Chasing a Classic from Yashica – Yashica Flex AS-II

I first spotted this lovely camera on Etsy way back in November 2020. At that time the seller was in a bit of a funk and we couldn’t put a deal together. Now after four short months of watching it sit I made an offer and they accepted. Yeah! Chasing classic cameras is as much of a hunt as it is a waiting game.

This TLR was made by Yashima Kogaku Seiki Company, Ltd. (later Yashica) around November 1954 based on its early serial number.

The selenium cells are located behind the nameplate flap.
Flap in the open position. The cells inside sent a small electric current to the built-in exposure which is mounted on the left side of the camera.
A close-up view of the exposure meter which was made by Sekonic (Seiko Electric Instruments Industry, Company).
The lens on the bottom is called the taking lens and the one on top is the viewing lens. Both lenses were made by Tomioka Optical for Yashima. The shutter was made by Copal and as I mentioned earlier, the exposure meter was made by Sekonic.
A view inside the film chamber shows the serial number – No.31147. The serial number in the first edition of the user’s guide is 30126 and another AS-II that I own is 30302. BTW, there was a roll of unexposed Kodak film inside as a nice bonus.
My first and earliest AS-II showing the lowest serial number found in the wild. Take notice of the “Made in Japan”.

If you would like to know more about Yashica’s earliest days then my good friend Paul Sokk’s site is the place you want to go – you can find Paul’s site at http://www.yashicatlr.com

Back to the chase. I wanted this AS-II but the seller didn’t offer much information about its overall condition or whether it even worked. It was listed with the complete contents of an old leather camera case so there were lots of goodies inside along with the camera. Sometimes you’ve got to follow your instincts and go for it. A lack of info can add some excitement to the chase! The camera also had it’s original case which was sort of welded to the camera. The case even left some of its green crud behind as you may be able to see on the exposure meter housing.

Bonus! A roll of unexposed Kodak Verichrome Pan (VP-120) film inside.

Comments are always welcomed as I’ve learned quite a bit from reader feedback. As always, thanks for stopping by and while you’re at it, feel free to visit my camera shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com (CC Design Studios hosted by Etsy). – Chris Whelan

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris, Chasing Classic Cameras with Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2021 Chasing Classic Cameras with Chris (Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic), Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

1950s Kodak Verichrome Safety Film

Kodak Verichrome Safety Film was produced between 1931-1956 when it was replaced by Verichrome Pan. It’s a orthochromatic black and white negative film. This rather rare unopened “Duo-Pak” expired in January 1957 which means it was probably made around two years prior.

Verichrome was made in 116, 120, 616, and 620 formats.

Thanks for stopping by and be sure to stop by my shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com – Chris

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2021 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

Happy SUNday – days long gone

Happy SUNday everyone! I hope your day goes well and it’s sunny and warm.

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Cocoa Beach F.D. – Me and my favorite truck 1972. Taken with a Yashica TL Electro X on Kodak Ektachrome.

While attending college at nearby Hydrospace Technical Institute (H.T.I.) which was the oceanographic tech school of the Florida Institute of Technology (F.I.T.) I was able to train as a volunteer firefighter with the Cocoa Beach Fire Department, Florida. It was an extremely enjoyable time in my life – 18 years old, SCUBA diving and surfing almost every day and studying a subject I was interested in. I appreciated the time the professional firefighters took to train us and I think they enjoyed the interaction with those hippie boys from school. By the way, the locals referred to H.T.I. as the “Hippie Training Institute”.

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Yashica TL Electro X on Kodak Plus X Pan.

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Cocoa Beach P.D. and F.D. hanging out.

Thanks for stopping by and enjoy your day! – Chris

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2020 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

 

Kodak Brownie Holiday Flash Outfit – 1956

From Kodak around 1956, this is a Brownie Holiday Flash 127 roll film camera set. Still with its original box and still fully functional. The set comes with flashbulbs, the detachable flash unit, strap, and the Midget Flashguard (vinyl shield) for the flash.

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Made in the USA from rugged Bakelite and designed to last a lifetime.

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The flash takes (2) AA batteries and standard flashbulbs.

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The camera uses 127 roll film which is still being manufactured and of course, is still processed via online labs (and via home processing). 120 roll film can also be used if you modify the film roll to fit. 127 format produces 4 x 6.4 cm negatives (1 5/8 x 2 1/4 inch).

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The original box. I acquired this set from the original owner and his name “Bobby” is printed on the top center of the box (in red). He’s had it new since Christmas 1956.

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I’ve tested everything but the flash (I didn’t want to waste a bulb) and the winder, the shutter operate properly. The direct-view viewfinder is clear and bright – I do see some dust and a few fingers of fungus on the lens but I believe it’s still capable of delivering nice vintage images.

If you haven’t used a brownie before they’re a blast to use and the 127 format produces a nice image that’s easy to scan.

It’s available in my online camera shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com which is hosted by Etsy. I can ship it virtually worldwide and accept a variety of payments.

Thanks for stopping by and be sure to visit my shop as I’ve added many new items from my collection and have some exciting new finds to list shortly. – Chris

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2020 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

Whiteface Mt., New York – 1967

Me on top of New York! Well, almost.

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On top of Whiteface Mountain, Wilmington, N.Y. near Lake Placid.

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The original image on Kodak Kodacolor Instamatic film. The square pics of my youth.

Whiteface Mountain hosted the alpine portion of the Winter Olympics in 1932 and 1980.

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At Whiteface Mountain in 1960 – mom’s got a good hold on me with no seat straps. 

Thanks for stopping by! – Chris

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2018 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

Times Square NYC – 1996

How quickly things change in Times Square. 1996 looks like eons ago… wait, it was eons ago!

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Not the best of scans. Canon EOS Rebel 2000 on Kodak Kodacolor film. NYC – May 1996

Chris

Please respect that all content, including photos and text are property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2017 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

Florence… 1986

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Nothing says Florence like the Cathedral of Florence. Canon F-1 with FD 24mm f/2.8 lens on Kodak Kodachrome 25.

In presenting a short series of images of Florence (one of the most beautiful of all cities in Italy), it’s a tough call on which images to include. In Pisa, it has to be the most famous bell tower in the world. I imagine for Rome I would choose the Coliseum – Colosseum or the Vatican. Since there’s so much beauty, history, art and architecture at every turn in Florence it’s nearly impossible to choose the one to use first. My visit to the Tuscony Region was in late October 1986 – the weather was perfect and the visibility was awesome!

My camera was the Canon F-1 (1978 version) with three lenses to use: FD 24mm f/2.8, FD 80-200mm f/4 zoom and the normal FD 55mm f/1.4. Since sunlight would be in abundance, Kodak’s Kodachrome 25 fit perfectly with the days shooting plan (no interiors in the plans).

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Vista view to the north… FD 24mm while hanging the camera over the side of the railing (wobbly pieces of metal) loosely attached to 600 year old stone.

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The Duomo with its instantly identifiable tiled dome. FD 80-200mm at about 150mm

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FD 200mm braced on the railing.

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Back to earth… Canon FD 24mm wide angle lens at f/22

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More FD 24mm… my go to lens in the tight quarters of a city. It’s not easy to get all three in the same image.

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The Canon’s light meter (spot) handled this tricky exposure well. Yep, FD 24mm lens.

Of course what would a visit to any city be without the required “People and Pigeon” shot.

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Happy people and happy pigeons.

This of course is only a very small sample of what’s available in and around Florence and the Tuscany Region. I had only one short afternoon to visit so I was lucky to see as much as I did. The old “someday” I hope to travel back and do it right.

Thanks for your visit!

Chris