Yashica 44 LM – 1960

Yashica’s “pint sized” twin-lens reflex 127 film camera from 1960. Instead of producing typical 6x6cm negatives from a full sized TLR on 120 film, the Yashica 44 LM produces negatives and slides in the 4x4cm format from 127 film. A smaller negative means a slightly smaller camera. This model comes with a built-in selenium photo cell light meter (also known as an exposure meter). It reads reflected light from the subject – no batteries needed! After 57 years, this camera’s meter works just fine and is accurate too!

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Anyone who follows our blog on a regular basis knows that we’re a pushover when it comes to a pretty Yashica and if it’s in its original box – well so much the better. Fujifilm FinePix S9900W.

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The boxes normally don’t hold up this well after nearly 6 decades – this one has been stored properly and looks pretty close to new. The colors are bright and the box is solid. The studio camera for this shot was my Fujifilm FinePix S9900W.

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The star of the blog! The Yashica 44 LM from 1960. Mint new and in unused condition. Everything works just fine. The light meter is spot on and the shutter is accurate, The lenses are clean, clear and sharp. This shot was with our new Samsung Galaxy S8+ camera.

This camera is finished in dark gray on the metalwork and that contrasts nicely with the dove gray leatherette of the body.

Thanks for stopping by!

Be sure to check out our online store at https://www.ccstudio2380.com for some great Christmas gifts and stocking stuffers!

Some of our fine art images can also be found at https://society6.com/ccstudio2380

Our gallery can also be found at https://500px.com/yashicachris

Please respect that all content, including photos and text are property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2017 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

Yashima Flex – 1954

Yashica’s first twin-lens reflex (TLR) camera to bear the company name – Yashica was Yashima at its founding. The Yashica name wasn’t adopted for the company until 1958.

This Yashima Flex is as close to its original condition as one could hope for. It’s fully functional and a joy to use.

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A beauty from the craftspeople at Yashima – Nagano Prefecture, Japan.

Thanks for stopping by! If you’re interested in purchasing classic cameras, please visit our e-commerce store at https://www.ccstudio2380.com

You can visit our gallery of photographs at https://500px.com/yashicachris

Some of our art prints can be found at https://society6.com/ccstudio2380

We’re also active buyers of classic photogear – contact us at chriscarol@ccstudio2380.com

Chris

Please respect that all content, including photos and text are property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2017 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

Fujicaflex Automat – Fuji Photo Film’s 1st TLR – 1954

Vintage camera wish list item 101.

The Fuji Photo Film Co., Ltd., Fujicaflex 

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Designed to incorporate the best features that were available in the medium format twin-lens reflex camera market, the Fujicaflex debuted in 1954 – at a very premium price, we might add. While surfing today, we stumbled upon this wonderful site from Fujifilm Europe. You can check it out here

It’s nice to see a large corporation like Fujifilm blog about some of the really cool cameras that helped make their company great. In another blog, they go on to talk about the amazing Fujipet from 1957.

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For more about this wonderful camera, take a trip here too to see Mr. Yoshinobu Koyasu’s camera collection… it is not to be missed!

It’s certainly interesting to read (Fujifilm Europe’s blog) – the older posts that pay tribute to the cameras of their roots are so interesting.

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My Fujicaflex acquired in 2018 from a collector in Thailand. Finally!

Thanks for stopping by! – Chris

Please stop by my camera shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com

 

Yashica Flex AS-II by Yashima Optical

One of the original group of 6 cameras that Yashica (Yashima Optical Industries Company, Ltd.) made in the early to mid 1950s. This AS-II was introduced in 1954 and featured a built-in (well, attached) light meter. They’re solid cameras these early Yashica TLRs, and in our opinion, had some underrated features as well as great lenses. The light meter was made by Sekonic by the way.

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Yashica Flex AS-II with built-in light meter (just visible on the camera’s left side). The light meter’s cells were located under the nameplate and were exposed by lifting up the nameplate flap.

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The AS-II featured Yashimar lenses that were made by Tomioka Optical for Yashica. A Copal shutter with a blazing fast 1/200 top speed!

If you’re in the market for a vintage Yashica TLR then the AS-II should be on your list. Be advised that most will not have a working light meter – if you get one with one it’s a bonus. They are a bit hard to find – 63 year old cameras don’t often look this good or work perfectly. We were lucky as we were able to purchase this one from a collector in the US for a reasonable price.

Taken on the US Post Office steps in downtown Fernandina Beach, Florida. The post office dates to 1911.

Camera: Samsung Galaxy S4

Chris

Yashica EM TLR test roll – 2011

Some recently found images from a roll of Kodak E100VS Ektachrome Professional color slide film taken with my Yashica EM. Shot and processed around 2011 or so. Scanned (today) with my Canon CanoScan 9000F Mark II scanner.

I normally shoot Fujicolor PRO400H color negative film and Acros 100 black & white… I can see why. I wasn’t happy with these images when I first saw them and that’s why I probably just chucked them in a drawer.

My post production (no PS or LR) after the scans helped some but the color was way off. In fairness, it could have been the processing as I used a basic online company vice ‘The Darkroom’.

The transparencies weren’t cut properly by the lab so some of the square images are not square. I don’t crop my 6x6cm images after scanning as they’re meant to be square (adds to the composition challenge in the viewing hood).

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Amelia Island’s courthouse.

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Clock Tower

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My father-in-laws motor home.

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Front yard river birch planted from a 1 gallon pot 15 years ago.

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Backyard dry streambed with maidenhair ferns.

All of the images were exposed using the Yashica’s exposure meter. Since slide film has a narrow exposure latitude, it was a good test of the Yashica’s nearly 50 year old built-in meter.

Yashica-Mat 120 Film Camera Set – 1960

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Pretty close to the way it looked when it was unboxed back in 1960. This one was part of a short production run of only a handful of cameras. It was for sale at US Military Exchanges (stores) in Japan as it is marked *EP* which meant an exempt purchase. No taxes paid but it could not be purchased or sold on the Japanese domestic market.

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It was Yashica’s first crank film advance TLR and it also featured auto cocking of the shutter. First released in April 1957.

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The quality of the images taken with a Yashica-Mat are outstanding – Yashica used high-quality Yashinon f/ 3.5 80mm lenses made for them by Tomioka Optical of Tokyo.

They are a joy to use and it’s a great camera to get into medium format photography with. It produces large 6 x 6 cm negatives or slides.

Thanks for your visit! Please visit our camera shop for some interesting vintage photo gear at http://www.ccstudio2380.com

Chris and Carol  ^.^

Yashima-Yashica Leather

A misleading title? We’re not sure. It’s doubtful that in Yashima’s early days of camera manufacturing, that they made their own leather case goods. They had plenty on their plate already – lens production (mostly testing), machining parts, pouring cast aluminum bodies, stamping out metal pieces and of course, putting it all together in a box and shipping it off to various Trading Companies and camera dealers around Japan and the world. Oh did we mention, inventing new camera designs too.

We believe that Yashima-Yashica had their leather case goods made by at least 4 different suppliers – each with their own maker’s marks stamped on the bottom of the case.

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Could the trademark be ‘Tomioka Kogaku’? In the early days of Yashima/Yashica, did they use leather cases made by outside companies? More than likely since they would not have had the facilities or skills to produce quality leather products in large quantities IMO.

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This image is of the bottom of our Yashicaflex Rookie’s leather camera case. Some of the 1950s era Yashima-Yashica cases have similar marks. With an occasional exception, most 1960s era cases do not carry these marks.

The mystery… we believe that these are ‘maker’s marks’ or trademarks of the company that manufactured the case for Yashima-Yashica. The marks are similar to marks found on Japanese tin toys from the same period. Our theory is that Yashica did not have the facilities or skills to make leather cases on their own in the early days of production and that outside leather crafters added their individual trademarks to the cases.

Other marks that we’ve seen… T.K , NT , GSS and another K.K but in a diamond shaped box.

If you know of the origins of these type of marks on Japanese leather goods please add your comments. We would love to know for sure.

Thanks… C&C ^.^

 

 

 

1957 Yashica-C

The Yashica-C made by Yashima, was part of the new wave of Yashicas that were released in late 1956 for sale in the world markets (focus scale is only in feet). It was listed at $46.50 plus $8.00 for the “De Luxe Leather Eveready Case”. The other models released at the same time were the Yashica-A ($29.95) and the Yashica LM ($59.95) which featured a built-in exposure meter!

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This handsome camera came to us recently with all features fully working – even after six decades of use, no issues. Our guess would be this camera saw maybe 1 or 2 rolls of film in its life. It is in factory new condition.

Features: Semi-automatic film wind, 80mm Yashikor f: 3.5 taking and viewing lenses (hard coated and color corrected), Copal shutter with speeds at 1, 1/2, 1/5, 1/10, 1/25, 1/50, 1/100, 1/300 second and Bulb, self-timer, flash sync (M-x) built-in, bayonet lens mount and flash gun shoe with standard PC flash terminal.

If you’re looking to try medium format photography, the Yashica-C is a great camera and a great value. It can often be had for significantly less money then a Yashica-D.

A word of caution about 6 decade old TLRs. Corrosion of the black metal parts is common as is fungus and mold in and on the lenses. If the camera you’re interested in shows some exterior rust (and other forms of corrosion), then ask the seller a bunch of questions. Cameras like these that come from humid environments are often left in their organic leather cases (and in the dark) – fertile grounds for growing mold and fungus. Fungus filaments can completely destroy a lens or at the very least, etch parts of the coating for good.

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All the goodies!

On a more happy note – this beauty has no mold or fungus and was purchased from a seller in Michigan. Probably a one owner camera – it came with a roll of Kodak Tri-X film loaded inside (at least from the mid 1960s).

Studio Camera: Fujifilm FinePix S9900W

Thanks for your visit and comments are always welcome. C&C ^.^