late entry

As Saturday becomes Sunday I’ve decided to tease a post I’ll actually finish tomorrow (my Sunday). Nearly 100 years old and counting (the camera not the post).

Rather rare movie camera from 1925 gets a new home. For more please visit my online camera shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com

Thanks, Chris

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2020 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

Burke & James 4×5 Press Camera Kit – 1952

Hi all! Thanks for stopping by. I wanted to share this wonderful camera kit that I’ve recently acquired from the original owner’s family. I’ve done some minor restoration on the rare original leather and wood case and I’ve gone through the camera and cleaned and inspected (tested) everything.

The complete kit with sheet film holders (5), rare lens shade, instruction booklet, flash bulbs, and the camera.
The case is made from wood that’s been covered with leather. Some of the edges showed some wear so I did some minor restoration. The aluminum lens shade is made by Tiffen and uses a Kodak adapter. An original unused lens board is also included.

The camera was originally owned by noted New Mexico writer and photographer Ken Cobean. Ken’s work has appeared in magazines such as Life, Time, and National Geographic and Ken received two prestigious awards from Kodak at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair.

This beautiful set is now available in my camera shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com – pop on over and check it out. There’s even a short video that you can watch.

Thanks for stopping by and have a great day! – Chris

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2020 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

Large Format Lens – Wollensak Raptar

It sounds like a bird of prey – Wollensak Raptar. It’s actually a Raptar Serirs II 162mm f/4.5 (Catalog 2) lens that was made from 1947 to 1972. This one is from around 1950 and is in excellent condition with a fully working and accurate Wollensak Rapax 3 Synchromatic lens.

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This 162mm lens is equivalent to a 55mm ‘normal’ lens in 35mm photography.

Classic Burke & James Press (4×5) camera from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s (pictured below).

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Super clean and shiny.

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1946 catalog from Burke & James.

This press camera is designed to shoot with still available 4×5 inch sheet film in both color and black & white negative film and color transparency (slide) film.

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An example of a currently available 4×5 sheet film. Kodak, Fujifilm, Ilford, and others are still made and there are many online labs that develop the film.

Thanks for stopping by and have a great and safe day! – Chris

http://www.ccstudio2380.com

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2020 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

 

New ground glass focusing screen for my Burke & James 4×5 Press Camera

I’ve recently acquired a rather large collection of cameras and various bits of gear from well-known New Mexico writer and photographer Ken Cobean’s estate. His son, Sam Cobean was kind enough to let me appraise his dad’s collection and we’ve since struck a deal for me to purchase it.

One of the cameras in the collection is this very nice Burke & James Press camera (pictured below) from the late 1940s to early 1950s (I haven’t nailed down the exact date of this particular camera as of this post). It may turn out to be a mid-fifties camera and lens set after a tad more research.

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4×5 inch large format press camera. Equipped with a Wollensak Rapax Syncromatic shutter with speeds from 1 to 1/200th of a second plus ‘B’ and ‘T’.

The lens is a Wollensak 162mm f/4.5 coated Raptar Series II (Tessar type) made about 1950 or 1951. In 4×5 large format photography, a 162mm focal length lens is considered to be equivalent to a ‘normal’ 55mm lens in 35mm photography.

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The ‘C’ with the ‘W’ inside it (in red) indicates that the lens is ‘Wocoted’ or simply has a Wocote coating on all lens surfaces. This lens was produced between 1947 to 1972.

After installing a new custom made ground glass focusing screen I decided to give it a test run in the studio. My Yashica LM proved to be an appropriate subject.

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The revolving back on the B&J Press was rotated to take advantage of the verticle nature of the shot. I’m quite pleased with the results.

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My ‘studio’ set up. The press camera is in the dark on the lower right.

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The original ground glass in the press camera has seen better days.

Thanks for stopping by and have a great day! – Chris

http://www.ccstudio2380.com

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2020 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

 

SUNday Spotlight – Chasing Classic Cameras – Kodak

Happy Sunday to all! Today’s spotlight falls on these two beautiful classics from Kodak. Both are from the early 1900s and they are fully operational.

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Kodak No. 3-A Folding Brownie Camera Model A. This one is from the period 1909-1913.

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The lens is made by Bausch & Lomb Optical Company and the shutter is adjustable for “T’, “B”, and “I”. This model uses 124 roll films.

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Pictured below is No. 3 Folding Pocket Kodak Model H.

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No. 3 Folding Pocket Kodak Model H from around 1910.

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Bausch & Lomb Optical Company lens with aperture adjustments from f4 to f128 and shutter speeds of “T”, “B”, 1/25, 1/50, and 1/100 second.

The Kodak pictured above uses 118 roll films that are no longer made but both of these cameras can use modern 120 roll films with the use of adapters on the film spools.

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The black bellows are original to this camera. Previous models had red bellows.

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These cameras are from the collection of well-known New Mexico photographer and writer, Ken Cobean (Hial Kenyon Cobean, Jr.). His photographs and articles appeared in numerous publications including Life, Time, and other well-known magazines.

I attribute the excellent condition of these cameras to excellent care and a favorable environment of the Southwest United States.

Thanks for stopping by and be sure to visit my camera shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com – Chris

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2020 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

New in the Shop – neat stuff!

Hello all… I hope your day and weekend are going well. Here are some new items I’ve added to my Etsy shop this week. My shop can be visited at http://www.ccstudio2380.com

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Everything is discounted at least 10% and many come with free USA shipping. I can mail almost anything worldwide and if there’s something that you’ve been looking for I just may have it. You can email me at ccphotographyai@gmail.com

Have a safe and happy day and thanks for stopping by! – Chris

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2020 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

Vintage 35mm Film

It’s always fun to have some variety in your collection and collecting vintage film boxes (with the film still unopened inside) is a nice way to add some spice to your camera collection. These film boxes make a great addition to your displays.

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High Speed (SS) ASA 100 film from Konishiroku Photo.

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Expired March 1972

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Kodak’s versatile color print film of the 1970s.

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Expired January 1978

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One of my favorite films of the 1970s.

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Expired December 1977

The Kodak Kodachrome has been in one of my camera bags since new. Over the past decade or two, I’ve had it on display with my Canon F-1. I also have some Kodachrome 25 from the same time period. Awesome color slide film with super crisp resolution and colors.

Thanks for stopping by and be sure to visit my camera shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com. I have these three films available in my shop if you’re interested. – Chris

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2020 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

Kodak Brownie Holiday Flash Outfit – 1956

From Kodak around 1956, this is a Brownie Holiday Flash 127 roll film camera set. Still with its original box and still fully functional. The set comes with flashbulbs, the detachable flash unit, strap, and the Midget Flashguard (vinyl shield) for the flash.

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Made in the USA from rugged Bakelite and designed to last a lifetime.

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The flash takes (2) AA batteries and standard flashbulbs.

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The camera uses 127 roll film which is still being manufactured and of course, is still processed via online labs (and via home processing). 120 roll film can also be used if you modify the film roll to fit. 127 format produces 4 x 6.4 cm negatives (1 5/8 x 2 1/4 inch).

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The original box. I acquired this set from the original owner and his name “Bobby” is printed on the top center of the box (in red). He’s had it new since Christmas 1956.

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I’ve tested everything but the flash (I didn’t want to waste a bulb) and the winder, the shutter operate properly. The direct-view viewfinder is clear and bright – I do see some dust and a few fingers of fungus on the lens but I believe it’s still capable of delivering nice vintage images.

If you haven’t used a brownie before they’re a blast to use and the 127 format produces a nice image that’s easy to scan.

It’s available in my online camera shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com which is hosted by Etsy. I can ship it virtually worldwide and accept a variety of payments.

Thanks for stopping by and be sure to visit my shop as I’ve added many new items from my collection and have some exciting new finds to list shortly. – Chris

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2020 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

Two on Tuesday

Kodak Vigilant Junior Logo

Kodak Vigilant Junior Six-20 made during the 1940s. It took 6x9cm images on 620 film.

Thanks for stopping by and be sure to visit my camera shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com for some rather unique and very collectible cameras and photogear. – Chris

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2020 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

Happy SUNday! – US Trade Dollar

Here’s a coin that few have seen. A United States Trade dollar. It’s a large silver coin that was designed to be used in the Orient to facilitate trade with Eastern Asian markets. This example is free of “chop marks” that would often be struck by merchants onto the coins as they moved through the marketplace.

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Miss Liberty extending an olive branch as she gazes across the Pacific Ocean to the trade markets in Asia. Of course, the obverse of the coin features 13 stars representing the original thirteen colonies.

The coin is slightly larger than a Morgan silver dollar that most are familiar with. A close-up of the date shows the level of detail within the coin.

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For a while, the coin circulated within the United States as well as in East Asia. It has the distinction of being the first US coin that was demonetized while in circulation. The coinage act of 1965 remonetized the coin which makes it legal tender again but its worth is far more than a dollar.

Have a lovely day and thanks for stopping by! – Chris