Friday Fotos!

Pontiac NY

My Mom and Dad’s favorite tree and oh, by the way, their new car! A sleek looking 1949 Pontiac Chieftain coupe at a park in New York City in the early 1950s. I’m not sure which one was responsible for the photo gaff but its a great shot anyway.

Mom and Car

Mom posing in their new Pontiac. Taken by my Dad with Mom’s Kodak 620.

Thanks for stopping by and have a great day and weekend! – Chris

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2019 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

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Nicca 3-F Camera Case – first of its kind?

I know, this is not an overly exciting post – rather obscure actually.

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Nicca 3-F ‘Snap Shot Case’.

The Nicca 3-F was one of many well-built 35mm rangefinder cameras produced by Nicca Camera Company in the late 1950s. Nicca would be acquired by Yashica in early 1958 and some of the technology that Nicca possessed went to Yashica in the deal. The acquisition directly led to the development of Yashica’s first 35mm SLR, the Pentamatic in late 1959. I digress.

My good friend Paul Sokk (www.yashicatlr.com) recently shared this scan of an instruction booklet he acquired for his Nicca. What struck me as I translated (actually an app on my phone translated it) is how this camera case was constructed.

Here’s the translation: “The snap shot case uses a brown box skin and comes with a shoulder strap as an accessory. It is glued, and the case of the stringer does not use any adhesive. Moreover, it has sufficient strength against external force (especially the projection of the lens part). Recently, there are those who use the camera out of the case and naked, but since it is likely that the camera is often hurt, it is recommended to put it in the case and use it as much as possible”.

I hadn’t noticed Nicca cases before this one that did not use stitching. Why is that important? On most vintage (40-year-old or more) cases the stitching has long since failed and the case falls apart. It will be interesting to see if these glued cases stood the test of time and in better condition than their stitched cousins.

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A close-up view of a glued case.

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Typical stitched case.

Thanks for stopping by! – Chris

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2019 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

Happy SUNday! – Lionel Trains

A few peeks at some of my Lionel trains from the 1950s and 1960s. These trains saw some action!

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“O” gauge locomotive.

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He actually moved the milk cans onto a platform. Super cool!

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Some random billboard ads of the day.

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The 1960s missile train car – yep, the roof opened and a missile would fire – toy armageddon!

All of my trains have been sold off to various collectors. I just have the pics and great memories of playing with them with my dad.

Camera: Sony Cyber-shot DSC-W170

Have a beautiful day! – Chris

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2019 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

Tripod Mystery

Yashica sold a line of excellent tripods in the late 1950s and ’60s which I always assumed were in fact made by Yashica. The ones that I own are of high quality and functionality and are a source of pride in my Yashica collection. Oh, there were moments of doubt when I would ask myself why a major camera maker like Yashica would “mess around” with something as small as a tripod when there were more important things to make. I guess one could argue that since Yashica already possessed machinery and forging capabilities why not make some branded tripods to sell alongside your cameras.

But it seems unlikely to me that someone who had just purchased a Canon or Nikon camera would then go on to buy a Yashica branded tripod unless there was something unique about it or it was a better value over the others. The marketplace during this time period was flooded with inexpensive tripods from an array of sellers. Why bother making something that has a slim profit margin? But who really made these tripods? I don’t have the answers to those questions yet but it’s been a fun little discovery up to this point. Here’s a look at something I thought was uniquely Yashica.

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The Yashica MY-15 tripod from the late 1950s

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A wonderful little gem of engineering from Yashica – but is it?

It doesn’t take much of an imagination to see that these three tripods are related.

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The Yashica MY-15 far left, the Manon center and the Velbon Deluxe far right.

The Manon claims to be the model 400 but that’s hasn’t been verified by me yet. It’s an exact match to the Yashica except for the legs being black. The Velbon is marked “V” and “Deluxe” but I’ve also seen them without the “V”. It’s an almost exact match to the other two except the center elevator shaft is round vice triangular.

So my question is who really made these? Velbon was founded in Japan in 1955 and was primarily a tripod maker. They’re still going strong today and make a wide array of tripods. Yashica was acquired by Kyocera in the early 1980s and then promptly killed Yashica. I believe Manon no longer exists.

So, did Yashica make their MY-15 tripod for the others? Unlikely as that wasn’t their core activity then. Manon could be a player as tripods were right up their alley. But my best guess ATM is that the model MY-15 that Yashica sold was made for them by Velbon. Companies such as Gold-Crest, Holmar, Bogen, Sunset, Vivo and countless others could have been the makers too but these three are the only perfect matches so far.

Have you got a tripod that looks like one of these but it’s branded by another company? Please let me know as I’d love to find more. Thanks

Thanks for stopping by! – Chris

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2019 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

Fungus Among Us – “Is that a snow globe in your lens”?

A nice Nikkor lens from around 1951. When a lens is stored improperly you get a snow globe.

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I’m calling it fungus but I don’t see the typical filaments associated with fungus. Mold tends to be spotty. Haze is, well hazy. This whiteout is on the surface of the last internal lens element and is not reachable without a teardown of the lens. I’m sending this one off to a professional camera and lens repair service shortly. No promises made but for $90 its worth a try. The lens is in nearly mint condition otherwise.

The seller did offer a refund of $40 on my purchase to help with the repair costs which was appreciated. A lot of problems could be averted by simply shining a bright LED light through a lens before listing it. But this lens is on a rangefinder camera so simply looking through the range/viewfinder wouldn’t have spotted these issues.

Below is a scan of a page from the Sears Camera Catalog from Fall 1952. It goes into an extensive background of the Nikkor lenses that were available for the Tower 35 – aka Nicca Type-3.

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I’ll let you know how it looks when it’s back from service. Thanks for stopping by! – Chris

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2018 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

Historic Advertising Flyer – 1958

I’ll say 1958 because it looks like it was produced shortly after Yashima-Yashica acquired the Nicca Camera Co., Ltd. in May 1958. As best as I can tell this is the one and only time that a piece of advertising contained all three key players in the Nicca III-L. Nicca, Nikkor (Nikon), and Yashica. The address at the bottom of the page matches the address that Yashica used in 1958-1959.

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My translation app has the address as 1-8 Nihonbashi, Muromachi, Chuo-ku, Tokyo

The lenses for the Nicca cameras were almost exclusively supplied by Nikon and branded as Nikkor. Since this was a transition time (end of the line) for Nicca, this flyer clearly indicates that Yashica is the new player in the picture. Yashica would operate Nicca as Taiho Optical Company for a period of time with at least a few lenses getting produced with that brand name on the lens.

Yashica eventually (in well less than a year) started to supply lenses with the Yashinon name for these Nicca-Yashica crossover models. It’s not clear if these lenses were made for Yashica by an outside company such as Tomioka or that they may have been made by the newly acquired Nicca operating under their new name Taiho. There are at least a few Nicca branded lenses that I’ve seen so it’s not an impossible thought.

As always, thanks for your visit. Do you have something to add? I’d love to hear and see anything related to this dynamic period in Yashica’s history. – Chris

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2018 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

Yashica Catalog from 1958

We’ve recently acquired a rather rare catalog from around 1958 – I think early 1958 as Yashica was still Yashima Optical at the time of the printing. It’s a large format catalog with practically everything Yashica offered at the time.

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Just a small sample of what’s inside. We love collecting these catalogs and brochures from Yashima-Yashica’s early days.

Thanks for stopping by!

Chris

Happy SUNday!

Happy SUNday and Happy New Year!

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From my train collection that’s now gone.

Lionel Santa Fe ‘O’ gauge F3 diesel locomotive from 1958

Chris

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2017 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

Yashima Flex – 1954

Yashica’s first twin-lens reflex (TLR) camera to bear the company name – Yashica was Yashima at its founding. The Yashica name wasn’t adopted for the company until 1958.

This Yashima Flex is as close to its original condition as one could hope for. It’s fully functional and a joy to use.

Yashima Flex with film logo

A beauty from the craftspeople at Yashima – Nagano Prefecture, Japan.

Thanks for stopping by! If you’re interested in purchasing classic cameras, please visit our e-commerce store at https://www.ccstudio2380.com

You can visit our gallery of photographs at https://500px.com/yashicachris

Some of our art prints can be found at https://society6.com/ccstudio2380

We’re also active buyers of classic photogear – contact us at chriscarol@ccstudio2380.com

Chris

Please respect that all content, including photos and text are property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2017 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

Nicca 3-S on location

1950s vintage Nicca rangefinder 35mm camera shot on location – c1911 post office.

Nicca at PO

After a day spent on a photowalk in our local historic district, our Nicca takes a break for a beauty shot. The mid afternoon lighting is always just right in this 100 year old post office – the table once held ink wells (the hole behind the camera) and the wood table top has such a wonderful patina and texture.

Our Nicca 3-S is fully operational – it’s considered to be one of the best Leica copy cameras produced in Japan in the early part of the 1950s. The 5cm f/ 2 lens is made by Nikon and is clear and sharp.

Of interest, the <E.P> mark on the rewind knob (extreme left) indicates that this camera was available for sale in Japan as an exempt purchase, meaning that it was for sale only to military personnel and their families, diplomatic personnel and their families and possibly available at duty free shops. Photogear marked with the <E.P> symbol was not for sale to Japanese citizens as it was tax exempt.

Thanks for your visit!

Chris

Shameless plug – stop by our e-commerce shop at https://www.ccstudio2380.com for more great and interesting stuff! ^.^

Please respect that all content, including photos and text are property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2017 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.