(almost) wordless wednesday

yashica pentamatic big time

Have a beautiful and safe day and many thanks for stopping by! – Chris

I have some interesting new items in my camera shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com which is hosted by Etsy.

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2020 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

Minolta SR-T 202 new in the shop today!

Happy Monday all! I’ve added this wonderful one-owner Minolta SR-T 202 35mm film camera set in my camera shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com

DSCF0141

DSCF0144

Gorgeous Minolta from around 1975.

DSCF0159

The original boxes (with styrofoam inserts) have matching serial numbers with the lens and camera. One-owner since new!

DSCF0150

Perfect film camera for the beginner or seasoned pro. Fully manual camera with built-in exposure meter. The best way to improve your photography skills.

DSCF0158

It’s a beauty!

Please stop by my Etsy hosted camera shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com for more details. – Thanks, Chris

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2020 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

Minolta SR-T 201 35mm SLR

One of the workhorses of the mid to late 1970s – the Minolta SR-T 201 is built like a tank (and weighs just slightly less) and its design shouts basic but functional. A perfect camera for a beginning film photographer.

DSCF8272

Natural light from a north-facing window softened the look of the vintage chrome.

The Minolta SRT 201 was in production between 1975 and 1981 which is a pretty long run for such a basic camera. The competition at that time was fierce between Canon, Nikon, Olympus, and even Yashica for solid SLRs that wouldn’t break the bank. Minolta had a good reputation for delivering value and its Rokkor lenses (this one takes the MD mount) in a wide range of focal lengths. maximum apertures, and budgets. Excellent quality used Rokkor lenses that would fit this camera are plentiful in online auction sites.

DSCF8263

It comes in a black and white version too!

DSCF8253

DSCF8255

A simple top plate with easy to adjust controls.

So why is this Minolta perfect for a first-time film shooter? It’s pretty much as manual as you can get – the button type battery powers the built-in TTL (thru-the-lens) exposure meter but the shutter is completely mechanical with speeds from ‘B’ (bulb) to 1/1000th of a second. If you choose to meter with a phone app or hand-held exposure meter then you don’t even need the battery. The viewfinder is bright and it displays the selected shutter speed across the bottom and a match needle indicator along the right side.

DSCF8259 (2)

Thanks for stopping by and be sure to pop on over to my camera shop to see what I’ve got in stock. Visit http://www.ccstudio2380.com – Chris

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2020 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

Saturday Snaps – Canon F-1

Canon was the official 35mm camera of the 1984 Olympics held in Los Angeles.

Canon New F-1 Olympics

Canon New F-1. A complete redesign of the original F-1 from 1971.

Canon F-1 1984 Oly

Beautiful camera.

DSCF9158

A well used Canon F-1 on the left (just the right amount of brassing). The camera on the left has the eye-level finder and the one on the right has the AE finder.

And here’s another limited edition F-1 from 1978. Only about 2000 were made in this distinctive olive drab color with this super cool box, special strap and matching OD camera case. Also known as the Canon ODF-1. It appears that this version of the F-1 was only available for sale in Japan.

Canon F-1 OD Set with Box Strap Case

Image kindly borrowed from the web.

Have a wonderful day and thanks for stopping by! – Chris

http://www.ccstudio2380.com

 

Yashica Super Yashinon-R f/3.5 13.5cm Lens – Likely made for Yashica by Kyoei Optical

It’s come to my attention recently through correspondence with a reader of this blog that my Yashica lens may have been made for Yashica by a small lens maker, Kyoei Optical Company, Ltd.

I had assumed that most of Yashica’s early lenses were made by Tomioka Optical of Tokyo with only a few exceptions. Zunow made some cine lenses for Yashica in the late 1950s and it looks as though Zunow may have made the odd 5.8cm f/1.7 lens that was used on the Yashica Pentamatic II (August 1960 to January 1961) and the lens on the earliest Yashica Lynx 1000.

Pictured below is the subject of this post – my Yashica Super Yashinon-R f/3.5 13.5cm short telephoto lens with a Pentamatic bayonet mount. The lens is further marked with a “K.C. in red on the front lens ring. It’s a compact but heavy pre-set lens with click stops at f/3.5 to f/22.

yashica 13.5 lens with logo

My Yashica branded lens from 1960

Below is a similar-looking lens that I found while surfing on Flickr.

flickr kyoei 135mm

This image is used with kind permission by Mr. René Maly. You can visit his Flickr site by clicking here.

His lens is marked Kyoei Optical Acall f/3.5 135mm and is pictured with an Exakta mount while mine is for the Pentamatic bayonet mount (unique to the Yashica Pentamatic). The Yashica lens weighs 390 grams (13.7 oz.) without the lens caps and the Acall lens weighs 360 grams.

Pictured below is the complete set as I received it some years ago. The metal Yashica branded lens cap is 52mm and is felt-lined and fits the lens perfectly. The hood is unmarked and it simply screws into the filter threads on the front of the lens. I also have an unbranded Pentamatic mount plastic rear lens cap which is the only one in my collection. The Pentamatic family of 35mm SLRs were only sold with standard lenses attached. I’ve never seen just a body for sale in its original Yashica factory packaging.

yashica 135mm logo

The lens has 12 aperture blades which appear to be common to the Kyoei Acall lens in this focal length.

yashica 13.5 les kc logo

The serial number is NO. 1350927 which indicates that it’s a 135mm lens and it was number 927 made since the start of production. It’s unknown when the lens first went into production but some of the very first may have been made as early as December 1959 but more likely January and February 1960.

What’s interesting is that this lens has a red “K.C.” engraved on the lens ring while the Kyoei Acall lens does not. A big guess on my part, and at this point, it’s only a guess, is that it refers to the hard coating used on the glass surfaces. Typically the letter “C” is used to identify that a lens is coated (Canon uses “S.S.C.” for “Super Spectra Coated” as an example). The “K” in “K.C.” may identify that the coating is from Kyoei.

Here’s another image of the Kyoei Acall lens.

Kyoei Optical Acall 135

Kyoei Optical Acall 135mm f/3.5 lens. Image courtesy of René Maly.

So there you have it. Based solely on observation on my part between the two lenses I’ve made the connection to Kyoei Optical. I haven’t seen written information or anything in a Yashica sales brochure that links the two companies together. If you have additional info about Kyoei Super-Acall lenses made for Yashica please share it with me. Kyoei Optical also appears to have made SLR lenses for Petri and they made a bunch of lenses using their own name for use on L39 (LTM) rangefinder bodies.

yashica 13.5 lenslogo

IMG_20200212_0001

Yashica sales brochure from around September 1960 – shortly after the Pentamatic II was released in Japan. My lens is the third from the left. The other two lenses to the left are also likely made for Yashica by Kyoei Optical.

Thanks for stopping by! – Chris

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2020 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

Fujica ST 701 35mm SLR Set – 1971

We’ve recently added this beautiful camera set to our online camera shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com. 

We love to collect classic film cameras that are still in their “factory fresh” condition and this totally unused Fujica was a joy to display in our collection.

DSCF7340

DSCF7334 (2)

A test image made with the Fujinon 55mm f/1.8 lens mounted on my Fujifilm X-A10 mirrorless digital camera body via a Fotodiox M42-NX adapter.

I love the look these vintage lenses produce – they’re far from razor-sharp but soft is nice too in this digital age.

DSCF7346

The silky-smooth surfaces on this Fujica are stunning.

DSCF7351

Fuji Photo Film Company built a wonderful camera when they released the ST 701. I love its clean lines and uncluttered design.

DSCF7353

This Fujica uses M42 screw mount lenses from a wide range of manufacturers such as Tomioka, Yashica, Asahi Pentax, and others. If you’re interested, pop on over to http://www.ccstudio2380.com for the complete details and additional pictures.

Thanks for stopping by! – Chris

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2019 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

 

 

Macro Monday – Monster Glass

20191111_112351

One of the finest fast lenses ever – well pretty close anyway. Made by Tomioka Optical for Yashica (and others) this ultra-fast 55mm f/1.2 lens is a perfect match for the Yashica TL Electro X ITS that it’s mounted on.

Thanks for stopping by! – Chris

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2019 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

Happy SUNday! – Cameras

Random cameras from the collection.

DSC02250 (2)

Asahi Pentax H2 – 1959

DSC02263

Polaroid 350 – 1969 to 1971

DSC02271

Kodak Brownie Hawkeye Flash – 1950 to 1961 – uses 620 roll film.

DSC01524

Yashica-Kyocera Dental Eye III – 1997 to 2006 – 35mm film

All of these were in our collection in 2010 and 2011 and have since been sold to other collectors. Back then I favored using a blue background in my studio. My studio camera was a Sony Cyber-shot DSC-W170.

Thanks for stopping by and have a wonderful day! – Chris

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2019 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

Yashica’s TL Series of 35mm SLRs

Yashica’s evolution during the 1960s and beyond started with their first TTL (Thru-the-Lens) exposure metered cameras – the much loved TL Series which were introduced right after the successful J Series (Penta J, Reflex 35, J-3, J-5, J-P, J-4, J-7).

It began with the exceptional TL-Super in April 1966. The chronology is as follows based on serial numbers and not based on advertised or previously known release dates.

  • TL-Super          Apr 1966
  • TL                      Nov 1967
  • TL Electro-X    Oct 1968   Type 1
  • TL-E                  Jun 1969
  • TL Electro X    Jul 1969     Type 2
  • ITS                    Dec 1970
  • Electro AX       Mar 1972
  • TL-Electro       Apr 1972
  • FFT                   Jul 1973

The TL Series ended in 1978 with the last TL-Electro made. All of these Yashicas used the M42 screw-in lenses which were made by a variety of lens makers.

It’s easy to decode your camera’s serial number as Yashica used a 3 or 4 digit date code at the beginning of the serial number. As an example, here’s a serial number on a TL-E (90607952)  9 = 1969, 06 = Jun, 07952 = 7,952nd made that month in sequence from 00001.

Here’s a TL (2816946)  2 = Feb, 8 = 1968, 16946 = 16,946th made that month in sequence.

If you’ve got a serial number that you can’t quite decode send it to me at ccphotographyai@gmail.com

Thanks, Chris

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2019 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

Undiscovered Yashica!

Well, “undiscovered” might be a bit of a stretch but at least unrecognized and undocumented as best as I can tell.

The very well known Yashica TL Electro-X but with a twist – no gothic “Y” on the pentaprism. No big deal really but it brings up some interesting questions. My good friend Paul Sokk (www.yashicatlr.com) and I have for years spent some of our free time exploring Yashica’s serial numbering system in hopes of decoding the numbers into some type of a recognizable date (if there was one to be decoded). Along the way, this version of the TL Electro-X would occasionally pop up.

Here’s the camera that’s now a part of my collection.

Yashica Type 1 Logo

The very familiar Yashica TL Electro-X except it’s just a bit unfamiliar and slightly different.

Yashica Type 1 Back Logo

Rear view of the Yashica TL Electro-X Type 1.

The serial number on this Yashica is 81200636. Here’s how it decodes: 8 = 1968, 12 = Dec, and 00636 is the sequence number for that month (December) assumed to start at 00001. Pretty simple once you’ve looked at hundreds of serial numbers.

This camera it turns out is from the first batch produced during a three month period of production (Oct-Dec 1968). I’ll refer to this as the TL Electro-X Type 1. When Yashica started making this camera again in July 1969, it saw a few changes – most noticeably the “X” was made larger and was now red, they dropped the hyphen between Electro and X and the pentaprism got its familiar gothic “Y”. I’ll call this second coming of the camera the TL Electro X Type 2 (pictured below).

DSCF6151

TL Electro X Type 2

The camera did receive one operational change as the “FP” flash socket was added on the T2 which was not available on the T1. The other changes are mostly cosmetic and I would guess these subtle tweaks were driven by the marketing department although there could have been problems with obtaining parts or production issues.

So if these changes didn’t affect the operation of the camera then why were they done? I don’t know yet and I may never know but up to this point in time this version of the camera went unreported even though it appeared in almost two years of advertising by Yashica! It was hidden in plain sight.

Contributor Jens Erik from Denmark sent me this ad from April 1973. It shows the T1 (lower right corner) and T2 together in the same ad along with the newly released Electro AX.

yashica1973-4x1+x2

Is it just a version of the original or is it truly a different type? Because there were visual and production changes made I’m calling it a different type – TL Electro-X T1.

I’ll be sharing a few more studio shots of this new Yashica soon so be sure to check back. Oh by the way, since Yashica only produced the Type 1 for a short time they’re a little hard to find on auction sites, actually quite rare when you start looking for one. Compared to the Type 2 which was in production from at least July 1969 to the end of the run in 1975, you’re looking for a camera with less than 5,000 made against hundreds of thousands made.

Check your collection… maybe this rare Yashica is hiding in plain sight!

Chris