Camera matchmaker – Canon Model 7

A rather odd title for an odd post about cameras. Let me explain. Recently I purchased a rather large collection of camera manuals, user guides, sales brochures and whatnot from a seller in Japan. Mixed in with all the stuff that I wanted and knew about was some surprising finds.

Here are the original warranty-registration papers that would have been included with a Canon Model 7 (or simply the Canon 7) 35mm rangefinder camera that was produced between 1961 and 1964. The paperwork contains the camera and lens serial numbers as they were recorded by the factory.

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A close-up of the registration card (below) shows the body and lens serial numbers.

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Body number 806188 and the lens’ serial number 38115

The Canon 7 was produced in rather large quantities and it was considered a fairly capable camera especially with the 50mm f/1.2 lens attached. An impressive f/0.95 lens was also available. As I understand it, production started at 800001 or 800000 – the camera pictured in the instruction booklet was numbered 800022 (see below).

Canon 7 SN close

So the papers that I have are from an early production model (6,188) which I would guess is from late 1961.

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All of the papers are in excellent vintage condition and show very nicely. Just some slight yellowing with the passage of time.

The Matchmaker Part – If you own this camera or lens – then heck, contact me at ccphotographyai@gmail.com and we’ll get the two of them back together. If you own a Canon 7 and would like to add these papers with your camera or to your collection then head on over to my shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com

Thanks for stopping by! – Chris

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2019 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

Yashica 35 – Yashima’s first 35mm camera!

Yashima Optical Industries Company, Limited (Yashima) released their first 35mm rangefinder camera in April 1958. The camera was in development for at least a year (no proof of that but it seems reasonable to assume that an established TLR camera maker didn’t just pull this camera out of thin air). It could have been developed totally in-house as there is only speculation that Yashima received outside assistance in its development.

Here’s my earliest example of this historic camera. Note that the lens is marked “Yasinon” vice “Yashinon”. Yashima released at least two months of cameras (April and May 1958) with those markings before changing to what we now know as Yashinon.

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My recently acquired Yashica 35 with 60 or more years of dirt! Straight from an online seller in Japan. Note the unfamiliar “Yasinon” lens. These super early examples are rather hard to find since there were only two months of production.

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The good news is that it appears the camera lived most of its life in its leather case so there’s no damage to the surfaces of the body and lens. The bad news about living in a leather case is that it tends to support the growth of mold and fungus on the glass elements of the lens and in the rangefinder.

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The dirt is mostly made up of dust and fibers from the felt lining of the leather case and not soot and finger grime – which is a good thing. Sometimes this type of dirt actually keeps the surfaces protected from metal corrosion as long as it’s been stored in a dry environment.

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What it looked like on the Japanese auction site.

After some initial cleaning of the exterior (see below) with a bunch of Q-tips and some Windex, the camera is looking a whole lot better.

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I use Q-tips and a bit of Windex to gently clean the surfaces of the camera. The Windex leaves no residue and doesn’t harm the leatherette, metal or glass (I’ve safely used that for years). I use the super soft toothbrush to gently clean those hard to reach crevices and to polish the surfaces to a nice sheen.

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Looking sharp but not perfect. If I want a totally clean and usable camera I’ll have to remove the top plate and clean the rangefinder and viewfinder elements. The rangefinder is accurate and focus is easy to obtain but it’s just a little dim inside. If you look closely at the center of the lens you will see the patch of fungus. Unfortunately, that is not cleanable.

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The serial number, No. 843945, decodes to 8 = 1958, 4 = April, 3945 is the production sequence number 3,945 since production began in April.

This is one of the earliest examples of this fine camera having been built sometime in April 1958. Yashima used quality materials and production techniques as the fit and feel of the camera are of a much more expensive camera.

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Earliest sales brochure for the Yashica 35. The serial number of the camera pictured is just a bit earlier than my new camera. Here it’s No. 843002 and mine is No. 843945.

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Same brochure as pictured above. The f1.9 lens model is on the left. The serial number on the lens is No. 18275. Mine is No. 20254.

If you look closely, the lens is described as a Yashinon F1.9 even though the lens says Yasinon. Yashima was in the process of changing over or was it them catching a mistake?

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BTW, 17,000 JPY was about $47 USD in April 1958

By the way, it’s generally believed that these two lenses were made for Yashima by Tomioka Optical. Yashima did have a relationship with Zunow Optical by there’s no proof that these lenses are from Zunow.

Thanks for stopping by! – Chris

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2019 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

Yashica “J” Series of 35mm SLRs – 1960s

In case you missed it, here’s another look at our post about the “J” Series from Yashica.

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The Yashica ‘J’ series of 35mm SLR film cameras. Top body is the J-7, next is the J-4, then the J-5 and finally the first one in the series the J-3. These were heavyweight cameras in their day…the best (for the most part) that Yashica produced from their factory in Nagano Prefecture (Shimosuwa).

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Produced in 1962 to around 1967 to early 1968. The black body J-3 was Yashica’s first 35mm SLR ‘Pro Black’ camera. They were released in the following order… J-3, J-5, J-4 and J-7. These cameras feature lots of brass and glass. They also represent Yashica’s first SLRs with built-in exposure meters. TTL exposure metering was just around the corner for Yashica after the release of the J-7 in the form of the TL Super.

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16358708177_7df772c4d4_o The J-5 was super popular in the mid 1960s.

15954848841_c16d47ab60_o Another tough one in the series to find complete and in mint condition.

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Yashica Dental-Eye III… is it worth another look?

I had this camera briefly and just couldn’t get it to produce the quality images I was hoping for so I passed it on. If you’re interested in purchasing one, do your homework first to make sure it’s the right camera for your needs. I bought mine back in November 2010 and it was gone by December. It’s a handsome camera and mine came complete with its original case and all of the accessories. The model III is a Kyocera-Yashica model.

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The Dental-Eye III is a 35mm SLR with a fixed 100mm f4 macro lens with a built-in ring flash at the end of the lens barrel.

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It’s basically a point and shoot automatic exposure camera – so easy to use even a dentist could use it.

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The ring flash is made up of three separate flashes that operate together. I have seen where one or more of the flashes have stopped working. Ask the seller if they have tested it first.

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The databack can imprint date and time info on the film.

They can be had for not a ton of money – on auction sites they’re all over the map price wise. If you’re interested in one, buy the best condition camera that fits in your budget. Did I mention, do your homework first?

(3-21-2019) Reader Kurt Ingham sent me some pics that he took with his Yashica – I’d say he captured some pretty decent images with his (see below).

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Thanks, Kurt for sharing your pics!

This is a direct quote from the instruction manual.

*Please note – “Normal prints obtained at your photo dealer will have the edges cropped slightly narrower than the actual 35mm frame size. To prevent edges of important photographs from being cropped in this way, allow for some extra area around the periphery of the subject when composing in the viewfinder”.

In my experience, all of the prints came back significantly narrower.  Save the hassle when using this camera and do not get the negatives printed from the lab. Scan the negatives and then crop and print.

Thanks for stopping by! – Chris

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2019 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

Happy SUNday! – Vintage Cameras

Ah yes, I bet almost everyone has seen one or both of these classics at some point in their lives. These were part of an earlier collection we had of vintage Polaroid and Kodak cameras.

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Have a beautiful day y’all!

Thanks for stopping by and be sure to visit our camera store at http://www.ccstudio2380.com

Chris

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2019 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

Canon Photo Gear in the shop – new arrivals!

Select items from my collection of Canon photo gear are now on sale in my online shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com – pop on over and check them out – you may find something that strikes your fancy. Some unique Canon items from the Summer Olympics that were held in Los Angeles in 1984 and even a hard to find 1976 Olympics lens cap from the Olympics held in Montreal.

Happy hunting!

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Thank you!

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Original instructions from 1981

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Instruction book for the A-1 from 1981

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“Action Grip” for the Canon A-1 and AE-1 Program – SOLD! Thank you!

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A rather rare Carl Zeiss Jena Tessar lens with the Exa-Exakta mount – 1952

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Canon fanny pack from the 1984 Olympics

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Canon camera strap still new from 1984

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Getting harder to find – 55mm lens cap commemorating the 1976 Olympics

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Hardly ever seen here in the US – 52mm lens cap

Many more items wait to be discovered in the shop as I continue to sell off my collections of photo stuff. I’ll be listing a mint condition Yashica Mat-124G TLR soon as well as a mint condition Canon New F-1 (F-1N) LA Olympics 35mm SLR! Stay tuned.

Thanks for stopping by! – Chris

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2019 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

 

Some nice Nikon photo gear in my store!

I’ve just added some rather interesting Nikon stuff in my online store at http://www.ccstudio2380.com

It’s a nice way to add some nice Nikon photo gear to your collection.

All three items are now SOLD! Thank you!!!

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In mint condition Nikon waist-level viewfinder/magnifier model DW-3 for the Nikon F3 SLR

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Thank you!

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Thank you!

I’ll be listing a “ton” of other items from my camera and photo gear collection over the next week or so. Stop back often.

Lots of other neat things in the shop so stop on by! Thanks, Chris

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2019 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

Fujifilm Nexia 3100ixZ Special Edition Set

It kinda looks like an early flip phone but it’s a calculator/world “time traveler” thingy. The camera is the Nexia 3100ixZ APS film camera that was released in November 1999 and listed for a shocking ¥45,000 or about $380 in the US. The vintage JAL flight bag was not part of the set and is being used as a prop. Of note about the bag, most of these types of vintage JAL bags had white side panels or were blue with white panels. This is the first one that I’ve seen that’s all red.

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The date time function and calendar go all the way to 2099!

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The Nexia 3100ixZ features a Super EBC Fujinon 23-70mm zoom lens. It takes one CR2 battery (still very available). The calculator takes two standard hearing aid batteries. APS film is no longer produced but it’s available as expired film on eBay and Etsy for a fair price.

APS cameras are a fun way to collect still new in the box film cameras for not a lot of money.

Thanks for stopping by! – Chris

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2019 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

 

A Fun Sized Camera from Fuji Photo

Modern APS (Advanced Photo System) film cameras get no love in today’s world. The film is no longer made (but it’s still readily available) and the cameras seem quaint by 35mm camera standards.

But these late 1990s and early 2000s cameras were and are quite sophisticated. Here’s a rather nice one (it’s actually brand new and never used) from Fuji Photo – the Fujifilm Nexia 250ixZ which was released in July 2001. From what I can tell there were about 16 different Nexia models from Fujifilm that featured a zoom lens and another 8 models with a fixed focal length lens. That’s a bunch of APS cameras produced within a few years of one another.

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At ¥23,000 it listed for just under $200 here in the US. It has a nice bright centered viewfinder.

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The 250ixZ uses one CR123 battery which is still available at a fair price. The APS film cartridge is as easy as it gets – open the compartment and drop it in – no messing with the film itself. The camera has a switch which can adjust the image from a normal shot, wide-angle and a kinda panorama view (C,H,P).

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APS cameras with “MRC” feature the ability for mid-roll film changes which is quite handy. This model includes date/time imprinting.

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It featured a Fujinon Z 23-57.5 mm zoom lens with a somewhat slow f6.7-11 aperture. 5 elements in 5 groups. When the built-in lens cover is slid open the flash pops up and the zoom is activated. It’s small (like all APS cameras) and weighs in at 175 grams.

These APS cameras are available for pennies on the dollar and sometimes still “new in the box” sets become available on Etsy and eBay. If you’re looking for something a bit different in film shooting I highly recommend giving an APS camera a try. Remember that the film is no longer made so anything you buy is expired. How expired and the storage conditions will determine the final look to your pictures.

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The 250ixZ far left, the 3200ixZ in the center and the 4200ixZ on the right. A camera for every budget!

Thanks for stopping by! – Chris

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2019 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.