Film Test – Fujicolor Superia

I’m ready to test my classic Nikon L35AF 35mm camera with a fresh roll of my favorite color negative film (almost forgot to change the ASA). The film is now on its way to the lab. Stay tuned. Thanks for stopping by, Chris

Step one.
Oh, the excitement of a fresh roll of film in a classic camera.

Follow me on Instagram at @ccphotographyai

Comments are always welcomed as I’ve learned quite a bit from reader feedback. As always, thanks for stopping by, and while you’re at it, feel free to visit my camera shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com (CC Design Studios hosted by Etsy). – Chris Whelan

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, is this blog’s property and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris, Chasing Classic Cameras with Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2023 Chasing Classic Cameras with Chris (Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic), Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

Nikon L25AF vs One Touch (AF3)

Round one – weight.

Nikon L35AF – 1983
Nikon One Touch (AF3) – 1987

Both cameras were weighed with their respective batteries installed but with no film. There appears to be more metal in the L35AF and of course, the lens is a five element lens (not sure how much of a difference there is between a 5 element and 4 element lens). The One Touch has much more plastic but it still feels quite solid.

Round two – size.

The One Touch is a bit wider than the L35AF and certainly more modern looking.
Nikon classics.

Since both cameras are considered to be compact point & shoot models from the same manufacturer I don’t think the size was a consideration. There’s a four-year gap between the two so I’ll guess the difference in weight is the amount of metal used and the advancement in electronics minimization. I haven’t run a roll of film through the L35AF yet but I’ve used two different One Touch cameras and enjoyed using them.

Thanks for stopping by, Chris

Follow me on Instagram at @ccphotographyai

Comments are always welcomed as I’ve learned quite a bit from reader feedback. As always, thanks for stopping by, and while you’re at it, feel free to visit my camera shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com (CC Design Studios hosted by Etsy). – Chris Whelan

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, is this blog’s property and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris, Chasing Classic Cameras with Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2023 Chasing Classic Cameras with Chris (Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic), Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

Coming soon, Nikon One Touch (AF3)

Complete set from 1987 – mint in its original box – film tested.

Testing is complete now I’m just waiting for the lab to send me my scans. It could be in my Etsy shop this weekend. Visit http://www.ccstudio2380.com to see. Thanks for stopping by, Chris

Follow me on Instagram at @ccphotographyai

Comments are always welcomed as I’ve learned quite a bit from reader feedback. As always, thanks for stopping by, and while you’re at it, feel free to visit my camera shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com (CC Design Studios hosted by Etsy). – Chris Whelan

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, is this blog’s property and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris, Chasing Classic Cameras with Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2023 Chasing Classic Cameras with Chris (Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic), Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

Yashica MF-2 Super DX with AM Radio

A unique pairing to be sure. This is the original MF-2 Super made by Kyocera in 1986, not the current model being sold by the “new” and not associated with the real Yashica company in China.

Sharp Yashica 38mm lens (3 elements, 3 groups).
Includes the rare Yashica AM Receiver MF-2S which gets its power from the camera.

This is the last Yashica “Plastic Fantastic” still new in its original box in my collection. I’ve enjoyed collecting these neat Yashicas over the years but as I get older I realize the value of sharing my collection with others. It’s in my online camera shop hosted by Etsy at http://www.ccstudio2380.com.

Thanks for stopping by, Chris

Follow me on Instagram at @ccphotographyai

Comments are always welcomed as I’ve learned quite a bit from reader feedback. As always, thanks for stopping by, and while you’re at it, feel free to visit my camera shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com (CC Design Studios hosted by Etsy). – Chris Whelan

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, is this blog’s property and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris, Chasing Classic Cameras with Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2023 Chasing Classic Cameras with Chris (Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic), Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

Fernandina’s Finest

Nikon One Touch L35 AF3 35mm camera with Nikon f/2.8 35mm lens.

Another test image from my Nikon One Touch L35 AF3 compact 35mm film camera – point-and-shoot excellence. Fujicolor Superia X-TRA 400 color negative film. No post-processing. The negatives were scanned at the lab.

Nikon One Touch AF3 – 1987

Thanks for stopping by, Chris

Follow me on Instagram at @ccphotographyai

Comments are always welcomed as I’ve learned quite a bit from reader feedback. As always, thanks for stopping by, and while you’re at it, feel free to visit my camera shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com (CC Design Studios hosted by Etsy). – Chris Whelan

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, is this blog’s property and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris, Chasing Classic Cameras with Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2022 Chasing Classic Cameras with Chris (Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic), Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

Fresh from the garden – Konica Tomato!

We love collecting cameras that we perceive as “fun” or unusual and this wonderful camera from Konica is that and more. A couple of other cameras that I’d put in this category are the Fuji Pet and the Konica Kanpai (Kanpa!). How could you not fall in love with this cute little Tomato at first sight?

We love the glossy bright red finish and of course, the cute logo but the Tomato is more than just a pretty face. The store display card is a nice bonus and a reminder of just how much the camera set cost back in 1985 (about $99) and the case another $10.

If you’ve been a follower of our blog you undoubtedly know just how much we enjoy collecting cameras that come with their original boxes and have all of the goodies that came with them when new.

We’ve added the Fujicolor film for, well, color! The box looks like it came from the produce department of your local grocery store. Well done Konica!
It’s all there – a user’s guide, service guide, warranty/registration card, and a neat brochure on how to join the Sakura Film Club.
It comes with this super cool camera case that was an accessory when new.
Some specs. Features a fixed focus 35mm f/4 Konica lens (multicoated, 4 elements/4 groups) which I believe is glass. Selectable ISO settings of 100, 200, and 400, and on the left, a switch for using the flash when the subject is between 1.5 to 2 meters from the camera. The flash can be turned on and off which wasn’t a typical feature with compact point & shoot cameras during the 1980s.

The body of the camera is finished in a smooth glossy red and even though it’s plastic it’s a high grade of plastic that doesn’t feel cheap or flimsy in your hand. Another nice feature is the sliding lens cover that is also quite stout, unlike some other designs that feel like they’ll break after a few uses.

Auto Date – what’s up with that? Shown here with the time display (14:41 = 2:41 PM). The date display is accurate up to December 31, 2019. The date or time will be imprinted on your pictures unless you select “off”. According to the instructions, the date/time module is smart enough to know when it’s a leap year.
There’s a neat sticker inside reminding you to use either Sakura or Konica film. I installed a new CR2025 battery (far right) for the date/time feature. The camera uses a single AA battery that powers the flash and the underexposure warning light (just to the right of the viewfinder).

We consider the Konica Tomato a “Modern Classic” and part of our “Plastic Fantastic” collection. If you’re interested in purchasing this set, it’s available in our online camera shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com which is hosted by Etsy. Thanks for stopping by! Chris

Follow me on Instagram at @ccphotographyai

Comments are always welcomed as I’ve learned quite a bit from reader feedback. As always, thanks for stopping by, and while you’re at it, feel free to visit my camera shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com (CC Design Studios hosted by Etsy). – Chris Whelan

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, is this blog’s property and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris, Chasing Classic Cameras with Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2022 Chasing Classic Cameras with Chris (Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic), Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

A pair of cameras from Nicca

Nicca 3-F (1957) and a Nicca 3-S (1955) in this studio image from 2017.

If you’re looking to get into 35mm photography and you don’t want to go the Leica route then a well-made camera from Nicca is the way to go. Often gems like these can be found at a fraction of the price of a Leica from the same period and in my opinion, a Nicca is as good or better than the camera that inspired them. Thanks for stopping by! – Chris

Follow me on Instagram at @ccphotographyai

Comments are always welcomed as I’ve learned quite a bit from reader feedback. As always, thanks for stopping by, and while you’re at it, feel free to visit my camera shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com (CC Design Studios hosted by Etsy). – Chris Whelan

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, is this blog’s property and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris, Chasing Classic Cameras with Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2022 Chasing Classic Cameras with Chris (Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic), Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

Buy Me A Coffee

Happy SUNday! – me and my Nicca 3-S

I recently rediscovered these images that I had taken with my Nicca 3-S 35mm rangefinder camera a few years back. I say rediscovered because I don’t believe I’ve posted all of the pictures before. They were hiding on a DVD in plain sight.

First, the camera and lens.

Nicca 3-S from 1955.
Super sharp Nippon Kogaku Nikkor-HC f2 5cm lens.

The images are unretouched, just as they were scanned by the photo lab.

Historic District, Fernandina Beach, Amelia Island, Florida.

I’m quite pleased with the results. All images were taken on Fujicolor Superia X-TRA 800.

Thanks for stopping by and have a beautiful day! – Chris

Comments are always welcomed as I’ve learned quite a bit from reader feedback. As always, thanks for stopping by, and while you’re at it, feel free to visit my camera shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com (CC Design Studios hosted by Etsy). – Chris Whelan

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, is this blog’s property and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris, Chasing Classic Cameras with Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2022 Chasing Classic Cameras with Chris (Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic), Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

Buy Me A Coffee

Rare Pentamatic II Brochure from Japan

I’m always, and I mean always, chasing anything to do with Yashica’s Pentamatic series of 35mm SLR cameras from the early 1960s. I was taken by its simple modern lines the first time I laid eyes on one.

Here is a wonderful Pentamatic II sales brochure (almost a catalog) from Japan that I’m guessing was published around the Summer of 1960 which was when the camera was introduced in Japan. I believe this is the first (and only) full-length brochure for this model.

The front cover introduces us to the Yashica Pentamatic II.

The lens was a new addition to this camera and was likely made for Yashica by Zunow Optical.

The back cover summarizes the features and specs of Yashica’s newest camera and lens set. The address (bottom) is listed as Yashica Co., Ltd., Nihonbashi Muromachi, Tokyo 1-8.

The ‘Yashica Girl’ started appearing on sales brochures around 1958 or so and continued here in this brochure. I don’t know her origins or purpose but she has two co-workers that often appear with her on other brochures. Here is a peek inside (it reads right to left) –

Unfortunately for Yashica, the Pentamatic II was not well received so it had a shortened production run of just over 5,300 units from August 1960 to January 1961 with breaks in production during that time. January 1961 is when Zunow Optical went bankrupt or was absorbed by Yashica (not well documented). Either way that put an end to this unique lens on a Yashica camera. It’s likely though that the lens design transferred over to Tomioka Optical (which was owned by Yashica) and Tomioka may have made this same lens for Mamiya in 1962.

One of my original Pentamatic II cameras with the Auto Yashinon f1.7 5.8cm lens.
One of the hardest cameras to chase down in Yashica’s entire lineup with just over 5,300 made with a vast majority only available in the Japanese domestic market.

Thanks for stopping by! – Chris

Follow me on Instagram @ccphotographyai

Comments are always welcomed as I’ve learned quite a bit from reader feedback. As always, thanks for stopping by, and while you’re at it, feel free to visit my camera shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com (CC Design Studios hosted by Etsy). – Chris Whelan

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, is this blog’s property and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris, Chasing Classic Cameras with Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2022 Chasing Classic Cameras with Chris (Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic), Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

Buy Me A Coffee

Leica Leicavit Rapid Winder

I’ve placed my Leica leicavit rapid winder for sale in my camera shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com. The Leicavit will work on the Leica IIIf and IIIg 35mm rangefinder cameras from the 1950s with a serial number higher than 400,000. This winder has been fully serviced and adjusted by Mr. Yoxin Ye who is a well-known Leica repairperson.

Designed for “Sequence Photography” per Leica’s instruction booklet. This one will work with the IIIf and IIIg.

Here is the Leicavit pictured on my 1956 Leica IIIg.

As pictured, it comes with the original box and tissue paper. Not very many of these are available that have been fully serviced. It was tested on my Leica IIIg and 100% is working. Thanks for stopping by and if you’re interested in purchasing it please visit my camera shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com which is hosted by Etsy. You can also follow me on Instagram at @ccphotographyai. Thanks for stopping by! – Chris

Comments are always welcomed as I’ve learned quite a bit from reader feedback. As always, thanks for stopping by, and while you’re at it, feel free to visit my camera shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com (CC Design Studios hosted by Etsy). – Chris Whelan

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, is this blog’s property and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris, Chasing Classic Cameras with Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2022 Chasing Classic Cameras with Chris (Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic), Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

Buy Me A Coffee