Early (very early) Canon F-1 Brochure – 1970

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This is the earliest brochure that features the complete Canon F-1 system at that time. The back of the brochure has Bell & Howell as the distributor in the US and Canada.

The brochure is in near full mint new condition with the exception of a small dealer date stamp on the lower back cover. There is a very slight bend on the lower left of
the cover that is barely noticeable. The binding (staples) are tight and there is
no writing, no missing pages, and no folded or dog eared pages. It’s clean
and bright with no musty smells.

Perfect for your collection and a great way to enhance your Canon F-1.
The brochure is an incredibly detailed description and introduction to the camera – its features, technology, and applications. There are illustrations of the camera
and its accessories, tables of specifications, an exploded diagram of the camera,
and detailed guides to the use of the camera and accessories. There are also numerous color photos taken by the camera and its associated FD & FL lenses.

It’s a large 8 x 11 format and has 18 pages. The actual publication date is November 1979 – English Edition printed in Japan.

It’s available in my Etsy camera shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com

Thanks for stopping by! – Chris

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2020 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

Happy SUNday! – Recent Arrivals

Some new additions to our already crowded Yashica family of cameras.

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Our all-time favorite Yashica SLR.

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*** Yashica TL Electro X ***

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This one is from April 1973 and was made in the newly opened factory in Hong Kong.

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Hard to find Yashica Electro AX – second to the last M42 screw mount lens bodies.

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This is the only early Yashica SLR with a leatherette insert on the pentaprism. This one was made in November 1973.

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Yashica D TLR from late 1966.

Some of these will be appearing in our shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com in the coming weeks as well as some other arrivals.

Thanks for stopping by and have a beautiful day! – Chris

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2020 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

Yashica Electro AX – Yashica’s goofy automatic exposure SLR

Yashica was known to design many quirky cameras during its run of existence. Here’s what the New York Times had to say about the Electro AX on November 4, 1973.

“A NEW fully automatic 35mm single‐lens‐reflex camera with an electronically controlled shutter has recently been introduced by Yashica, Inc. in the United States. Called the Yashica Electro AX, the camera has actually been available for some time in Japan and Europe, but it is only now reaching the American market.

Unlike most of the fully automatic cameras currently being marketed, the Electro AX is designed so that the photographer selects the aperture he wants. An electronic exposure control circuit then automatically sets the shutter speed at any one of an infinite number of different settings from 1/1,000 of a second to a full 8 seconds. When set for manual operation (at the photographer’s choice) the user can manually select speeds in the usual gradations of from one second to 1/1,000 of a second, as well as a “B” setting for time exposures.

Because of the electronic focal plane metal shutter, the entire exposure system is solid-state without any delicate moving mechanical parts.

When focusing, the diaphragm is closed down to the aperture selected, but for dim light situations, the photographer can press a button on the front which opens the diaphragm while focusing, without affecting the actual exposure setting. One unusual feature of the Electro AX is a green signal light on top that glows when the shutter is open — a useful aid when the built‐in self-timer is used, or with long exposure shots.

The camera has a CdS solid-state sensor located behind the viewing mirror, in front of the shutter. The split image viewfinder has a microprism focusing spot in the center, and there are red and yellow exposure indicator arrows that light up in the viewfinder to warn of overexposure or very slow shutter speed (when on automatic).

Other features include a built‐in light shield operated by a lever on front to prevent light leaks through the viewfinder when the eyepiece is uncovered, an ASA range from 25 to 1600, a battery check lamp which also illuminates the exposure counter, and a double lock for the back cover which prevents accidental opening. The Electro AX is priced at under $600 with an f/1.2 lens, about $500 with an f/1.4 lens, or under $460 with f/1.7 lens.”

By serial number decoding, it looks like the first models were manufactured in March-April 1973 so as the article points out, there was quite a lag in releasing it in the US markets.

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A Japanese sales brochure dated early 1974 and I have another (not pictured) dated March 1973.

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The Electro AX was the second to the last M42 screw mount lens body cameras made by Yashica. It appears that the last model is the super hard to find Yashica FFT. BTW, I have no idea what if anything the FFT stands for.

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This Yashica FFT instruction booklet is dated June 1973. It would appear that this final M42 body came out just a few months after the Electro AX and they were in production at the same time and ended about the same time in early 1974.

An FFT in good condition is a very hard camera to find here in the US and I’m convinced it didn’t enjoy a long run in US camera stores. I would love to find some brochures in English and of course a good looking FFT.

Back to the Electro AX.

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The AX was one of the first Yashica SLRs to have the ability to shut a small curtain in the viewfinder to block light from entering during long exposures and “selfies”. It’s the little lever next to the eyepiece. It’s also the first Yashica SLR to have leatherette covering part of the pentaprism. An early prototype of the first Yashica Pentamatic had the same look before Yashica changed to an all-metal pentaprism.

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The big black button just above the self-timer lever is an Aperture Activator Button. Pressing it allowed the photographer to focus and compose at full aperture. The aperture would automatically close down to the selected setting once the Film Advance Lever was operated.

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On full auto, the camera would select the proper shutter speed given the aperture selected on the lens. A series of over and underexposure arrows would appear (when the shutter release button is pressed halfway down) in the viewfinder display indicating which f-stop to select.

The goofy comes in when switching to full manual. You would set the proper shutter speed and correct f-stop (aperture) on the lens based on readings from an external exposure (light) meter. In the manual mode, the AX can not meter thru the lens. Kinda dumb for an electronic camera with a computer brain.

Due to the design of the semi-transparent mirror, the following lenses can not be used on the Electro AX – Yashinon-DX 21mm f/3.3, the Auto Yashinon-DX 28mm f/2.8, and the Auto Yashinon-DX 50mm f/2, f/1.7, f/1.4.

The Electro AX was initially released with Auto Yashinon-DS lenses.

Thanks for stopping by. When I get the correct battery for it I hope to shoot a test roll and post the results. – Chris

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2020 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

In the Shop – New this week!

Hi all! I’ve added some new items in the shop this week from my collection. Stop by http://www.ccstudio2380.com if you see something that catches your eye and while there check out all of the neat things that are listed. Thanks!

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Have a great day and thanks for stopping by! – Chris

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2020 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

In the Shop – New for 2020

Hi all! I hope that your new year is going well and that this year brings a little peace to the world. I’ve listed a few new items in my camera shop which you can visit at http://www.ccstudio2380.com. The shop is hosted by Etsy so I can ship to almost every corner of the planet and you can use a variety of payments that fit your lifestyle.

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This is just a small sample of what I have available in the shop. If there’s something that you want and you don’t see it listed I may have it in my collection. Just send me a message at ccphotographyai@gmail.com

Thanks for stopping by! – Chris

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2020 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

Interesting Portrait – 1974

Unknown models and photographer. Scanned from a Yashica sales brochure.

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Scanned from a Yashica Electro AX sales brochure dated 1974. The translated caption is “Auto Yashinon-DS super wide-angle 20mm aperture f 11 automatic exposure”. The lens has a maximum aperture of f/ 3.5
The photographer and models are not credited. A quality image in an excellent brochure.

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The Yashica Electro AX. The last M42 screw mount lens camera made by Yashica (starting in 1973 and ending in early 1974).

Thanks for stopping by! – Chris

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2020 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

Happy SUNday!

Yashica’s last M42 mount camera. The FFT is seldom seen on online auction sites as it’s a fairly rare camera due to low production. The camera marked the end of a long line of 35mm SLRs made by Yashica that accepted the universal screw mount lenses.

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FFT instruction booklet dated June 1973

The camera was offered with the Auto Yashinon-DS 50mm f1.9 lens.

By the way, I have no idea what the FFT stands for if anything. If you do (or have a wild guess) let me know. The second to the last M42 camera made was the Electro AX. Both died in the spring of 1974.

If you’ve got a nice (working) example of this camera we are interested buyers. You can contact me at ccphotographyai@gmail.com

Thanks for stopping by! – Chris

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2019 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

Nicca Pentamatic!?

Stay with us and we’ll try to make our case. Recently discovered information has filled-in some of the missing links in the development of our favorite obsession camera. The mysterious and seldom seen Pentamatic ’35’… Yashica’s first SLR.

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A few interesting bits of info have come to our attention recently. We were alerted to an auction by our friend Paul Sokk (http://www.yashicatlr.com) that listed a 13.5 cm f/ 2.8 lens made by Taiho Optical Company –  Nicca Lens. Having never heard of the company, Taiho Optical, and knowing about Nicca’s history, we couldn’t figure out where and how there could be a Nicca connection.

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Let’s backtrack a bit with a quick history lesson. Yashima-Yashica was a very successful maker of high quality, low-cost twin-lens reflex cameras but hadn’t moved into the 35 mm market as of early 1957. It appears that the president and founder of Yashima-Yashica, Mr. Yoshimasa Ushiyama could see that although Yashica was successful building TLRs, the market for them would slowly diminish as new, smaller and easier to use 35 mm cameras would grab the marketplace. He wanted in but how?

Yashica had no experience with 35 mm cameras, especially rangefinder cameras with cloth focal-plane shutters. There were dozens of Leica copy cameras in Japan (and the world for that matter) but possible patents protected specific manufacturer’s shutter designs. If he could buy into an established company then he could use their shutter design and incorporate it with early Yashima-Yashica designs. In May of 1958, an opportunity presented itself. Nicca Camera Company was apparently experiencing financial difficulties and may have been on the brink of bankruptcy. Nicca cameras were well known and well respected – they made high quality 35 mm rangefinder cameras with focal-plane shutters. They used Nikkor lenses with the L39 screw mount. Mr. Ushiyama was in a rush to purchase Nicca before they went belly up. Advisers cautioned to wait until Nicca went bankrupt arguing that they would be able to acquire it for a better price. Mr. Ushiyama knew that that outcome of a bankruptcy could take longer than he was willing to wait and there would certainly be more suitors to compete with. So the deal went through… sort of. As best as we can glean from our research, a “religionist” “admonished” Mr. Ushiyama for rushing into the deal and cautioned that Yashica itself would suffer a “decline” if all of the transfer were made immediately.

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OK, OK! We give!!! We share your feelings dear reader –  what’s the connection between Nicca and the Pentamatic? Taking the advice of the religionist, Mr. Ushiyama created a new company. Nicca would become Taiho Optical Company. Say what? Nicca wasn’t absorbed into Yashica in May of 1958, instead, they became another company that could continue to operate with Yashica but without becoming Yashica. Simple. Confused? Mr. Ushiyama listened to his adviser so nothing bad happened. It appears that the former Nicca employees were now free to develop new processes and designs with the financial and technical support of the much larger Yashica. What did Yashica get for its money? Plenty it would seem. Access to years of 35 mm rangefinder manufacturing experience and access to a proven focal-plane shutter. Important steps in building a 35 mm single-lens reflex camera. We don’t know (yet) which one of the two companies came up with the design of what would become the Pentamatic. Was it mostly a Yashica design that had been kicking around for a while lacking a focal-plane shutter, or was it mostly a Nicca design that lacked the financial means to bring it to market? We feel that it was more than likely a 60 – 40 split with Nicca as the 60%. Just a hunch, no facts at the moment.

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Earliest known sales brochure for the Pentamatic ’35’. The best guess is that it was printed in the Spring of 1960.

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A machine translation of this page from inside of the brochure states clearly that Nicca and Yashica developed the Pentamatic.

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But what did the Taiho Optical Company make? Yashica didn’t make their own lenses, Tomioka Optical of Tokyo did. Was the former Nicca, now that it had become Taiho Optical, going to suddenly start making lenses? At the start of this blog, we mentioned that we were alerted to the existence of a 13.5 cm lens for sale with the Taiho Optical Company-Nicca Japan markings. Other than that, nothing.

So when did Mr. Ushiyama merge the two companies? He apparently listed to his adviser and waited eight long years before merging the two. From 1960 (when the Pentamatic was released) until 1968, when he not only made Yashica whole, but he also acquired long time lens supplier Tomioka Optical.

Now we know how the Pentamatic came to be and why it could be called the Nicca Pentamatic.

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Thanks for sticking with us. – Chris

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2019 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

Not what I expected…

Sometimes cameras that I purchase from online auction sites simply blow me away with the overall quality of the item. Sellers that tend to understate the condition of their gear and then deliver something unexpected (“looks good” is really “like new”). Occasionally cameras arrive and my reaction is just the opposite. But I have a wide range of acceptance because I look closely at the pictures of the item in the listing and ask questions when I’m not sure of something. No one likes bad surprises.

One area that I’m completely inflexible on is previous owner’s initials etched, carved, or engraved into the camera body or lens. If I’m told about it and shown a picture of it that’s fine – I can decide if I still want that piece of gear before I bid on it. Often an etching will be on a part of the camera that’s replaceable like the baseplate or even the film door.

Here’s an example of undisclosed damage from an engraving. I received this camera yesterday and it was described as looking like it was unused in the listing. I guess in fairness to the seller a camera can have an engraving and still technically be “unused”. Not in this instance, however.

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This engraving is on the camera’s right side near where the strap would go. That side was not shown in the listing photos. Go figure. If you look closely you’ll also see a hairline crack in the plastic just to the left of the “J”. The camera it turns out was very well used (or very well abused).

No worries, the camera is on its way back to the seller and they’ve promised a full refund. If the seller simply didn’t catch that there was an etched name or social security number, or driver’s license number (I’ve received all three on one camera before!) then I understand. But when it’s this obvious and you don’t mention it why bother going through the motions of sending it? Oh well.

Thanks for stopping by! Oh by the way, if you’re looking for accurately described and well taken care of cameras and photo gear, then a visit to my camera shop just might be the place to start. You can find my shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com (Etsy Pattern site). Everything I sell is from either my personal collection of gear or locally sourced cameras. Carol and I are always on the lookout for interesting gear so if you’ve got something you’re interested in selling please drop us a line and tell us what you have. We may be looking for that exact item to add to our collection.

Chris

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2019 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

 

In the Shop – 1970s Hippie Strap

They were everywhere! Almost every camera in the 1970s had one and some people owned two, three or more. Not many survived in good shape in the present day – here’s one of my “many”. Simply click the PayPal payment button below and I’ll have it off to you in a flash!

Genuine 1970s Hippie Camera Strap for your SLR or DSLR – Far Out Man!

Fabric, leather, and metal - hippie camera strap straight from the 1970s. Add instant karma to your modern DSLR or jazz up your vintage SLR. This is one of the many I own and it's time to let a few go. This one is in excellent condition with solid stitching, good leather, and nice hardware. Its got the elastic bands for holding your film cans too. I'll mail it nearly worldwide and I'll mail it FOR FREE within the USA! International orders please request a shipping quote to your country before placing your order.

$24.75

Thanks for stopping by and be sure to visit my camera shop (on Etsy) at http://www.ccstudio2380.com for some other great bits of photo gear.

Chris

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2019 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.