Montauk Point Lighthouse, Long Island

The lighthouse at Montauk Point, Long Island, New York is one of my favorite spots to visit ever since I was a child growing up on Long Island. As a kid, the main attractions for me were – the ocean, the countless rocks in that ocean (big and small), the hills (Long Islanders are hill challenged) and finally the lighthouse itself. As I got older, the main attraction was the lighthouse with the other ‘likes’ fading into the background. When I earned my New York driver’s licence, Montauk was my first long drive from my home by myself. When I became a certified SCUBA diver, the waters near the lighthouse looked tempting for a dive but the great whites known to frequent the cold waters off Eastern Long Island kept me ashore – so I headed to Florida instead.

While going through some of my many mountains of slides from my collection, I came across these images of the lighthouse. The first set of photographs are from August 1972 and were shot with my Yashica TL Electro-X mostly using the normal Yashinon 50mm lens. The second set of images are from 2002 when I traveled to New York with my family for their first visit to Montauk. The 1972 images show how completely the original Kodak Ektachrome slides have degraded over the years.

img_20161217_0001

August 1972. Yashica TL Electro-X with f/ 1.7 50mm Yashinon lens with 2x teleconverter on Ektachrome 64.

img_20161217_0002

August 1972. The lighthouse in need of a serious restoration. I believe it was still under the control of the U.S. Coast Guard at that time. It’s obvious that 40+ year old Kodak Ektachrome didn’t hold up well – even when stored properly. Most of the vivid original colors have faded and the slide lacks depth.

img_20161216_0028

July 2002. The lighthouse and grounds were looking much better after the restoration. Canon F-1 with FD24mm f/ 2.8 lens on Kodachrome. My son is the little one climbing up the hill (as I had done hundreds of times before).

img_20161216_0030

July 2002. Canon F-1 with FD24mm f/ 2.8 lens on Kodachrome.

img_20161216_0036

T.J. on the rocks… just like me in the 1950s.

img_20161216_0033

The automated light of 2002. Wonderful view from up top too.

img_20161216_0023

Captivating views from up top.

img_20161216_0037_new

Gotta love the rocks!

If you ever get a chance to travel to Long Island, then the Montauk Point Lighthouse must be on your “to visit list”. It’s very photogenic and lends itself well to the digital age. There are images that a good camera phone today can capture that were a serious challenge to film photographers just 15 years ago. Happy shooting!

Chris

 

Kamakura Daibutsu

My wife and I lived in Yokohama, Naka-ku (Honmoku) from the Summer of 1977 to early Spring of 1980. We totally enjoyed our time in this wonderful country and are hopeful we will be able to return again. We had our favorite spots – Sankei-en and Kamakura being two of our most favorite. As with any well known attraction, the Great Buddha at Kamakura has been photographed from every angle imaginable. I’ve always enjoyed exploring angles that may not have been tried before.

19987739784_b6b238428b_o

July 1979. Canon F-1 with FD 24mm lens on Kodachrome 25.

21915088979_a912894e1a_o

Kodachrome 25. Bright sun. Canon F-1 with FD 24mm lens. It’s what film photography was (is) all about.

20847829440_15c046a3df_o

More traditional view of the Great Buddha. Steaming hot July day on the Kanto Plain. Yashica TL Electro-X on Kodachrome 64.

21478741664_f6ef540008_o

Gotta have a tourist shot! We love the antennas on top of Mt. Fuji!

So many things will have changed in Japan since we were last there but they’ll be plenty that will stay the same… forever. Kamakura is one of them.

Thanks for the visit!

More ‘Found Film’

We recently posted a short article about the good and bad sides of ‘found film’. It’s always exciting whenever we acquire a new camera and find film from the previous owner. We enjoy trying to figure out what year the film may be from. In this case, the 120 roll is Kodak Ektachrome-X – color slide film or reversal film if you prefer. It was found in a Yashica-A twin-lens reflex (TLR) medium format camera.

dscf3133

Yashica-A TLR and some ‘found film’. In this case some Kodak Ektachrome-X color slide film.

The camera (Yashica-A) is from October 1959. Its general appearance would indicate that it saw limited use as the camera is in near mint condition with only a few small detracting marks. It works perfectly and the optics are sharp and clear. The shutter is accurate and it’s ready to shoot with again. It always amazes me how many cameras we find with half used rolls of film.

dscf3135

Nice little addition to our vintage film collection.

We’re not going to get this roll developed. Our experience with the most recent roll was basically a waste of money – and a bit scary as you never know if the previous photographer shot something bad. We’ll let this one alone.

If anyone can give us an idea as to when this style of film was in use we would love to know.

Many thanks for your visit!

Chris

You can visit us on flickr at https://www.flickr.com/photos/127540935@N08/

 

 

Totally Off Track… フジペット

Occasionally we can get off track here on the ‘Fanatic’… well more often than not. Here’s a quick post about a rather rare camera on this side of the world.

The Fujipet!!! フジペット By Fuji Photo Film Co., Ltd.

Some have classified it as a toy camera as it is made very simply with lightweight materials and a plastic lens. In Japan (we believe the only market where it was sold) it was designed for use by children, “adult” women and beginners. At only ¥1950 it was inexpensive even by today’s standards. In our opinion here on the ‘Fanatic’, the Fujipet was no more a toy camera then the extremely simple and very popular Kodak Instamatic series of cameras.

The Fujipet is a true 6 x 6 cm medium format camera using 120 roll film.

DSCF1477

Rare Fujipet set from 1958.

28755215391_df2c833878_o

Shizue is confused! One of these cameras is considered by many to be a toy camera while the other was thought to be a serious camera. Each sold over a million plus units. Each has a plastic lens. The Kodak is mostly a plastic body with some internal metal parts and the Fujipet is plastic and aluminum and actually has a rather substantial feel to it. Of course the Kodak used 126 film in plastic cartridges and the Fuji? Professional 120 roll film producing 6 x 6 cm negatives. Toy?

DSCF1480

Original users manual. Cool Fuji logo.

DSCF1484

The coolest name around!

DSCF1485

Space age viewfinder! Straight from the 1950s!

We will be running a roll of 120 film through soon… stay tuned!

Many thanks, Chris and Carol