School outing to Kamakura, Japan – 1977

Late Spring 1977. I believe these steps led up to The Great Buddha (Kamakura Daibutsu). I do not know which school the students were from.

Camera & Film – Yashica TL Electro X Kodak Ektachrome 64

This is not my actual first camera but it’s the first 35mm SLR model that I owned and purchased new in early 1972.
I’ve shot quite a few rolls of this back in the 1970s. Kodachrome was a great color slide film but its ASA was only 25 so if you wanted a bit more speed you needed Ektachrome 64 and later High-Speed Ektachrome 200.

Thanks for stopping by! – Chris

Comments are always welcomed as I’ve learned quite a bit from reader feedback. As always, thanks for stopping by, and while you’re at it, feel free to visit my camera shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com (CC Design Studios hosted by Etsy). – Chris Whelan

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, is this blog’s property and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris, Chasing Classic Cameras with Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2022 Chasing Classic Cameras with Chris (Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic), Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

Buy Me A Coffee

Yokosuka to Yokohama – take the red train!

Hey, they’re all red! What gives!?

That’s what we were told to do. Go to the Yokosuka train station on the Keihin Kyuko line and take the red train to Yokohama, it’s the fastest way to get there. The only problem, all the trains were red in the late 1970s. But what they meant was to look for the trains with the red kanji in the upper corner of the sign board. There were black kanji trains, green, blue, and red. The black trains were locals so that meant over an hour or more to get to Yokohama and a stop at every station along the way. The greens were the best since they only stopped twice before getting into Yoko. I don’t recall what the blue trains did or where they went.

The train timetable sign at Yokosuka Central Station.

The colors indicated when that train would leave the station. The greens were the best followed by the reds. When I was stationed in Yokosuka on the USS Midway we always wanted to get off in time to catch the 1455 or the 1515 green train to Yokohama (where we lived). There were plenty of times I’ve sprinted from the base main gate through Yokosuka to catch a green train as it would cut about 30 minutes off the commute home. Thanks for stopping by! – Chris

Comments are always welcomed as I’ve learned quite a bit from reader feedback. As always, thanks for stopping by, and while you’re at it, feel free to visit my camera shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com (CC Design Studios hosted by Etsy). – Chris Whelan

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, is this blog’s property and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris, Chasing Classic Cameras with Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2022 Chasing Classic Cameras with Chris (Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic), Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

Buy Me A Coffee

Happy SUNday!

Souvenir book from the 1964 Summer Olympics that were held in Tokyo.

It was a wonderful time for the people of Japan to show the world how far they had come since the end of the War.

Olympic grounds and village.

The site used by the Olympics was once used by the JIA during WWII as a training ground. Later, the U.S. Government took control of the area. Here’s an excerpt from an article written at the time of the Olympics…

TOKYO, Sept. 15 — If the members of the United States squad at the Olympic Games think that the Olympic Village, formally opened today, was designed especially to make Americans feel at home, they will be right. It was.

The conversion of the former Washington Heights United States military housing area has not substantially altered the intentional resemblance of the 165‐acre site to an American suburb. Wide green lawns bordered by evergreens, cement sidewalks and the buildings themselves reproduced an American town so faithfully that the Americans who lived there needed to foot no contact with an alien land outside the guarded gates. The presence of Japanese servants supplied the only local touch.

The athletes from other countries, who have never been to the United States, will find in Tokyo’s Olympic Village a complete sampling of American suburban living. The principal difference is that the new refrigerators, washing machines, television sets and other household equipment being installed in the tidy cottages bear Japanese instead of American trademarks—but the design is essentially American, part of the debt owed to United States industry by Japan’s booming economy.

The 249 cottages built for American servicemen and their families and the 14 block‐like buildings that once were bachelor officers’ quarters and residences for single women employed by the United States forces will house more than 8,000 athletes and officials from 98 nations.

There’s even an interesting video on YouTube that shows a bit of the history of the area. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ov4wOvCdQCM

The book was originally purchased at the large Mitsukoshi department store in Tokyo.

Occasionally these books will pop up on various online auction sites like eBay and Yahoo Japan Auction. Thanks for stopping by! – Chris

Comments are always welcomed as I’ve learned quite a bit from reader feedback. As always, thanks for stopping by, and while you’re at it, feel free to visit my camera shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com (CC Design Studios hosted by Etsy). – Chris Whelan

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, is this blog’s property and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris, Chasing Classic Cameras with Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2022 Chasing Classic Cameras with Chris (Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic), Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

Buy Me A Coffee

Rare Yashica Minister-700 Camera Leaflet

I purchased this gorgeous advertising leaflet from a collector in Japan that is as fresh as the day it was printed back in 1964 (best guess of the actual date).

Yashica Minister-700 35mm rangefinder film camera.

The lower portion of this leaflet talks about a test that Asahi Camera magazine published in December 1964 praising the sharpness and speed of the f1.7 Yashinon 4.5cm lens and the accuracy of the built-in CdS light meter.

Yashica Minister-700 “DeLuxe” model 35mm rangefinder camera. There’s no mention as to what makes this a DeLuxe model other than the cost of a premium leather case for an additional 1,800 JPY.

The Yashinon f1.7 4.5cm lens has 6 elements in 4 groups. A lens like this would not normally be on a “simple” rangefinder like this at this price point of 18,000 JPY in 1964.

This model is not as common as the other models in the Minister “family” and it would be an excellent find for any collection. Thanks for stopping by! – Chris

Comments are always welcomed as I’ve learned quite a bit from reader feedback. As always, thanks for stopping by and, while you’re at it, feel free to visit my camera shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com (CC Design Studios hosted by Etsy). – Chris Whelan

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, is this blog’s property and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris, Chasing Classic Cameras with Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2022 Chasing Classic Cameras with Chris (Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic), Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

Buy Me A Coffee

Yashica 8E Zoom 8mm Movie Camera

Yashica 8E Zoom movie camera brochure from November 1960. I like to collect these early Yashica brochures, especially the ones that have a printed date code. Whenever I’m doing research on Yashica’s history having a brochure with a date is invaluable.

The Cover

Closed the brochure is about 195 x 135mm. Yep, that’s one of the ‘Yashica Gals’ drawn on the lower right. There are three different ones and as best as I can tell they were never named by Yashica. They made their appearance around this time across several brochures.

Inside Features

Yashica’s big cine camera with an impressive Yashinon Penta Reflex f1.8 11.5mm to 33mm zoom lens.

Back Cover Pages

The date code is on the extreme lower right – *N11T35* – The 11 is for November and the 35 is the Showa Era in this case Showa 35 (add 25 to the Showa Era = 1960).

Yashica started producing 8mm movie cameras as early as 1956 and was all in by the date of the brochure. Projectors, editors, interchangeable lenses most notably made by Zunow for Yashica, and accessories such as the title pictured above left. Many more brochures to discover from this period.

Comments are always welcomed as I’ve learned quite a bit from reader feedback. As always, thanks for stopping by and, while you’re at it, feel free to visit my camera shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com (CC Design Studios hosted by Etsy). – Chris Whelan

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, is this blog’s property and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris, Chasing Classic Cameras with Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2022 Chasing Classic Cameras with Chris (Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic), Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

Buy Me A Coffee

Carol’s new Canon AE-1, Japan 1978

Happy day!

When Carol and I lived in Yokohama, Japan back in the late 1970s we were happily acquiring our first bits of Canon gear. Here Carol gets her Canon AE-1 in pro-black complete with a power winder, ever-ready leather case, and 50mm f1.4 lens. She enjoyed using the camera with its case attached as the case covered the body with the winder attached. Fun times! Thanks for stopping by and have a beautiful day!

Comments are always welcomed as I’ve learned quite a bit from reader feedback. As always, thanks for stopping by and while you’re at it, feel free to visit my camera shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com (CC Design Studios hosted by Etsy). – Chris Whelan

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, is this blog’s property and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris, Chasing Classic Cameras with Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2021 Chasing Classic Cameras with Chris (Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic), Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

Buy Me A Coffee

Awesome Yashica collectible!

Hello and Happy Wednesday! I’ve just added a really hard-to-find Yashica collectible in my online camera shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com – pop on over and check it out.

It’s in very nice condition showing no signs of use. It’s from around 1966 or so when Yashica introduced the Electro 35 camera. A mat like this would be typically used by a camera dealer to place on a countertop to show and protect the camera he was showing to a customer. It’s about 16.25 by 10.50 inches. The raised gold letters look as bright and shiny as new.

Thanks for stopping by and have a great day!

Comments are always welcomed as I’ve learned quite a bit from reader feedback. As always, thanks for stopping by and while you’re at it, feel free to visit my camera shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com (CC Design Studios hosted by Etsy). – Chris Whelan

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris, Chasing Classic Cameras with Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2021 Chasing Classic Cameras with Chris (Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic), Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

Buy Me A Coffee

wordless wednesday

Comments are always welcomed as I’ve learned quite a bit from reader feedback. As always, thanks for stopping by and while you’re at it, feel free to visit my camera shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com (CC Design Studios hosted by Etsy). – Chris Whelan

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris, Chasing Classic Cameras with Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2021 Chasing Classic Cameras with Chris (Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic), Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

Buy Me A Coffee

My first post…

First Look!

CHRIS AND CAROL

The exciting first look (in print) of the Pentamatic…

First official appearance of the Pentamatic occurs in the May 1960 issue of Modern Photography magazine. In the June 1960 issues of Modern PhotographyU. S. Camera and Popular Photography, the first full-page ads appeared for the Pentamatic ’35’ reflex camera. The actual release date in the United States has almost always been considered by many to be March of 1960.

As of yet, I haven’t found evidence in print to support the March date. I do know that the Pentamatic was shown at the 36th annual ‘Master Photo DeaIers & Finishers Association’ trade show (MPDFA) held in St. Louis from March 21-25, 1960. I don’t know if the Pentamatic was released in Japan at an earlier date. From the progression of the serial numbers, by March 1960, about 1,500 cameras had been produced since production began in December 1959 at the Yashica Suwa factory. I doubt that there were enough cameras by March to support any widespread release in Japan or in Asia at that time. By June 1960, about 6,000 cameras had been built. There may have been enough to ship to the world markets starting in April and May. At their peak of production (summer 1960), it looks like Yashica was rolling out about 1,200 to 1,400 cameras each month.

Have a “Camera Holiday” in Japan. May 1960 magazine ad.

Part two of the “Camera Holiday” in Japan promotion. Very nice mention of Yashica’s factory in Suwa and the wonders of Japan!

Yashica provided this first ever look at their new Pentamatic SLR at the March 1960 MPDFA trade show in St. Louis.

First published look at the new Pentamatic from Yashica. May 1960

Comments are always welcomed as I’ve learned quite a bit from reader feedback. As always, thanks for stopping by and while you’re at it, feel free to visit my camera shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com (CC Design Studios hosted by Etsy). – Chris Whelan

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris, Chasing Classic Cameras with Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2021 Chasing Classic Cameras with Chris (Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic), Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

Buy Me A Coffee

Minolta Products Catalog – 1957

Wonderful cover artwork.
Newest models as of 1957.
Minolta A-2 that I briefly owned.

Comments are always welcomed as I’ve learned quite a bit from reader feedback. As always, thanks for stopping by and while you’re at it, feel free to visit my camera shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com (CC Design Studios hosted by Etsy). – Chris Whelan

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris, Chasing Classic Cameras with Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2021 Chasing Classic Cameras with Chris (Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic), Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

Buy Me A Coffee