cameras a whole lot of fun – it’s like Christmas morning never ends!

Here’s our latest find –

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From 1999 – this little Fuji came as part of a neat kit that included a fresh roll of Fujicolor, a case and coupons for up to $10 off on film and processing.

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Toys

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When the lens cover is slid open the flash automatically pops up.

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Takes 2 AA batteries and a flat watch battery (CR2025).

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Original battery still going strong 17 years into the future!

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Super nice case and a fresh roll of Superia that expired in 2000.

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Fuji Photo Film Company made millions of these type of cameras in the 1980s and 90s. Finding them still in the box new is what makes collecting them fun.

“Tech Specs” – Fujinon Lens 32mm, f/ 4.5, 3 elements in 3 groups – autofocus 1 meter to ∞ – programmed electronic shutter (1/30 to 1/250 sec) – DX coding – auto film advance and auto rewind – built-in flash – self-timer – date function – about 185g

Oh and the date function is good up until 2049! No worries there!

Studio Camera: Fujifilm FinePix S9900W

Chris

 

 

 

Yashica-A: Collecting 101*

*Or how to run out of space for it all real quick!

As much as Carol and I would love to go on collecting camera sets, the cameras will eventually win out! Even when we narrow our collecting to let’s say only twin-lens reflex cameras made in the mid 1950s, and only made by Yashima-Yashica, we’d still run out of space and money. There were just too many made (obviously) to be able to collect all the different models and all the different variations. Yashima-Yashica was, by far, the most prolific TLR maker – ever! I believe they finally stopped by 1986 which was long after TLRs fell from favor!

So we’ve reached the point they sing about in that Disney movie – “Let it Go”! 

Collecting Yashima-Yashica cameras is a very satisfying endeavor. We’ve been at it for decades, we know. There’s enough of them around so the choices are plenty – but since Yashicas were built well but built for the masses, they weren’t collected when they were new. Most that are available are well used. They’re still very functional, but well used nonetheless. So if you’re trying to collect complete sets just as they came from the factory, and you want them to work and be in mint (or near mint) condition, good luck! It’s not like collecting Leicas, Nikons, Canons or Rolleis where when you google “nikon mint box” you end up with hundreds to pick from from all across the web. Google “mint yashica box” and you’ll see maybe a dozen of Yashica’s last TLR – the Mat 124G. A great camera but it’s common. The early stuff from Yashima-Yashica, well that’s a whole different ballgame, and that ballgame is fun!

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This one is from 1957,  made by Yashima Optical – the Yashica-A

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Solidly built and well maintained.

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All the factory goodies.

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“Fall out of bed” easy to operate – shoot 6x6cm negatives or color slide film soon after loading it. Great optics, accurate shutter and bright viewing screen.

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Yashimar f/ 3.5, 80mm lenses made by Tomioka Optical.

The Yashica-A is a great medium format camera. Simple to use and produces super sharp, large images that you’ll be amazed came from your hands. Why is the A the best? This one is 6 decades old and works perfectly. Why? Virtually nothing on it to break or jam. Simple winding knob, no self-timer and black yarn light seals that never fail. No built-in light meter (use a phone app) or use a vintage hand held meter or guess at the exposure or learn the “Sunny-16” rule. You almost have to try to make a bad image with a camera like this. Worried about the reversed image in the viewing hood? You’ll get over it quickly and you’ll soon love composing and shooting in the square format (6 x 6).

This model A (remember, “Let it Go”) is available for purchase. If you have an interest, contact us at chriscarol@ccstudio2380.com or visit us at http://www.ccstudio2380.com

If there’s something that you’re looking for maybe we have it or can find one for you. You never know!

Thanks for stopping by!

Studio Camera: Fujifilm FinePix S9900W

Chris

 

 

Yashica Half 17 – by Camera Go Camera

Always interesting camera and equipment reviews with excellent photography to boot!

Camera Go Camera

When I saw this camera, I thought…REALLY??? A Yashica half frame? I hate half-frames, but I love Yashicas. Should I buy it? It isn’t cheap for a junk bin chance, but it is clean and a Yashica…OK, I will do it.

According to this reviewer it was produced in 1964. As you can see it has a selenium cell light meter and a f1.7 lens. It has zone focusing with an image scale inside the viewfinder that has the regular mountain, people, person symbols. On the right side of the view finder is a needle scale that tells you the speed. So you can choose the aperture and check what speed will be selected by the camera. Or everything can be automatic. When you press the shutter button half way, the needle moves…and this one did, which let me know the selenium cell was working 🙂 A good sign. Here…

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