Kyocera (Yashica) T from 1986

Another ‘Modern Classic’ as we like to call them. For Kyocera, this was the first fully branded Kyocera camera in the famous T* Series of point and shoot autofocus 35mm film cameras. The Yashica T which was made by Kyocera in 1985 was technically the first.

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For the domestic market in Japan, this was what you got for your ¥50,700 ($301 USD) plus an extra 2,000 JPY for the case. No zoom lens and no true user inputs except for the flash. What you did get was a sophisticated Carl Zeiss Tessar f/ 3.5 35mm lens with the famous T* coated optics. This is a true point and shoot camera designed to take the highest quality images just short of owning an SLR.

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The T-D (date) model weighs about 356 grams without film but with the heavy 2CR5 lithium 6v battery installed. The date function is powered by a CR2025 battery but at this point, I haven’t installed one as the date function only goes to 2019. The camera automatically sets the ISO for DX coded films from 50 to 1,600. There’s a cover over the lens that opens when the shutter is pressed and then slowly closes over the lens again. It looks to be semi-transparent from what I can tell. Not sure how you would keep the cover open to clean the lens.

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Not much in the way of user input except to kill the flash. There’s an analog film indicator, simple on-off slide switch and a self-timer switch. No LCD screen to fail over time (which is a good thing).

I’m pretty excited to give the camera a go on a walkabout and to eventually compare its performance to my Yashica L AF with similar features. See my review and test of the Yashica L AF here.

Thanks for stopping by and be sure to check out my camera shop on Etsy at http://www.ccstudio2380.com and on eBay at https://www.ebay.com/str/auntfotosphotography

Chris

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2020 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

Friday Fotos! – Classic Rangefinders

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Image courtesy of Paul Sokk www.yashicatlr.com

Recently my good friend Paul Sokk added this wonderful Leica IIIc to his collection of 35mm rangefinder cameras from the late 1940s and 1950s. The Leica is an original design made in Germany and the Nicca and Leotax are considered copies or clones made in Japan.

The Leica IIIc (front) is from 1946-47, the Nicca 3-F (middle) is from 1956, and the Leotax K is from 1955-58. These cameras use what is known as L39 (LTM) screw mount lenses of which literally thousands were made and thousands are still available today in a wide range of focal lengths.

If you’re looking to get into film photography with a totally manual camera then these should be on your list to take a closer look at.

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On the left, the Zeiss Ikon Contax IIIa and on the right the Nicca built Tower Type-3.

Pictured above are a couple of contenders from 1951. The Contax is an original design from the 1930s and was manufactured in Germany. The Tower branded camera was made by Nicca in Japan and features a Nippon Kogaku Nikkor f/ 2 5cm lens. The Contax sports a Carl Zeiss Sonnar f/ 1.5 50mm lens. The Contax also has an attached selenium cell exposure meter that can be useful for setting the correct aperture and shutter speed. A word of caution about these 70-year-old meters, if they are working (responding to light) then assume that it’s not accurate until you can check it against a modern meter. Most of these types of meters have long since failed.

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Zeiss Ikon Contax IIIa with selenium meter (top center) flap opened.

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Paul’s beautiful Leica IIIc

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Paul’s gorgeous Leotax F with Topcor f/ 3.5 5cm lens.

Thanks for stopping by and I hope my post stirs some interest in these wonderful cameras. I do have a Tower (Nicca) set available in my camera shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com if you care to take a look at it, pop on over.

NiccaTower T3 Logo

Take care and stay safe! – Chris

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2020 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

Interesting Portrait – 1974

Unknown models and photographer. Scanned from a Yashica sales brochure.

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Scanned from a Yashica Electro AX sales brochure dated 1974. The translated caption is “Auto Yashinon-DS super wide-angle 20mm aperture f 11 automatic exposure”. The lens has a maximum aperture of f/ 3.5
The photographer and models are not credited. A quality image in an excellent brochure.

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The Yashica Electro AX. The last M42 screw mount lens camera made by Yashica (starting in 1973 and ending in early 1974).

Thanks for stopping by! – Chris

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2020 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

Happy SUNday! – Aloha Fujica

One of our favorites – this stunning all-red Fuji Fujica DL-20 (Auto Mate) from our collection of neat Fuji compact 35mm cameras.

This one is still new in its original box from 1983. It was Fuji’s first drop-in loading camera (pretty neat back then). It’s built like a tank and features a super sharp 38mm Fujinon 3 element lens. Easy zone focussing and built-in flash.

We’ve added this hard to find Fujica to our online shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com. With its bright red finish and colorful box, it makes a perfect Christmas gift for your photo bug or collector. It’s been tested with fresh batteries and everything works as it should.

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It’s available at http://www.ccstudio2380.com

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It’s a cool little piece of history – a modern classic as we like to call them. Thanks for stopping by and have a great day! – Chris

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2019 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

New In the Shop – 11.30.2019

Hi all! Here’s a small sample of what I have on sale in my camera shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com

I ship nearly worldwide and I ship super fast. All items are from my collection of vintage (and not so vintage) cameras and photogear that I’ve collected over the years.

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Snip 11.30.19

My shop is always open at http://www.ccstudio2380.com

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If you’re looking for something specific let me know what it is and I may have it or can get it for you! Contact me at ccphotographyai@gmail.com

I’ll be listing some additional classic and rare cameras in the coming days so check out my shop often at http://www.ccstudio2380.com

Thanks for stopping by! – Chris

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2019 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

Time Capsule – 1960

Another look at this post from last year. New evidence shows that the Pentamatic (original model) was released in Japan in January 1960 but as of this reblog still no instruction booklets found printed in Japanese – only English. The Pentamatic made its first appearance in the US around March-April 1960 with the first ads appearing in May.

Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic

yashica pentamatic set The original Pentamatic.

A nice example of Yashica’s first 35mm SLR – the Pentamatic. Also known as the Pentamatic ’35’ in its earliest advertisements and sales brochures. This particular camera is from August 1960 – the same month that Yashica started production of the Pentamatic II – a model that was destined for the Japanese home market and not for world export. The Pentamatic II stayed in production only until January 1961 when it was replaced a few months later with the Pentamatic S. The original Pentamatic was first produced in December 1959 but widescale production didn’t begin until January 1960. As of this update (Oct 11, 2018), I still haven’t found evidence of an instruction booklet printed in Japanese – only English booklets so far. I would think that there must be booklets in Japanese and at least 2 or 3 other languages but none found. The Pentamatic II…

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Zunow SLR – 1958

Another look at this hyper-rare SLR.

Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic

One of the rarest early Japanese 35mm SLR cameras ever made. The Zunow SLR (below).

zunow beauty Zunow SLR 1958.

This gorgeous Zunow sold for a cool ¥ 1,880,000 (about $16,700 USD)!

The Yashica Pentamatic (below) just sold for $16,598 less!

DSCF6236 Yashica Pentamatic 35mm SLR. Yashica’s first ever. A cousin to the Zunow? We think so.

We believe designers and engineers from Zunow and Nicca played a big part in bringing the Pentamatic to market by early 1960.

Thanks for your visit! To find out more about Yashica and the Zunow connection stay a bit and check out our blog here on the ‘Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic’!

Chris and Carol ^.^

Please respect that all content, including photos and text are property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2017 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

View original post

Tanaka Optical Company, Ltd. – the 1950s

The Tanaka Optical Co., Ltd. was a camera and lens manufacturer with a factory in Kawasaki, Kanagawa Prefecture, Japan during the 1950s. Not many would have seen their cameras (35mm Leica type rangefinders) and fewer still their lenses for L39 Leica screw mount cameras. Their first camera was the Tanack 35 which was developed in 1952 and released in 1953. The company was gone by 1959.

There’s conflicting information on the web about whether Tanaka made just a few cameras and no lenses. This I believe is definitive proof that they did make cameras and lenses.

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Complete lens box from about 1955.

Tanar Lens Box

The side panel says it all – “Manufactured in Kawasaki Japan by Tanaka Optical Co., Ltd. Manufacturers of Tanack Cameras, Tanar Lenses & Accessories”.

There’s still a lot to learn about the early years of this small camera manufacturer. At this time, I haven’t been able to find evidence that they made lenses for other camera makers. My guess is that they did but no proof yet.

Do you have more information about Tanaka, Tanar lenses and Tanack cameras? Please feel free to share what you know with me and I’ll gladly share that with my readers.

Thanks – Chris

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2019 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

Fuji Panorama Cardia – a plastic fantastic from 1991

One of the first dedicated 35 mm panorama compact cameras from Fuji Photo Film Company. It was available only in Japan and was released in December 1991. Actually a sophisticated camera a notch or two above being just a point and shoot – debateable.

There’s so little information about this wonderful camera on the web, I hope this post helps a bit for those interested in this format and camera.

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It’s not as basic as it seems. This camera was released for the Japanese domestic market in December 1991 and listed for 15,800 JPY (about $123 USD).

It’s a dedicated panorama format 35 mm film camera (13 x 36 mm actual image size). The panorama setting is not adjustable.

1. Opens and closes the lens cover and when closed locks the shutter button.

2. Flash on/off switch.

3. Fujinon 28 mm f8 glass lens – 3 elements in 3 groups. The fixed focus lens focuses from 1.5 m to infinity switchable to landscape mode.

4. CdS light receiver.

5. Two position ISO selector switch.

6. Landscape Mode Switch “Far-view Mode Lever”.

7. Albada bright frame finder.

8. Shutter release button.

9. Manual strobe/flash.

The aperture is “automatically” adjusted for lower light levels and the camera will give a low-light warning in the viewfinder. It’s been reported by a Japanese blogger that the aperture was capable of f4 to f16 but that is not backed up by data from Fujifilm that I can find.

The shutter is fixed to fire at 1/100th of a second.

I’ve scanned a few pages from the instruction pamphlet (below).

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Take notice of the clearly marked “CdS light receiver” vice exposure meter. It could be just a difference in the machine translation from what was meant in the original Japanese text.

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Specifications from Fuji confirms that the lens is a Fujinon f8 28 mm wide angle with glass optics – 3 elements in 3 groups (you’ll find that info in line 4).

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Unboxing a classic.

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This camera set is available in my Etsy studio shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com

Thanks for stopping by! – Chris

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2019 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

 

New in the Shop – Graflex Graphic 35

graphic 35 with border

In my camera shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com – it’s on sale for $31.27 + shipping

Vintage from the 1950s

Classic Graflex Graphic 35
35mm Rangefinder Film Camera
Rodenstock Graflar 50mm f3.5 Lens
Prontor SVS Shutter

*One Owner
*Smoke and Pet Free Home
*Tested without Film

All shutter speeds sound accurate
with the exception of 1 second which
is sluggish. Bulb does work nicely.
I did not test the flash connection but it looks great.
I do not test the self-timer
on vintage 1950s cameras so it
may work or it may not.
The aperture blades look good and
are snappy. The lens is generally clear
but I do see some dust and specs of dirt.

The rangefinder is sharp – it focuses easily.
The viewfinder is bright and clean but with
a light haze (no fungus) and the haze
is very slight.

Overall it is a very nice example of this
classic camera from Graflex. I believe it
would do well as a user camera again. It is
from my personal collection.

I’ve provided clear, accurate pictures of
the camera so that you may judge its
condition for yourself. Some minor dust
here and there but no corrosion, dents, or
engravings.

I mail daily and often and it will be well
packaged for a safe journey to you.
It will be mailed in the USA via USPS Priority
Mail with tracking and insurance.

Please check out my other great listings here in
this Etsy shop and at http://www.ccstudio2380.com

Thanks for stopping by! – Chris