Nicca Type-5 35mm Rangefinder Camera – 1955

The Nicca Camera Company was well known during the 1950s as producing high-quality Leica inspired 35mm rangefinder cameras often of better quality than what Leica produced.

The Nicca Type-5 was released in March 1955 and it was the first Nicca camera to feature a rear film door that opened from a hinge on the right side of the body. This made it easier to load film as the film path was accessible directly from the rear. It was the only Nicca to open this way until a top-hinged model was introduced with the release of the Nicca 5-L (the L added a lever film winding lever).

Nicca Type 5

Another feature of this Nicca is the added high-speed shutter which has a top speed of 1/1000 of a second.

The film back (rear cover) is side-hinged which is a unique feature of the Nicca Type-5.

Nicca T 5

From the front, an easy way to identify the Type-5 is by the black band that runs around the body just above the leatherette.

Nicca Ty 5

The film cassette is inserted on the left side of the camera and the film leader is drawn across the shutter curtain and is wound around the take-up spool on the right side. When the rear cover is closed the film pressure plate will keep the film flat. In the above picture, the bottom plate is reversed from its mounted position.

Nicca T5 apart

Another feature of the Type-5 is that the film door can be removed for even better access to the camera’s interior to facilitate film loading. The film take-up spool is on the far right.

The Type-5 is not a common Nicca today although it appears that nearly 6,500 were made during its run based on the thought that the serial numbers ran consecutively with no breaks in production. The earliest serial found is 125001 which is the camera depicted in the instruction book and the latest serial number found in the wild is 131531. My camera depicted here has a serial number of 130109.

Here’s an ad from May 1955 for the Type-5.

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The advertisement is dated May 1955 which is a few months after the initially reported release date of March 1955. The distributor’s name is Hinomaruya ひのまるや which can be seen just below the Nicca name on the lower right of the ad.

For more, much more, please check out my good friend Paul Sokk’s wonderful site. 

Thanks for stopping by and please visit our camera shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com – Chris

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2019 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

 

 

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Happy SUNday! – Funky Kodak

Funky Kodak Movie

A Kodak 8mm movie camera from 1938.

Thanks for stopping by and have a beautiful day! – Chris

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2019 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

Macro Monday – Monster Glass

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One of the finest fast lenses ever – well pretty close anyway. Made by Tomioka Optical for Yashica (and others) this ultra-fast 55mm f/1.2 lens is a perfect match for the Yashica TL Electro X ITS that it’s mounted on.

Thanks for stopping by! – Chris

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2019 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

Happy SUNday! – Mickey Mouse Camera

Carol and I enjoy collecting interesting cameras from all over the world and we’re die-hard Disney fans too. So combining the two has always been fun for us.

The original Fuji DL-7 was released in Japan in April 1987 – the Fuji DL-7 Mickey Mouse in November 1987. The “DL” meant drop-in film loading. There were over thirty cameras in the popular Fuji DL series.

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Here’s a Hi! Mickey! 35mm point and shoot camera set from Fuji Photo Film Company. The camera is a Fuji DL-7 with some enhancements from Disney.

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Mickey’s smiling face acts as a sliding lens cover for the Fujinon f/8 35mm 3 element lens. When closed it locks the shutter button. Fujifilm / Fuji has enjoyed a long relationship with the Walt Disney Company and there have been more than a few Mickey Mouse cameras over the years.

mickey dl7 brochure

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As we continue to downsize our camera collection we’re offering this wonderful set in our camera shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com

Thanks for stopping by! – Chris

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2019 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

Happy SUNday! – Black, Silver & Fire

Yashica J3s and book

The book is ‘A Day in the Life of Japan’ published in 1985. The image is of a Buddhist monk illuminated by the burning of prayer sticks. Original image by Matthew Naythons and was taken on Mount Hiei near Kyoto.

Yashica J3 on book

Yashica J-3 single-lens reflex 35mm camera from 1962. Satin chrome finish contrasts nicely with the black leatherette. The lens is a Tomioka Optical made Auto Yashinon f/ 2.0 5cm beauty.

Yashica J3 black on book

A rather rare camera as it is Yashica’s first pro-black body in a 35mm SLR. Uses a CdS exposure meter located behind the small ‘light-gathering lens’ on the camera’s upper left side. The taking lens is gorgeous… super smooth focus and as clear as a bell. Made by Tomioka Optical of Tokyo for Yashica… Auto Yashinon 5cm f/ 2.0
Bonus pieces include the original black metal lens cap and Yashica lens shade.

The book, ‘A Day in the Life of Japan’ published in 1985 and printed in Japan, contains hundreds of images all taken on the same day on 7 June 1985. If you have a chance to find this book it is a fantastic documentation of the people and places of modern Japan.

Thanks for stopping by! Chris

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2019 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

 

 

Happy SUNday! – Trying out my new old lens.

Bunches of old lenses + a mirrorless digital camera + a bevy of lens adapters = lots of fun!

Fujifilm X-A10 with Nikkor

Fujifilm X-A10. One of Fuji’s most affordable mirrorless cameras mated with my cherished Nippon Kogaku Nikkor-H.C f/2 5cm lens from around 1956 or so. The adapter is from Fotodiox.

Fujifilm X-A10 w Nikkor 2

The adapter was about $17 direct from Fotodiox (that included shipping). The adapters from Fotodiox are of excellent quality and their customer service has been exceptional. M39 allows you to use Leica type screw-in lenses (L39) made by a variety of lens makers back in the day.

The results (so far). I’m pretty happy with the contrast, sharpness, and colors that the lens captures. Using vintage glass can be a lot of fun!

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About f/11

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f/5.6

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f/8

About the trickiest part of using vintage manual focus lenses of a modern digital mirrorless camera is achieving an accurate focus in bright sunlight. Most of my focusing is guessing at the distance and knowing my depth of field limitations. On my Fujifilm X-Series camera, I set the exposure dial to aperture priority, select manual focus, set my ISO, then set the desired aperture on my lens and monitor the shutter speed selected by the camera.

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Focused at infinity at f/16

None of these images received significant post production – pretty much as captured and certainly no cropping. Below is a different Nikkor lens that has a case of fungus.

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Here’s another Nikkor-H.C f/2 5cm lens with significant fungus on the last internal lens element(s). Other than the fungus the lens is in mint condition.

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Same kitty different results. By using a digital adapter I can quickly test a lens and decide if it’s worth getting the lens serviced.

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Here’s a different adapter made for a Sony E-mount body mirrorless camera.

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Fotodiox adapter for mounting Canon FD lenses to my Fuji.

If you haven’t tried using an adapter for your old manual focus lenses you’re missing out on a bunch of fun. They’re inexpensive and you’ll probably like the “look” the vintage glass gives your images.

Thanks for stopping by and be sure to visit my camera shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com – Chris

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2019 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

 

New In the Shop – 10.10.2019

Lots of goodies were added to my camera shop this week as I continue to list items from my personal collection and some recent acquisitions from other collectors.

My shop is always open and can be found at http://www.ccstudio2380.com

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The Sony tripod is in mint condition and it’s rather cool – it features a built-in remote control right in the handle! The Nikon F book is from 1971 and it’s also in mint condition – these are getting much harder to find this nice after all these years.

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The Fujifilm Fuji DL-7 is awesome as it’s still brand new in the box – never used! The Fuji Zoom Cardia is as close to an SLR slayer that you can get in a 35mm compact point and shoot camera. How about the Minolta Six medium format camera from around 1936! It’s the very first one to carry the Minolta name.

Lots more to see in the shop so pop on over to http://www.ccstudio2380.com

Thanks for stopping by! – Chris

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2019 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

 

Happy SUNday! – Silly Cool!

Under the heading of silly cool things to add to my collection, this one definitely fills the bill. Available during Expo ’70 which was held in Osaka, Japan between March and December 1970.

YSB Patch 1970

The “badge” is about 3 x 3 inches and is sewn onto a felt back with a pin for quick attachment.

Yashica was still promoting its first generation of electronic cameras in 1970. The famous Yashica TL Electro-X first hit the market in October 1968. The Electro 35 came out in 1966.

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The original Yashica Sailor Boy on the left (1962) and his undated cousin on the right. My best guess is that the guy with the camera was fashioned after ‘Wee Willie Winkie’ spreading the word about Yashica’s new camera (the Electro 35) in this case. The sleeping cap, the slippers and his hand up to his mouth (not ear) to better shout the news.

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I’m at a loss to explain the whys behind the apparent clown costume in this case. I get the partial reference to the previous Wee Willie Winkie design but can’t even begin to imagine why Yashica’s marketing folks took away his original sailor suit. This little figurine was pretty popular during the 1960s and 70s as the Sailor Boy was made in a wide variety of sizes from small 4 inch models up to a nearly 24-inch dealer model.

yashica www

Yashica’s possible inspiration. There are enough similarities to suggest that Yashica’s Sailor Boy was modeled after WWW.

yashica sailor boy big

Large dealer display model. I had the opportunity to acquire this guy a short time ago but apparently, I missed out.

Anyway, happy Sunday to all! – Chris

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2019 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.