Hansa Self-Timer from the 1950s and its relationship with Canon

Before built-in self-timers were available on cameras there had to be a way to remotely trigger the shutter so that the photographer could get into the picture or to prevent camera shake when shooting at slow shutter speeds. That’s where this little gizmo came in (and dozens more like it).

They’re very popular with classic camera collectors and this gem sold within 24 hours of listing it in my camera shop (www.ccstudio2380.com).

More than likely only a few manufacturers made these things for other companies and collecting all of the different models and versions can be a whole fun branch of camera collecting.
They simply screwed into the shutter button just like a cable release and with the action of a mechanical timer would fire the shutter. Usually anywhere from 5 to 10 seconds or just enough time to get in the shot.
Hansa refers to the Omiya Photo Supply Company. Please see http://camera-wiki.org/wiki/%C5%8Cmiya

Interestingly back in 1936 the first Canon camera made after their name change from “Kwanon” had the word “Hansa” engraved on the top of the camera and that camera is commonly referred to as the “Hansa Canon”. To my eye the way Hansa is written on the case of this timer is the same as Hansa was engraved on the Canon. The “H” and “A” being slightly modified by the 1950s. Certainly the “S” is spot on. For more about this bit of interesting Canon history please visit https://www.canonrangefinder.org/Canon_Hansa.htm

So if you’re looking to collect something different from the 1950s and it’s related to photo gear, then these self-timers can provide hours of fun searching and researching. Heck, I’ve seen the Hansa timer in about every color case you can imagine from this striking green to blue, and yellow!

By the way, the little “Hc” in the circle just may relate back to “Hansa Canon”. Something to think about.

Comments are always welcomed as I’ve learned quite a bit from reader feedback. As always, thanks for stopping by and while you’re at it, feel free to visit my camera shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com (CC Design Studios hosted by Etsy). – Chris Whelan

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris, Chasing Classic Cameras with Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2021 Chasing Classic Cameras with Chris (Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic), Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

Yashica TL Electro X – one of Yashica’s most popular 35mm SLRs – ever!

The venerable TL Electro X

Far left is the TL Electro X in silver chrome (it also was available in all black) and on the right the TL Electro X ITS which was only available in pro-black with the gold electron symbol on the pentaprism.
Not to overlook the quality of the lenses from Yashica which were made in-house by Tomioka Optical. Here’s an Auto Yashinon DS-M 50mm f1.4 – super sharp lens (and fast).

If you’re looking to acquire a true classic 35mm SLR that will ease you into film photography, then I highly recommend getting this model Yashica. They were produced in rather large quantities during the late 1960s through the mid-1970s and if you find one that looks as nice as this one (and is a one owner) then the likelihood of getting one in fully working condition goes way up. Avoid online sellers that provide fuzzy pics and vague descriptions – look for sellers that will answer your direct questions as to the functional condition of the camera. The good news is that this Yashica uses a very common battery – I’m using an Energizer A544-6V alkaline (also known as an LR44). The battery provides the correct voltage with no drop-off over time.

BTW, this one was made in the then newest Yashica factory in Hong Kong and is marked “Hong Kong” on the bottom plate vice “Japan” which would be marked on the right side back of the top plate. This one will be leaving my collection soon as I am currently downsizing my camera collection. You can watch for it in my online camera shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com

Comments are always welcomed as I’ve learned quite a bit from reader feedback. As always, thanks for stopping by and while you’re at it, feel free to visit my camera shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com (CC Design Studios hosted by Etsy). – Chris Whelan

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris, Chasing Classic Cameras with Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2021 Chasing Classic Cameras with Chris (Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic), Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

New in my Camera Shop – March 26

Hi all! We’ve been very busy adding items from our collections of things into our camera shop (CC Design Studios) at http://www.ccstudio2380.com this past week. Here’s a little peek at what’s been added.

Plus lots more!

Thanks for stopping by and be sure to stop by my shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com – Chris

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2021 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

Digital time machine by Fujifilm

Just a quick post to introduce you (again) to a great little time machine. Take a simple and in this case inexpensive digital mirrorless camera (Fujifilm X-A10) mount a Fotodiox adapter behind some vintage 35mm camera lens and suddenly your older lenses have a new life.

In this set-up, a Fujifilm X-A10 digital mirrorless camera, a Fotodiox Pro FD-FX adapter, and a Canon FL 50mm f1.8 lens from around 1965.

Set your camera to aperture priority and select the proper lens focal length in the camera’s menu, set to manual focus and you’re good to go.

In this example I’ve mounted a vintage Spiratone 135mm f2.8 lens on a Fotodiox M42-FX adapter. The ‘FX’ identifies the mount found on Fujifilm digital camera bodies. The ‘M42’ indicates the type of mount on this lens. M42 is also known as a universal screw mount and is used on film cameras like Yashica, Pentax, Fujica, and a bunch more.

This image of the ferns below was shot using the Canon FL 50mm f1.8 lens and the appropriate adapter. Captured at f2.8 at about one meter.

f2.8
f8 or f11

This image of the same ferns below was taken using the Spiratone Tc 135mm f2.8 lens nearly fully wide open at f4 from three meters.

If you’re like me you have a bunch of beautiful vintage lenses just sitting around looking good in your display cabinet. Now and then you’ll shoot a roll of film and then it’s back into the cabinet. By purchasing a few inexpensive adapters for use on your mirrorless camera these classic lenses can see the literal light of day again. Remember that when these lenses were new they cost big bucks back in the 1960s, 1970s, and 1980s. Why let that investment go to waste.

Thanks for stopping by and be sure to stop by my shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com – Chris

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2021 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

Belated St. Paddy’s Day!

New York Mets St. Patrick’s Day green ballcap.

My versatile Fujifilm X-A10 mounted with some vintage Canon glass. The best of old and new.

Thanks for stopping by and be sure to stop by my shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com – Chris

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2021 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

Looking through vintage glass – fun with classic lenses.

Maidenhair ferns at f2.8 – soft non-distracting background

This stunning image (above) was taken through a lens that was made in Japan in the 1950s. What I love about using these well-cared for bits of photographic history is that they produce a level of clarity and sharpness but without the razor sharp and sometimes unnatural look you get with today’s best digital cameras and modern lenses. In my opinion, vintage glass mounted on a mirrorless digital camera is the best of both worlds.

Japanese garden lantern shot at around f8 – nearly perfect focus of the entire roof
Azalea blossoms shot at about one meter at f4 – soft circular highlights and gorgeous bokeh
Shot at 135mm at f5.6 – here the background is not pleasing as the sky is bright blue and cloudless – see image below
Better – shot at f16-f22
Nice separation and spot on focus of the top of the flagpole – 135mm at f8
Fujifilm X-A10 digital mirrorless camera with Fotodiox M42-FX adapter. The T-mount is changeable and in this case I’ve mounted an M42 screw-in adapter. M42 bodies are typically found on older Yashica, Pentax, Fujica, and many other 35mm SLR cameras.

Let me introduce the star of this post. A wonderful 135mm short telephoto lens made by Sankor for Spiratone. It’s a fast f2.8 lens of a sonnar design with multi-coated surfaces (Tc).

If you own or have been thinking of purchasing a digital mirrorless camera then definitely look into shooting with these classic lenses. I think you’ll find its an interesting diversion from the world of autofocus (and image stabilized) modern lenses. It tends to slow you down and makes you appreciate the photographic process.

Thanks for stopping by and be sure to stop by my shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com – Chris

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2021 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

New Arrivals in my Camera Shop – March 2021

Hi all! I hope everyone is well and staying safe. I’d like to share some of the exciting new items I’ve added in my camera shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com

My shop is hosted by Etsy so most everything in the shop can ship worldwide with a variety of payment options. You can also purchase items direct from me by contacting me at ccphotographyai@gmail.com

Thanks so much for stopping by and if there’s something specifically you’re looking for just drop me a line and I’ll see if I have it.

Thanks for stopping by and be sure to stop by my shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com – Chris

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2021 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

Spiratone (Sankor) Telephoto Lens – 1950s?

Kinda hard to find lens from the late 1950s or maybe even the mid-1960s. This one was mounted on a Miranda SLR so it had an M44 T-mount that I removed.

Although the lens barrel looks like heck the glass is nearly flawless with only a very few dust specs inside. Since I purchased this from a photographer in New Mexico the dry climate has prevented any mold or fungus growth.

I have a T-mount to M42 adapter coming so I can hardly wait to give this little gem a try on my Fujifilm X-A10.

The serial number is No. 51496E which offers a clue as to who made the lens. I believe it was made by Sankor who also made lenses for darn near everybody under at least a dozen brands. If it’s the same maker, Sankor makes a very well respected line of cine lenses.

It’s not the prettiest lens in my collection but after nearly 60 years of use the glass is nearly flawless.
The serial number with the ‘E’ suffix is a clue to the original manufacturer.

Thanks for stopping by and be sure to stop by my shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com – Chris

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2021 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

New in my Camera Shop 2021-2

Hello all! I’ve been super busy these past few weeks gathering some of my camera bits and bobs from my collection to add to my camera shop hosted by Etsy at http://www.ccstudio2380.com

Here’s a small sample of what I have on sale –

I ship nearly worldwide and my items all come from a smoke and pet free home.

Thanks for stopping by and be sure to stop by my shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com – Chris

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2021 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

Nikon’s Gem of a Lens – f/1.4 50mm AI

Nikon Nikkor lenses have been praised since the dawn of time (a slight exaggeration) and in some cases rightly so. This Nikkor lens is right up there in its reputation as a fast quality lens that’s as relevant today as when it was made.

Nikon Nikkor 50mm f/1.4 AI lens made between 1977 to 1981. Don’t confuse this with the later AIS lens which immediately followed this lens.

It takes 52mm filters and caps, has a seven blade aperture, features seven elements in six groups, close focusses to 1.5 feet, and weighs in at 255 grams. It uses the famous Nikon F-mount.

Here I’ve included a nice B+W 52E 010 1X filter for protection. The lens is of course made in Japan.

This lens functions perfectly and the front and rear elements are clean and clear but there is some dust specs inside and some light haze. In my test shots with my Nikon D800 the lens performed well with the imperfections not visible in the final images.

Thanks for stopping by and be sure to stop by my shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com – Chris

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2021 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.