New In the Shop – 11.30.2019

Hi all! Here’s a small sample of what I have on sale in my camera shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com

I ship nearly worldwide and I ship super fast. All items are from my collection of vintage (and not so vintage) cameras and photogear that I’ve collected over the years.

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My shop is always open at http://www.ccstudio2380.com

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If you’re looking for something specific let me know what it is and I may have it or can get it for you! Contact me at ccphotographyai@gmail.com

I’ll be listing some additional classic and rare cameras in the coming days so check out my shop often at http://www.ccstudio2380.com

Thanks for stopping by! – Chris

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2019 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

Japan Air Lines Flight Bag – 1960s

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Kinda hard to find all red JAL vinyl flight bag with the classic tsurumaru (circle crane) design. Back in the 1950s and 1960s, these types of travel bags were very popular as most of the major airlines had their logos proudly displayed.
The JAL red-crown crane logo was first designed in 1958 and was used until 1989.

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The all-red JAL flight bag is one of the harder ones to find still in good condition. Most JAL bags were red with white sides or blue with white sides.

BOAC Bag

PanAm Bag

TWA Bag

Nothing says 1960s travel like these super cool flight bags. Thanks for stopping by! – Chris

Nicca Type-5 35mm Rangefinder Camera – 1955

The Nicca Camera Company was well known during the 1950s as producing high-quality Leica inspired 35mm rangefinder cameras often of better quality than what Leica produced.

The Nicca Type-5 was released in March 1955 and it was the first Nicca camera to feature a rear film door that opened from a hinge on the right side of the body. This made it easier to load film as the film path was accessible directly from the rear. It was the only Nicca to open this way until a top-hinged model was introduced with the release of the Nicca 5-L (the L added a film winding lever vice dial shown here).

Nicca Type 5

Another feature of this Nicca is the added high-speed shutter which has a top speed of 1/1000 of a second.

The film back (rear cover) is side-hinged which is a unique feature of the Nicca Type-5.

Nicca T 5

From the front, an easy way to identify the Type-5 is by the black band that runs around the body just above the leatherette.

Nicca Ty 5

The film cassette is inserted on the left side of the camera and the film leader is drawn across the shutter curtain and is wound around the take-up spool on the right side. When the rear cover is closed the film pressure plate will keep the film flat. In the above picture, the bottom plate is reversed from its mounted position.

Nicca T5 apart

Another feature of the Type-5 is that the film door can be removed for even better access to the camera’s interior to facilitate film loading. The film take-up spool is on the far right.

The Type-5 is not a common Nicca today although it appears that nearly 6,500 were made during its run based on the thought that the serial numbers ran consecutively with no breaks in production. The earliest serial found is 125001 which is the camera depicted in the instruction book and the latest serial number found in the wild is 131531. My camera depicted here has a serial number of 130109.

Here’s an ad from May 1955 for the Type-5.

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The advertisement is dated May 1955 which is a few months after the initially reported release date of March 1955. The distributor’s name is Hinomaruya ひのまるや which can be seen just below the Nicca name on the lower right of the ad. Scan courtesy of Paul Sokk.

For more, much more, please check out my good friend Paul Sokk’s wonderful site. 

Thanks for stopping by and please visit our camera shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com – Chris

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2019 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

 

 

Happy SUNday! – Mickey Mouse Camera

Carol and I enjoy collecting interesting cameras from all over the world and we’re die-hard Disney fans too. So combining the two has always been fun for us.

The original Fuji DL-7 was released in Japan in April 1987 – the Fuji DL-7 Mickey Mouse in November 1987. The “DL” meant drop-in film loading. There were over thirty cameras in the popular Fuji DL series.

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Here’s a Hi! Mickey! 35mm point and shoot camera set from Fuji Photo Film Company. The camera is a Fuji DL-7 with some enhancements from Disney.

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Mickey’s smiling face acts as a sliding lens cover for the Fujinon f/8 35mm 3 element lens. When closed it locks the shutter button. Fujifilm / Fuji has enjoyed a long relationship with the Walt Disney Company and there have been more than a few Mickey Mouse cameras over the years.

mickey dl7 brochure

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As we continue to downsize our camera collection we’re offering this wonderful set in our camera shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com

Thanks for stopping by! – Chris

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2019 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

New In the Shop – 11.8.2019

Hello all! Lots of new items have been added to my camera shop this week which can be visited at http://www.ccstudio2380.com – everything is on sale and some come with FREE USA SHIPPING!

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Thanks for stopping by and feel free to check out my entire inventory at http://www.ccstudio2380.com – Thanks, Chris

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2019 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

random scans from Japan

Every now and again I’ll find the time to scan a bunch of camera brochures for easy future reference. Here’s my latest batch fresh from Japan.

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Buy, sell, build or renovate your home!

Tokyu Lines, Minatomiral Line Route Map (current).

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Canon AE-1 Instruction Book (below) from March 1981. Definitely a different cover from the English Edition.

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Asahi Pentax Slide 501 (below) automatic 35mm slide projector/viewer. No date on the brochure but I’m guessing that it was released in the mid to late 1970s (around the time of the Pentax ME).

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From inside the brochure a rather surprising graphic. Can you imagine if something like this was inside your Kodak slide projector instructions in the US??? But Japan takes a more mature approach to nudity and the graphic is quite funny to see the reactions on the catoons faces.

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The Minolta TC-1 (below) from a brochure dated 1999. The TC-1 is a compact point and shoot 35mm film camera that still commands a strong price in the used market. Mint and near mint examples regularly sell from $800 to $1,200 USD on sites like eBay and Yahoo Japan Auction.

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The brochure that I scanned this from shows a list price of  ¥148,000 and an actual selling price of ¥122,000 (about $1,140 USD).

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28mm G-Rokkor f/3.5 lens – kinda slow for the money IMO.

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Fujifilm X-T1 / X-T10 brochure dated May 2015.

Nikon F80 (N80 in the US) brochure dated August 29, 2001.

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Fujifilm X-Pro2

Thanks for stopping by and some of these brochures can be found in my camera shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com – Chris

New In the Shop – 10.17.19

Lots of new items in the shop this week and some old favorites. As always, my camera shop can be found 24/7 at http://www.ccstudio2380.com

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My shop can be found at http://www.ccstudio2380.com and if there’s something specific that you’re looking for let me know what it is by dropping me a line at ccphotographyai@gmail.com

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Everything is on sale at 10% off plus there’s free shipping on some items too! Most everything that’s in my shop is kinda rare and in mint new condition. Check back often as I continue to add cameras and gear from my personal collection.

Thanks, Chris

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2019 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

Happy SUNday! – Trying out my new old lens.

Bunches of old lenses + a mirrorless digital camera + a bevy of lens adapters = lots of fun!

Fujifilm X-A10 with Nikkor

Fujifilm X-A10. One of Fuji’s most affordable mirrorless cameras mated with my cherished Nippon Kogaku Nikkor-H.C f/2 5cm lens from around 1956 or so. The adapter is from Fotodiox.

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The adapter was about $17 direct from Fotodiox (that included shipping). The adapters from Fotodiox are of excellent quality and their customer service has been exceptional. M39 allows you to use Leica type screw-in lenses (L39) made by a variety of lens makers back in the day.

The results (so far). I’m pretty happy with the contrast, sharpness, and colors that the lens captures. Using vintage glass can be a lot of fun!

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About f/11

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f/5.6

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f/8

About the trickiest part of using vintage manual focus lenses of a modern digital mirrorless camera is achieving an accurate focus in bright sunlight. Most of my focusing is guessing at the distance and knowing my depth of field limitations. On my Fujifilm X-Series camera, I set the exposure dial to aperture priority, select manual focus, set my ISO, then set the desired aperture on my lens and monitor the shutter speed selected by the camera.

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Focused at infinity at f/16

None of these images received significant post production – pretty much as captured and certainly no cropping. Below is a different Nikkor lens that has a case of fungus.

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Here’s another Nikkor-H.C f/2 5cm lens with significant fungus on the last internal lens element(s). Other than the fungus the lens is in mint condition.

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Same kitty different results. By using a digital adapter I can quickly test a lens and decide if it’s worth getting the lens serviced.

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Here’s a different adapter made for a Sony E-mount body mirrorless camera.

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Fotodiox adapter for mounting Canon FD lenses to my Fuji.

If you haven’t tried using an adapter for your old manual focus lenses you’re missing out on a bunch of fun. They’re inexpensive and you’ll probably like the “look” the vintage glass gives your images.

Thanks for stopping by and be sure to visit my camera shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com – Chris

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2019 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

 

Time Capsule – 1960

Another look at this post from last year. New evidence shows that the Pentamatic (original model) was released in Japan in January 1960 but as of this reblog still no instruction booklets found printed in Japanese – only English. The Pentamatic made its first appearance in the US around March-April 1960 with the first ads appearing in May.

Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic

yashica pentamatic set The original Pentamatic.

A nice example of Yashica’s first 35mm SLR – the Pentamatic. Also known as the Pentamatic ’35’ in its earliest advertisements and sales brochures. This particular camera is from August 1960 – the same month that Yashica started production of the Pentamatic II – a model that was destined for the Japanese home market and not for world export. The Pentamatic II stayed in production only until January 1961 when it was replaced a few months later with the Pentamatic S. The original Pentamatic was first produced in December 1959 but widescale production didn’t begin until January 1960. As of this update (Oct 11, 2018), I still haven’t found evidence of an instruction booklet printed in Japanese – only English booklets so far. I would think that there must be booklets in Japanese and at least 2 or 3 other languages but none found. The Pentamatic II…

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