New Arrivals

Hi all… thanks for stopping by! Just in time for Father’s Day I’m offering a nice 10% discount on almost everything in my shop – CC Design Studios at http://www.ccstudio2380.com

Lots of unique items from our vast collection of photo gear and other collectibles from our travels over the years. Here’s a small sample…

We also have a bunch of gear and cameras that haven’t been listed yet. If there’s a particular item you’ve been searching for lets us know as we just might have it. Contact us here or at ccphotographyai@gmail.com

Comments are always welcomed as I’ve learned quite a bit from reader feedback. As always, thanks for stopping by and while you’re at it, feel free to visit my camera shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com (CC Design Studios hosted by Etsy). – Chris Whelan

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris, Chasing Classic Cameras with Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2021 Chasing Classic Cameras with Chris (Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic), Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

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Rare Zunow 35mm SLR Set

A very rare, no let me say, ultra rare Zunow camera and lens set is for sale via an online auction in Japan. The Zunow was made in extremely limited numbers in 1959 and few remain this complete in the present collector world. Yashica’s first 35mm SLR was designed in early to mid-1959 shortly after Yashica acquired Nicca camera in 1958. The Yashica Pentamatic ’35’ started production in December 1959 with the first units reaching the US market in the Spring of 1960. The Pentamatic and the Zunow share some similar DNA as Yashica purchased lenses from Zunow (mostly cine lenses) and they were for a time dual branded.

Not often seen together original box, lens cap, case with strap, camera body and lens.
Beautiful together.
Here’s a snip of a completed auction for just the brochure.
Here’s my first Pentamatic ’35’ with a super-rare Tominon and Yashica branded wide-angle lens.

Looking at the Zunow and the Pentamatic it’s not hard to let your imagination run wild that maybe Zunow, Nicca, and Yashica all shared some design features with one another over a drink or two at a local bar on the outskirts of Tokyo.

This could be another sales brochure or brochure and instruction booklet combination.
Zunow and Yashica branded box for an 8mm cine camera lens.
An advertisement for a rare dual offering from a well-known Japanese camera dealer a few years back.

If you’re so inclined to bid on the current set online, here’s the link https://www.easyauctionjapan.com/YahooAuction-Yahoo-607566-j736361126.html

Thanks for stopping by! Enjoy your day and please feel free to visit my camera shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com

Chris

SUNday Spotlight – visible instamatic

Kodak Instamatic X-15F (1976-1988).

Comments are always welcomed as I’ve learned quite a bit from reader feedback. As always, thanks for stopping by and while you’re at it, feel free to visit my camera shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com (CC Design Studios hosted by Etsy). – Chris Whelan

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris, Chasing Classic Cameras with Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2021 Chasing Classic Cameras with Chris (Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic), Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

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Happy SUNday! – Remembering Expo 67

It’s hard to believe that Expo 67 was 54 years ago – I remember most of our trip and stay in Montreal but not that much of the event except, I remember meeting one of the hostesses (not these exact ladies) and having my picture taken next to her and another taken with a Canadian Mountie. I know where the Mountie picture is but I can’t find the other. Perhaps I’ll scan the Mountie pic for another Sunday.

Perfect 1960s style just right for Expo 67.
The Kodak Instamatic 104 camera she’s holding was released in July 1965 and retailed for just under $20 (that’s quite a bit of 1960s money). The 104 was the first to feature the new flashcube and like all early Instamatics used the newly developed 126 film cartridge. The 104 was replaced by the 124 in 1968.

Comments are always welcomed as I’ve learned quite a bit from reader feedback. As always, thanks for stopping by and while you’re at it, feel free to visit my camera shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com (CC Design Studios hosted by Etsy). – Chris Whelan

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris, Chasing Classic Cameras with Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2021 Chasing Classic Cameras with Chris (Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic), Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

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Zeiss Ikon Contax IIIa

Carl Zeiss Sonnar f/ 1.5 50mm lens shown here with a Zeiss Ikon slip-on lens hood (shade).

This lovely camera is from 1951 and features a built-in exposure meter.

Shown with the meter flap open for business. This image was taken with my Nikon D800 in my studio as a test shot – no post processing.

I haven’t had a chance to run a roll of film through this beauty yet. All levers, knobs, buttons, and dials are working as is the meter. My list of film test cameras is quite extensive so the likelihood that this one will see film anytime soon is slim, very slim.

A quick search on eBay shows a nice selection of these available in all sorts of condition and states of operation. A recent set with body, lens, and box went for $450 (similar to mine) in working condition. I would think around $350 to $400 is reasonable for a clean example and having the box is always nice and in this case worth the $50. I’d give the Contax IIIa a chase factor of 6 – they’re out there so finding one isn’t a problem but finding a 70-year-old camera in full functioning condition is the hard part. Expect some issues that may need to be addressed and of course without service (CLA) little guarantee of continued function. It does make an awesome display camera amongst my other 35mm rangefinders so it’s got that going for it.

Comments are always welcomed as I’ve learned quite a bit from reader feedback. As always, thanks for stopping by and while you’re at it, feel free to visit my camera shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com (CC Design Studios hosted by Etsy). – Chris Whelan

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris, Chasing Classic Cameras with Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2021 Chasing Classic Cameras with Chris (Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic), Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

https://www.buymeacoffee.com/chasingacoffee

Picture Perfect Polaroid

I’ve always had a soft spot for sharp looking Polaroids and this one fit the bill perfectly.

Polaroid Land Model 350. The Zeiss Ikon designed rangefinder was a nice feature.
The release price was around $150 which in 1971 (the year I graduated from high school) was a ton of money.

A 3 element glass lens (114mm f8.8) produced crisp images (as crisp as Polaroid film could go).

Beautiful case in better than expected condition given its age.

Made for only a short period of time (1969-1971) this model used Polaroid 100 Instant Packfilm. Here’s a little blurb about the future of Packfilm (https://support.polaroid.com/hc/en-us/articles/115012363267-Will-you-reintroduce-Polaroid-packfilm-).

This one was in our collection back in 2011 and has since moved on to another collector. If you can find a clean one for your collection I strongly suggest this model or the next one up, the 450. Chase factor 5 (easy to find but tough in mint condition).

Comments are always welcomed as I’ve learned quite a bit from reader feedback. As always, thanks for stopping by and while you’re at it, feel free to visit my camera shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com (CC Design Studios hosted by Etsy). – Chris Whelan

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris, Chasing Classic Cameras with Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2021 Chasing Classic Cameras with Chris (Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic), Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

https://www.buymeacoffee.com/chasingacoffee

Monday’s Camera – 1936 Hansa Canon

I wish! If it was the real camera, Canon’s first, it would be worth around ten thousand dollars in average working condition and well a lot more in mint condition. Instead this is a replica of that very first Canon made by Canon to celebrate the 75th anniversary of Canon (2012).

A 1:1.4 scale model (replica) of the original HANSA Canon 35mm rangefinder camera.
Like most of my collectibles this one is still unopened and un-played with.
The HANSA Canon story.
BTW, the original lens was made by Nikon for Canon. See image below.
The real thing. This is what an original Hansa Canon looks like and it’s available online for around $17.5K on eBay 353374854594

Since the real thing is beyond my and most people’s budgets, then this fine replica will just have to do. The HANSA Canon existed at the same time as the original 1930s Leicas. Which one was the better camera?

The replica is available in my camera shop.

Comments are always welcomed as I’ve learned quite a bit from reader feedback. As always, thanks for stopping by and while you’re at it, feel free to visit my camera shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com (CC Design Studios hosted by Etsy). – Chris Whelan

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris, Chasing Classic Cameras with Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2021 Chasing Classic Cameras with Chris (Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic), Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

https://www.buymeacoffee.com/chasingacoffee

Friday’s Camera – Mamiya M645

Certainly a classic worthy of a chase. Beautiful lines, excellent features, awesome accessories – oh, and a wide selection of quality Mamiya-Sekor lenses.

This is an early model of the M645 – probably 1975 or so.

Interchangeable lenses, backs, finders, focusing screens, winders and probably a few bits I overlooked.

If you’re looking to explore medium-format photography and you want a camera that can be as creative as you and be used like a 35mm SLR, then the M645 is the way to go. Look for clean and damage free examples that haven’t been beaten to near death by a professional wedding or studio photog (no offense to those pros but I wouldn’t want their cameras).

Comments are always welcomed as I’ve learned quite a bit from reader feedback. As always, thanks for stopping by and while you’re at it, feel free to visit my camera shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com (CC Design Studios hosted by Etsy). – Chris Whelan

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris, Chasing Classic Cameras with Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2021 Chasing Classic Cameras with Chris (Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic), Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

Tuesday’s Camera – Yashica A Twin-lens Reflex

We love Yashicas here on the blog and I can’t tell you how many enjoyable hours have been spent chasing these classic beauties from the 1950s.

This one was made in 1962 and features Yashikor lenses (the bottom lens is the “taking lens” and the top lens is the “viewing lens”.

As simple as simple gets so you’re likely to find one of these in a fully functioning condition. Not much can go wrong with these unless they’ve been abused or stored improperly.
The focus knob is on the right and the film advance knob is on the left. Simple.
The little door on the back has a red plastic window under it so that you can see which exposure you’re on as you’re advancing the film. Simple.
An accessory shoe and the two film spool knobs.
Opening and closing the camera is done by this rather large knob on the bottom.
You’ll get 12 exposures from a roll of 120 roll film, either color negative, color transparencies, or black and white negatives in a large 6 x 6 cm (2 1/4 x 2 1/4″). BTW, that is the backside of the taking lens. If you look closely you can see the leaf shutter inside the lens.
What a deal! $29.95 and the leather case for 1/5th the cost.
One of the easiest instruction booklets to follow. The Yashica A was made for beginner photogs on a budget.

So there you have it, our pick of the day. If you’re looking to get into medium format film photography then give this Yashica model a try. Use my example as a guide as to what to look for when you’re looking at purchasing one for yourself. No corrosion, complete leatherette coverings, clean and clear lenses, and no missing parts. Good luck!

May I suggest a visit to my good friend Paul Sokk’s site at http://www.yashicatlr.com/66ModelsPage1.html for some of the best information you’ll find anywhere about all things Yashica, Nicca, Leotax, and more.

Comments are always welcomed as I’ve learned quite a bit from reader feedback. As always, thanks for stopping by and while you’re at it, feel free to visit my camera shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com (CC Design Studios hosted by Etsy). – Chris Whelan

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris, Chasing Classic Cameras with Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2021 Chasing Classic Cameras with Chris (Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic), Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

Hansa Self-Timer from the 1950s and its relationship with Canon

Before built-in self-timers were available on cameras there had to be a way to remotely trigger the shutter so that the photographer could get into the picture or to prevent camera shake when shooting at slow shutter speeds. That’s where this little gizmo came in (and dozens more like it).

They’re very popular with classic camera collectors and this gem sold within 24 hours of listing it in my camera shop (www.ccstudio2380.com).

More than likely only a few manufacturers made these things for other companies and collecting all of the different models and versions can be a whole fun branch of camera collecting.
They simply screwed into the shutter button just like a cable release and with the action of a mechanical timer would fire the shutter. Usually anywhere from 5 to 10 seconds or just enough time to get in the shot.
Hansa refers to the Omiya Photo Supply Company. Please see http://camera-wiki.org/wiki/%C5%8Cmiya

Interestingly back in 1936 the first Canon camera made after their name change from “Kwanon” had the word “Hansa” engraved on the top of the camera and that camera is commonly referred to as the “Hansa Canon”. To my eye the way Hansa is written on the case of this timer is the same as Hansa was engraved on the Canon. The “H” and “A” being slightly modified by the 1950s. Certainly the “S” is spot on. For more about this bit of interesting Canon history please visit https://www.canonrangefinder.org/Canon_Hansa.htm

So if you’re looking to collect something different from the 1950s and it’s related to photo gear, then these self-timers can provide hours of fun searching and researching. Heck, I’ve seen the Hansa timer in about every color case you can imagine from this striking green to blue, and yellow!

By the way, the little “Hc” in the circle just may relate back to “Hansa Canon”. Something to think about.

Comments are always welcomed as I’ve learned quite a bit from reader feedback. As always, thanks for stopping by and while you’re at it, feel free to visit my camera shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com (CC Design Studios hosted by Etsy). – Chris Whelan

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris, Chasing Classic Cameras with Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2021 Chasing Classic Cameras with Chris (Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic), Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.