Chasing Classic Cameras – Yashica TL Electro X 1973 Hong Kong Model

We enjoy collecting and sharing our Yashica cameras with our readers, especially if they tend to be a little hard to find and in such outstanding condition. I say this is hard to find just because not many were made at Yashica’s new factory in Hong Kong during 1973. As the saying goes, this was assembled in Hong Kong from parts made in Japan.

There’s really no difference between the models assembled in Hong Kong from the ones made in Japan that we’ve been able to detect. In our experience the fit and finish is the same with no known issues particular to the HK model. In fact, the HK models that we’ve owned seem to be in excellent condition overall with exceptionally nice satin chrome surfaces that hold up well over the years.

Typically ‘JAPAN’ would be on the top plate next to the serial number but on these models ‘HONG KONG’ is on the bottom.
The serial number is easy to decode. 3 = 1973, 10 = Oct, 01219 = the number built up to this point for that month.

The lens on this beauty is a fast and sharp Auto Yashinon DS-M 50mm f1.4 made for Yashica by the recently acquired Tomioka Optical. All Yashica camera bodies use M42 screw mount lenses up to the C/Y mount cameras made much later.

Thanks for stopping by and be sure to stop by my shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com – Chris

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2021 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

Chasing Classic Cameras – Canon EOS Rebel G

A very simple 35mm SLR camera with outstanding features that hold up well even today. The EOS Rebel G was released in late 1996 featuring the latest in Canon’s autofocus and auto exposure technologies. The Cano EOS cameras also used Canon’s well respected EF family of lenses which could be switched to manual focus in an instant. I’ve always found these cameras to provide excellent results without the crazy weight of a more traditional SLR. I also have the Canon EOS Rebel 2000 that immediately followed the Rebel G in late 1999.

I believe that the Canon EOS Rebel G and EOS Rebel 2000 are underrated cameras in today’s marketplace. If you can find one-owner, gently used cameras and matching lenses they make great 35mm film cameras that are perfect for the beginner and the seasoned film photographer.

Here’s an interesting link from Canon – https://global.canon/en/c-museum/product/film190.html

Thanks for stopping by and be sure to stop by my shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com – Chris

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2021 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

Canon’s Technological Wonder EOS-1N RS

Back in late 1994 Canon released the newest member of their EOS 35mm SLR film camera family, the EOS-1N. This hyper-talented camera series would be the last 35mm film cameras made by Canon on the dawn of the digital age.

The motor drive in the RS was non-removable and was capable of up to 10fps in the high-speed continuous mode!!
Scan from the Canon EOS-1N sales brochure for the RS – 1994
Scan of the instruction manual – Japanese Edition 1995
Pictured with its standard lens – Canon EF 50mm f1.4 USM
Fast lens, fast camera.

Do I need the high-speed function of a 35mm SLR film camera that goes through film like it’s a movie camera? Heck no, but it’s a blast owning it (kinda like a Corvette). You don’t need it but it’s fun to drive.

As the weather turns more favorable for out and about shooting I hope to take this marvel for a spin around town (pandemic appropriate of course).

Thanks for stopping by! – Chris

Be sure to stop by my camera shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2020 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

High-Speed Film Eaters from Canon

The original Canon F-1 35mm SLR film camera was capable of up to 3.5 frames per second (fps) when mated with the Canon Motor Drive MF (shown below left). My F-1 is from 1978 and at that time I didn’t purchase the motor drive. The drive was added within the last 5 or so years. The Canon EOS-1N RS (lower right) is the latest addition to my Canon collection and although I haven’t run a roll of film through it yet I have no reason to doubt that it’s fully operational.

The motor drive on the F-1 is removable thereby saving the extra weight of carrying it around when its not needed. The motor drive on the EOS-1N RS is built-in so there’s no option to save a bit of weight. The EOS weighs in at 1,476 grams which is 3 lbs 4 oz with batteries installed (8 AA) but without film and without a lens.
The Canon EOS-1N RS in all its glory. With its fixed, semi-transparent pellicle mirror the RS is capable of shooting film at up to 10 fps! A fun way to eat through a roll of 36 exposures in under 4 seconds!

Since the pellicle mirror doesn’t move when shooting the 10 fps with quick and accurate autofocus and auto exposure can be achieved. I can’t imagine ever holding the shutter button down to eat up 10 exposures in a second but who knows, it’s nice to think that I’ll someday use it if needed.

The two cameras are about the same width and height but they differ greatly in bulk.

I’m still up in the air as to which EF AF lens I want to get. I do know that as I’ve aged my ability to hold a steady shot has diminished so the lens will have to have image stabilization.

Canon’s EF 24–105mm f/3.5–5.6 IS STM lens is at the top of my wishlist as it falls within what most people would call the normal range for 35mm photography.

$599.99 new. I’ll have to save up a bit to get this one.

Thanks for stopping by. I would recommend looking at the Canon EOS-1N RS or Canon EOS-1V which is a bit newer ( I think 2000). I would say that these cameras represent the best (most sophisticated) film cameras that Canon made just before going digital. The good news is that the EOS-1N RS is not all that expensive via online auction sites, in fact it’s quite a bit less expensive than the EOS-1V which in some cases goes for double the cost of the RS. Have a great day and if you own this camera please drop me a comment about what your impression with the camera has been. – Chris

Be sure to stop by my camera shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2020 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

No Love Fuji? The Discovery 90 Date

This wonderful Fuji deserves another look.

Chasing Classic Cameras with Chris

The plastic fantastic wonders of the 1980s and 1990s generally receive no love – especially looking back on them with our digitized eyeballs in 2017. These overlooked (even when new for the most part) cameras were the bridge cameras for many photographers that were moving away from their bulky SLRs from the 1970s and looking for something easy, carefree and light to take with them on short outings and family get togethers. The 35mm format was the clear winner in the format wars, now manufacturers wanted think-free 35s that were as easy to use as falling outta bed (?).

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This Fuji Discovery 90 Date was introduced in May 1993 to an already crowded plastic 35mm marketplace. So how to stand out? Drop-in loading, auto focus, auto exposure auto rewind and auto wind was a good start. A big bright viewfinder centered over the lens – and macro capability (23 1/2…

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Burke & James 4×5 Press Camera Kit – 1952

Hi all! Thanks for stopping by. I wanted to share this wonderful camera kit that I’ve recently acquired from the original owner’s family. I’ve done some minor restoration on the rare original leather and wood case and I’ve gone through the camera and cleaned and inspected (tested) everything.

The complete kit with sheet film holders (5), rare lens shade, instruction booklet, flash bulbs, and the camera.
The case is made from wood that’s been covered with leather. Some of the edges showed some wear so I did some minor restoration. The aluminum lens shade is made by Tiffen and uses a Kodak adapter. An original unused lens board is also included.

The camera was originally owned by noted New Mexico writer and photographer Ken Cobean. Ken’s work has appeared in magazines such as Life, Time, and National Geographic and Ken received two prestigious awards from Kodak at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair.

This beautiful set is now available in my camera shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com – pop on over and check it out. There’s even a short video that you can watch.

Thanks for stopping by and have a great day! – Chris

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2020 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

Throwback Thursday – a Canon Classic

Canon New F-1 Olympics

The Canon New F-1 Los Angeles 1984 Olympics Edition.

Thanks for stopping by and have a beautiful day! – Chris

Be sure to stop by my always open camera shop hosted by Etsy at http://www.ccstudio2380.com

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2020 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

SUNday Spotlight – Chasing Classic Cameras – Kodak

Happy Sunday to all! Today’s spotlight falls on these two beautiful classics from Kodak. Both are from the early 1900s and they are fully operational.

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Kodak No. 3-A Folding Brownie Camera Model A. This one is from the period 1909-1913.

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The lens is made by Bausch & Lomb Optical Company and the shutter is adjustable for “T’, “B”, and “I”. This model uses 124 roll films.

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Pictured below is No. 3 Folding Pocket Kodak Model H.

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No. 3 Folding Pocket Kodak Model H from around 1910.

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Bausch & Lomb Optical Company lens with aperture adjustments from f4 to f128 and shutter speeds of “T”, “B”, 1/25, 1/50, and 1/100 second.

The Kodak pictured above uses 118 roll films that are no longer made but both of these cameras can use modern 120 roll films with the use of adapters on the film spools.

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The black bellows are original to this camera. Previous models had red bellows.

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These cameras are from the collection of well-known New Mexico photographer and writer, Ken Cobean (Hial Kenyon Cobean, Jr.). His photographs and articles appeared in numerous publications including Life, Time, and other well-known magazines.

I attribute the excellent condition of these cameras to excellent care and a favorable environment of the Southwest United States.

Thanks for stopping by and be sure to visit my camera shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com – Chris

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2020 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

Leica IIIg – 1956

Hello all! Happy Saturday.

Today’s spotlight camera is the Leica IIIg which was the last Leica rangefinder camera that used L39 (LTM) screw-in lenses. This lovely camera set is from 1956.

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The camera’s serial number indicates that it was in production in the latter half of 1956 while the lens looks to be from 1955. The Leicavit winder is appropriate for the models IIIf and IIIg so I believe it’s original to this camera.

Typical to cameras that are over 60-years-old, this one will need a complete CLA (cleaning internally, lubricating, and adjustment) professionally. The shutter is way out of adjustment so the shutter curtains are not operating properly and the speeds are off. The winder will need internal cleaning (mostly removing old lubricants) and installing fresh lubricant. Hopefully, that will enable it to operate as designed at about two frames per second (a stretch).

The lens works as it should and appears to have escaped the dreaded fungus and mold. The front and rear optics are clean and scratch-free but internally it does suffer from haze on all the elements. This appears to be typical with Leitz lenses from this era.

This camera set has a wonderful history and it would be nice to be able to shoot with it again. Here’s hoping.

Thanks for stopping by and have a beautiful day! Please feel free to visit my camera shop hosted by Etsy at http://www.ccstudio2380.com – Chris

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2020 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

Heavyweights 1954-1955

Another look at these very fine cameras.

Chasing Classic Cameras with Chris

DSCF8482 logoOn the left is the Fujicaflex Automat by the Fuji Photo Film Company – Fuji’s first and only twin-lens reflex (TLR) camera. On the right is the Yashica Flex S (aka Yashicaflex S) by Yashima Kogaku Seiki Company.

Yashima (later to be known as Yashica) went on to build TLRs until 1986 producing thousands encompassing over thirty models.

The Fujicaflex was under development by Fuji since around 1948 and the direction they took was to build a high-quality camera geared to the serious amateur and semi-professional photographer. By all accounts, it was a bust in the marketplace (way too expensive) as Fuji never attempted to follow it up with a second model and ending production in just about a year.

The Fujicaflex is noticeably larger than the Yashica Flex S – the Fuji weighs 1,323 grams and the Yashica comes in at 1,117 grams. Both cameras were weighed with a…

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