Classic Mamiya M645 – a medium format SLR from 1975

Who hasn’t seen a professional photographer with a Mamiya M645? They were the go-to camera systems for weddings, school photos, and just about any type of photography that benefited from its 6×4.5cm format. I’ll admit, the camera did best on a tripod in a studio but with a steady hand and fast film, it did well on walkabouts.

Here is mine from a recent purchase from the original owner’s estate. Mr. Ken Cobean was a well-known writer and photographer from New Mexico back when it was still part of the old west. Ken’s works were published in magazines such as Time and Life and Ken received two prestigious awards for his photography during the 1964 New York World’s Fair.

Here’s Ken’s Mamiya M645 from 1975.

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It’s a beautifully maintained camera from Ken’s collection of portrait and press photography and it’s available in my camera shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com

Thanks for stopping by! – Chris

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2020 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

Friday Fotos! – Mamiya M645

The Mamiya M645 – a classic from 1975.

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Mamiya M645 – 15 exposures on 120 roll film.

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Medium format film camera with Mamiya-Sekor C f/4 150mm portrait lens.

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Prism finder mounted in lieu of the standard waist-level finder. No built-in exposure meter.

Thanks for stopping by and have a great day (be safe y’all!). – Chris

Be sure to visit my camera shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com for some truly unique cameras and photographic accessories.

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2020 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

 

Vintage Japanese Leather Camera Cases

Here’s a small sample of some pretty rare (or at least super hard to find) leather cases from the late 1930s to the mid-1950s.

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Coolest camera logo ever! Pluto 7

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From Konishiroku (later became Konica) Semi-Pearl 4.5x6cm folding medium format 120 roll film camera – ca. 1938

The Semi-Pearl was the first camera made in late 1938. As I understand, there were other models made during the war, and after that became somewhat popular. Still, finding a leather case from the thirties is super rare as most have fallen apart.

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Konishiroku Konilette (later became Konica) 35mm compact film camera – ca. 1953

This Konilette used a 35mm film without sprocket holes so the image was just a tad larger than a traditional 35mm image size.

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Shichiyo Kogaku of Tokyo Pluto Six P medium format folding 120 roll film camera – ca. 1955

As I understand it, there were only two camera models made by Shichiyo – the Pluto Six P and the Pluto Six L. The cameras are super rare so finding an intact leather case after all these years is hyper rare. The “Pluto 7” logo derives from the Japanese word for seven – shichi which is part of the company name and is considered good luck.

These are currently available in my online (Etsy) camera shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com

If you have one (or all) of these cameras then you’ll appreciate just how rare it is to find the cases in excellent condition. Thanks for stopping by and have a wonderful weekend! – Chris

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2020 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

Yashica 635 – shoot 6×6 cm and 35 mm all in one TLR

Back in 1958 (May-June) Yashica released or introduced the inventive model 635 twin-lens reflex (TLR) camera to the export markets. It would be a short while before the camera would make its debut in Japan.

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The only film it couldn’t shoot was movie film!

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This one is from one of the first batches of cameras made in June 1958. Its serial number puts it at the 231st made.  It was purchased new by the original owner at the RAF Changi base in Singapore.

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Close-up view of the 35 mm conversion kit that originally came with the camera.

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A general idea of how to install the 35 mm film cartridge and kit.

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A gem from 1958.

As Carol and I continue to downsize our camera collection we’ve made this camera and kit available in our online camera shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com

If you’re looking to get into medium-format film photography and still want to use 35 mm film to make color transparencies (slides) this is a perfect combo camera to invest in.

Thanks for stopping by and feel free to hit us with an offer if you’re so inclined. Chris & Carol

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2020 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

Happy SUNday! – Minolta Six

Minolta’s first 6×6 medium-format camera. The body is made almost entirely from Bakelite. 1936

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Minolta Six top

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It’s kinda hard to find a pre-war Minolta especially one that has a working shutter. What a lovely picture machine from another era. It’s available in my camera shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com

Have a beautiful day and as always, thanks for stopping by! – Chris

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2020 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

wordless wednesday

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Camera: Fujicaflex Automat (1954) by Fuji Photo Film Company

Thanks for stopping by! – Chris

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2020 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

The Fujicaflex Automat- a monster TLR from Fuji Photo Film Company, Tokyo

Here’s another look at this wonderful camera. I’ve recently found the time to shoot a roll of film with it and the film will be developed soon. I’ll be sure to post the scans when I can.

Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic

Fuji’s only attempt at a twin-lens reflex camera – 1954

DSCF8012 logoThe Fuji Photo Film Company of Tokyo has a long history of making some very desirable cameras – from simple point and shoot models to high-quality professional medium format film cameras covering most types of film formats (Fuji Photo, after all, is in the business of selling film). Along the way, there have been a few cameras that have stood out for their technical achievements and innovations and one of them is the Fujicaflex Automat (for much more about this model please check out Mr. Koyasu’s wonderful site).

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We’ve wanted to add this camera to our collection for many years and the right combination of events led us to this one. It was for sale in Japan a short while back and we missed it – it became available again from a collector in Thailand so we went for it.

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Fujica GW690 Professional – medium format photography on a grand scale

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The Fujica GW690 Professional from Fuji Photo Film Company – November 1978. It’s a rather hefty medium format 120/220 roll film camera capable of producing images at an amazingly large 6 x 9 cm.

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Loaded with Fujifilm Neopan 100 Acros.

Its original list price was ¥143,500. The camera features a non-interchangeable EBC Fujinon 90mm f/3.5 lens (5 elements in 5 groups) and a Seiko #0 leaf shutter with settings for T, 1-1/500 second. It weighs “just” 1,430 grams. No batteries needed as there is no built-in exposure meter. Simply focus the easy to use rangefinder, meter via a handheld meter (or phone app), set your aperture and shutter speed and you’re good to go. By the way, this beast produces 8 super sharp images so you can eat through a roll of 120 film in a hurry.

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Original sales brochure – 1978.

●11FUJI GW690ⅡGOLD

Released in 1985, the now Fuji GW690II in GOLD.

To see all of the cameras in this series please check out this wonderful site.

Images were taken with my Fujica. All of the images are as exposed and as scanned. No post-production, really-really.

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The Fujica GW690 and Fujifilm Neopan 100 Acros are an almost perfect combination. There’s always plenty of these available via online auctions with a majority of them listed in Japan.

GOOD NEWS!

Fujifilm Acros II

Fujifilm Acros II Box

Yeah! Neopan is not dead!

Thanks for stopping by! – Chris

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2019 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

 

Yashima Flex Box – revisited

As a die-hard collector of Yashica cameras and photo gear, I can’t pass up the opportunity to share interesting bits that represent Yashica’s history. Of course, Yashica started off as Yashima and this represents the only camera that bore the Yashima name. Subsequent cameras quickly were named Yashica while the company name remained Yashima (until 1958).

So the Yashima Flex is pretty unique as it is a one-off. Here’s a pretty rare find – an original box for the Yashima Flex from 1953. The box structurally is sound and the graphics are clear and still appealing. There is some embedded soil that stained the paper on the top of the box but that’s to be expected as the top receives the most fallout from pollutants.

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This is spot on to the actual color of the box (faded I’m sure after all these years).

These boxes are often called presentation boxes as they were inside of an outer cardboard shipping box. As best as I can tell, the boxes were never intended to be a place to store your camera when not in use so most were disposed of as soon as the camera was used. There’s no reason not to store your camera in its leather case in the box other than it wasn’t very convenient to do so. Finding an intact box for a camera made in Japan sixty-five years ago is pretty amazing especially considering that there weren’t many made.

Yashima was a startup just like hundreds of others in post-war Japan. How their boxes looked in a dealers display mattered so these early 1950s boxes often were made extremely well. To give an idea of its size here are its dimensions. About 7 inches tall, 5 inches wide and 4.25 inches deep ( 170 x 124 x 110mm).

Yashima Flex Box Set (1) with logo

Yashima’s pride and joy! Not quite as good a representation of the actual color of the box compared to pictures earlier in this post.

Thanks for stopping by! Chris