Leica WINTU

OK, what’s a WINTU? A crazy little right angle viewfinder that Leica-Leitz made between 1933 to 1948. I imagine it could have assisted with close-up copy work but having used it on my Nicca 3-S I can say that it works but it seems to have been made as just another gadget to buy. It was advertised as being able to “look around corners” and to take pictures without being noticed (stealth street photography).

I would guess that mine is from just after the war.
A beautiful piece of gear.
The eyepiece swings down to be able to focus through the rangefinder.

It doesn’t fit completely onto the accessory shoe of my Nicca 3-S from around 1955 but the eyepiece does line up and I was able to use it. In reality the best way to take street pics without being detected is to place your camera on a table at a cafe along the street and prefocusing it and presetting the exposure. Then just press the shutter whenever something strikes your fancy.

Still, a nice bit of German engineering that’s stood the test of time.

Thanks for stopping by! – Chris

Be sure to stop by my camera shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2020 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

Leica Reloadable Film Cassette – IXMOO

Many 35mm rangefinder camera makers offered a reloadable metal film cassette for use with their cameras. Maybe one of the first to do so was Leitz for their Leica cameras.

Pictured below is one of those cassettes with its original Bakelite canister (film can). I believe this set was released around 1953 and was originally intended to be used with the new Leica M3.

Here’s a comparison between a standard disposable film cartridge from 1959 next to the metal reloadable cassette from Leitz (Code IXMOO). Overall the cartridges are within 1 mm of each other but as can be seen, the top of the Leitz canister is slightly taller.

The reloadable film cartridge is shown being used with the Leica IIIg which was the last Leica screw mount lens body made by Leica. My instruction book is from 1957.
The cartridges are about 50 mm tall to the top of the film spool.

The idea was simple. Since buying 35mm film in bulk was popular at the time, reloadable cassettes were a necessity to keep the cost of taking pictures low. As the disposable film cartridges became standardized the use of bulk film decreased as it was much simpler to use the premade film canisters.

While I was in college back in the early 1970s and taking some photography classes, I bulk loaded my own B&W films (mostly Kodak Plus X). It was a pain but it was far less expensive.

The earliest metal film cassettes made by Leitz were coded FILCA and were slightly taller than the newer IXMOO. I don’t have a FILCA cassette for comparison but I’d like to find one (I’ll gladly accept a donation of one if you have a spare).

From a Leica illustrated price list from 1939, the FILCA was Cat. No. 66,800 and was listed as a “Spare Roll Film Magazine” and sold for $3.00 USD. The catalog covers are pictured below.

Thanks for stopping by and if you’ve made it this far, congratulations for sticking with it! – Chris

Be sure to stop by my camera shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2020 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

I Like Leica (stuff)!

More Leica-Leitz stuff. This well-preserved brochure is from March 1949.

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The finder was useful from 35mm to 135mm – a must once you started using lenses above 50mm.

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The Leica catalog code is ‘VIOOH’ and the catalog number is 66,006a.

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The finder was quite expensive for 1949 at $77 plus tax. I believe this brochure is dated 3/49 if I interpret the code correctly.

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A somewhat similar viewfinder from Japan ca. 1952 from an unknown maker. This one is dedicated to using 13.5cm lenses.

Thanks so much for stopping by and be sure to visit my “gift shop” at http://www.ccstudio2380.com – Chris

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2020 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

SUNday Spotlight – Chasing Classic Cameras – Leica Bits!

Part of the fun of collecting cameras is discovering something you didn’t know existed. In this case, I recently discovered that Leica Leitz made lens cases out of Bakelite (ancient plastic) that held various Leica lenses in the late 1940s and early 1950s (reportedly as early as the mid-1930s).

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The case is designed to hold the lens securely with a small notch for the focus knob.

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There are small numbers embossed in the base, 2729, and on the cap 2617. These numbers do not show up currently on a search of Leica catalog numbers.

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The outside of the base of the Bakelite case.

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‘BCDOO’ was the Leica catalog code for the Bakelite lens case for the 3.5cm Summaron. The translation of the French is “Bakelite boxes with screw-thread cover for…”.

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Apparently, at some point in time (I don’t know the date of this catalog) these Bakelite cases were offered with the lenses as either a standard accessory or available as a separate option.

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A small sample of the Bakelite cases.

Thanks for stopping by and here’s hoping you have a beautiful day and that you’re about to discover something neat in your camera collection! – Chris

By the way, my camera shop is always open at http://www.ccstudio2380.com so feel free to pop on over.

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2020 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

 

Friday Fotos! – Naked Leica

Happy Friday all! Today’s featured camera the Leica IIIg with attached Leicavit winder. This camera was built in 1956 according to its serial number and typical for these Leica IIIg bodies, the leatherette (vulcanite) becomes brittle with age and extreme dryness. Although the dry air inhibits corrosion it does dry out internal lubrication so a complete CLA is in order.

I’ve deskinned (crude) the body of its failed covering reveling a rather industrial looking Leica in its place.

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I could get used to this look.

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Before the covering was removed. It looked good until you handled it and then bits of old leather just fell off in small crumbles.

It’s headed off for some much-needed service. I’ll keep you posted when I get it back and run a test roll of film through it. I’m still up in the air about what to recover it with.

Thanks for stopping by! – Chris

My camera shop is always open at http://www.ccstudio2380.com

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2020 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

Leica IIIg – 1956

Hello all! Happy Saturday.

Today’s spotlight camera is the Leica IIIg which was the last Leica rangefinder camera that used L39 (LTM) screw-in lenses. This lovely camera set is from 1956.

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The camera’s serial number indicates that it was in production in the latter half of 1956 while the lens looks to be from 1955. The Leicavit winder is appropriate for the models IIIf and IIIg so I believe it’s original to this camera.

Typical to cameras that are over 60-years-old, this one will need a complete CLA (cleaning internally, lubricating, and adjustment) professionally. The shutter is way out of adjustment so the shutter curtains are not operating properly and the speeds are off. The winder will need internal cleaning (mostly removing old lubricants) and installing fresh lubricant. Hopefully, that will enable it to operate as designed at about two frames per second (a stretch).

The lens works as it should and appears to have escaped the dreaded fungus and mold. The front and rear optics are clean and scratch-free but internally it does suffer from haze on all the elements. This appears to be typical with Leitz lenses from this era.

This camera set has a wonderful history and it would be nice to be able to shoot with it again. Here’s hoping.

Thanks for stopping by and have a beautiful day! Please feel free to visit my camera shop hosted by Etsy at http://www.ccstudio2380.com – Chris

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2020 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

New in the Shop – neat stuff!

Hello all… I hope your day and weekend are going well. Here are some new items I’ve added to my Etsy shop this week. My shop can be visited at http://www.ccstudio2380.com

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Everything is discounted at least 10% and many come with free USA shipping. I can mail almost anything worldwide and if there’s something that you’ve been looking for I just may have it. You can email me at ccphotographyai@gmail.com

Have a safe and happy day and thanks for stopping by! – Chris

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2020 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

Zeiss Ikon IIIa with Box – 1951

We were lucky enough to collect this wonderful Contax with an original box (we love old cameras and their boxes)!

The Contax IIIa (and IIa) are interchangable lens 35mm rangefinder cameras.

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The Contax IIIa was made by Zeiss Ikon AG. Stuttgart, West Germany.

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We haven’t run a roll of film through it yet but we hope to soon. The lens is a Carl Zeiss 50mm f/ 1.5 and the exposure meter (top) appears to be working after all these years.

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Exposure meter flap in the open position. The meter has selenium cells that are powered by light – no batteries necessary. The only downside is that over time they do give out and they can be a bit fragile after nearly 70-years-old.

The Carl Zeiss f/ 1.5 lens is considered to be fast even by today’s standards.

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Here’s the Contax IIa – same features but without the built-in exposure meter.

Here’s another camera in our collection that’s available to purchase. From 1955, the Minolta A2 (or A-2) 35mm non-interchangeable lens rangefinder camera.

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The Minolta is available in our Etsy camera shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com

Thanks for stopping by and have a wonderful day! – Chris

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2020 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.