Elvis Stamps – issued by the US Postal Service in 1993

I’m not a collector of stamps but most anyone can appreciate a little Elvis to brighten one’s day. I have this small sheet of 29 cent Elvis stamps issued by the US Postal Service commemorating the life of “The King”. They are in mint new condition and haven’t been used. Makes a great gift for yourself or a fan. They’ll be mailed flat and secure and sent via USPS Priority Mail for free!

They are also available in our shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com

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Genuine US Postal Service Issued Elvis Stamps – Gem Mint Condition

As issued by the US Postal Service in 1993. This colorful Elvis Presley stamp set would make a beautiful addition to any collection. Perfect for even the casual fan. You'll get all 10 stamps in perfect mint new condition. I'll even mail them FOR FREE in the USA via USPS Priority Mail with tracking info and insurance! Pay securely via PayPal.

$19.00

 

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Not your typical Tahoe – 1983 U.S. Navy SEABEE Utility Vehicle

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On display at the Fernandina Beach Municipal Airport courtesy of the American Military Historical Society.

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And then there’s this –

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And this –

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For more from this event check out my post here.

Pretty cool stuff! Thanks for stopping by! Be sure to stop by my camera shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com

Chris

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2019 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

1984 AM General M35 Troop Carrier

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One of the more recognizable trucks in the US Army, this 2 1/2-ton “medium duty” truck has 10 wheels and is a 6×6 – the A2 version is powered by a 7.8 liter 6-cylinder turbocharged multifuel engine.

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This truck was part of a large display of vintage military vehicles that were at the Fernandina Beach Municipal Airport during the 24th Annual Concours d’Elegance weekend which was held separately at The Ritz-Carlton, Amelia Island.

Camera: Samsung Galaxy S8+

Thanks for stopping by! – Chris

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2019 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

 

1968 Kaiser Jeep US Army Ambulance

This weekend the 24th Annual Amelia Island Concours d’Elegance came to a conclusion. There are so many events going on during our “March Motor Madness” it’s hard to keep up with all of the activity. One event, in particular, was held at the Fernandina Beach Municipal Airport and consisted of a display of about ten vintage US military vehicles all in operating condition and plated for use on the road.

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From Ft. Benning, Georgia

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Very nicely restored in period trim from the Vietnam era.

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The truck is in great mechanical condition an operates on the roads here in Florida.

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What looks to be an accurate set-up for a field ambulance.

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If you’re interested in anything to do with classic cars then Amelia Island is the place to be during that 2nd week in March. Be sure to check out the 25th Concours for next year!

Thanks for stopping by and be sure to stop by my camera shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com for some classic and hard to find vintage cameras and photo gear! – Chris

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2019 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

F4U Corsair Model at the Fernandina Beach Airport Terminal

I finally got the chance to check out the Corsair reproduction that hangs in the airport terminal building here on Amelia Island. The terminal was completed late in 2018 and represents a significant upgrade to the facilities that it replaced. Well done to all involved!

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The Corsair was flown by the US Navy and Marines in the Pacific theater of operations during the latter stages of WWII and enjoyed a reputation that was second to none.

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The Corsair was powered by a super powerful Pratt & Whitney engine.

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The main lobby before the addition of the Corsair.

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The terminal building is designed to evoke a WWII F4U Corsair fighter-bomber.

Thanks for stopping by and if you find yourself anywhere near northeast Florida make time to stop and visit our unique airport terminal.

My camera shop is always open and always filled with some classic cameras and gear. You can find my shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com

Camera: Samsung Galaxy S8+

Chris

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2019 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

Jacksonville’s Airport – 1947

I believe this image is from around 1947 – I’m not positive about the exact date but there are many signs that it’s at least the late 1940s. Eastern Air Lines operated DC-3’s until about 1953.

This picture was taken at a local Jacksonville hotel which had on display a series of historical photos of J’ville back in the day. The image is of an Eastern DC-3 parked on the ramp in front of the Imeson Control Tower at the Jacksonville Imeson Airport.

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This colorized postcard was made from that image and was a well-known postcard of the day depicting Jacksonville. I believe the title on the card is wrong as the airport was not known as the Jacksonville Municipal Airport post World War II.

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Make note of the Sailor walking towards the building (lower left) – a common site around the airport as Jacksonville is a “Navy Town”.

Thanks for stopping by! Be sure to stop by my camera shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com – Chris

1822 U.S. Silver Half Dollar

Occasionally we run across a silver 50 cent piece with a hole punched through the top near the edge. Most collectors turn their noses up to collecting these coins as they are considered damaged. We consider them to be desirable little time machines. Here’s why.

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1822 Capped Bust Half Dollar – 13 Stars

First off, these coins were hand struck at the Philadelphia Mint. Hand struck means that a Mint worker (usually women) would load the silver planchet into the die and then turn a wheel that would strike the dies together producing the coin you see above. This totally manual process produced coins that for the most part, were never exactly the same.

What makes holed coins interesting to us (and many others) is that they were holed for a very important purpose – they’d be worn like a necklace and kept hidden from view. In the 1820s, fifty cents in silver could buy some much-needed supplies in an emergency and see the bearer through some desperate times. Furthermore, a coin or coins strung around the neck were less likely to be lost through a hole in a pocket (if they even had pockets).

If you look closely at the hole you can see some bits of fabric (or leather) and dirt in it. Another neat part of the coin is that when the hole was punched it displaced the rim just a bit as the silver deformed (top edge). The coin is well worn on the obverse (the date side) but in the recessed areas, there’s still a trace of the original mint toning which shows as a faint bluish-purple color. Miss Liberty has lost the details of her gown and her bust blends with her clothing. Her cap still shows a strong “Liberty” and there are still some separate strands of her hair and curls showing.  One star (upper right) has its center points still visible.

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1822 Capped Bust Half Dollar Reverse

Here on the reverse of the coin things get interesting. Look closely at the hole – the flattened area around the hole shows that it was punched through and then flattened. This shows that it was punched and not drilled. This side of the coin is more worn than the front which indicates that it rubbed against the clothes or chest of the wearer. There’s still a trace of the colorful toning here and there on the coins surfaces.

These coins were minted between 1807-1839 and contain 90% silver and have a diameter of 32.5mm and weighed (when new) 13.48g. The 1822 coin had a reported mintage of 1,559,000 coins which when you think about the size of the country at that time is quite a few coins for circulation.

Some history of this coin series: Partway through 1807, the Draped Bust series was replaced by U.S. Mint Engraver John Reich’s Capped Bust design. This series shows Liberty donning a cloth cap on her head. The reverse once again displays a smaller eagle, with a shield. Until 1836, the edge featured the denomination, once again inscribed as FIFTY CENTS OR HALF A DOLLAR. Partway through 1836, the coin’s edge was changed to a simpler reeded style. This style remained until the end of the Capped Bust series in 1839.

Another reason that we like these holed coins is that you can only imagine who might have worn it back in the 1820s, 1830s and beyond. Where did this coin travel? Was it around a soldier’s neck during the Civil War? How about in the wild frontier of a pioneer? The possibilities are endless.

Current silver melt value for this coin is less than $7 – numismatically it’s worth way more to a collector but with limitations. We’ve known collectors that collect only holed 50 cent pieces since he found them much more interesting than pristine, mint state coins of the same period (and way more affordable too!).

For more about our coinage, you can visit here.

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Thanks for your visit and go check out some of our countries early coinage. You may find that collecting a few early examples is a great way to own a bit of our history. These coins (even those with no holes) are actually quite affordable in circulated condition.

Chris

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2018 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

 

US 17 Florida – Riverside Motel

The last strip of highway heading north towards Georgia. Up ahead the St. Marys River and bridge – heat radiates off the already hot pavement as a reminder that it’s only Spring – wait ’til Summer.

United States Highway 17 was the life giving link to the Eastern Seaboard and beyond. If you came to Florida in the 1940s, 1950s and early 1960s you crossed that bridge (well one like it but it was a drawbridge then but it’s not anymore even though the sign says it is, whew!) and your first glimpse of the Sunshine State was this patch of pavement. I-95 didn’t exist and it was 17 or nothing in those days. Now it’s only travelled by locals, log trucks or tourists looking for the original Florida. Along this stretch, cheap but nice motels with air conditioning and swimming pools beckoned those travellers that wanted their first taste of Florida and a cool bed. If you were real lucky, you’d spot a gator or two in the wet areas just off the the road.

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Distance wise, this is Florida’s first motel – just a half mile from the Georgia line. It closed decades ago, driven out by high speed travel on smooth highways. The doors were closed and locked once – now termites and rot have opened them again. Couples would snuggle together in these rooms while on their honeymoon. Children would run wild through the parking lot waiting for the car ride that would take them to Florida’s first attractions still well south. Now only grass and weeds run wild.

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Air conditioned – and just down the road souvenirs, film, food , whiskey and ice cream. Too far north for oranges. Just right for cold beer.

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I like coming here… it’s quiet except for the occasional log truck along the highway heading south to the mills and of course the stray local or curious tourist. Not like it used to be – a steady stream of cars spilling across that bridge into the sunshine.

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Yep, no trespassing. Trespassers will be stung or bitten – wasps and fire ants do the enforcing. No tourists – just bugs, heat and photographers.

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Be sure to get off I-95 at Exit 3 in South Georgia and head west on Georgia 40 to US 17 in Kingsland (just a few miles away). Turn south on US 17 (left) and in a little bit you’ll cross that all too narrow bridge over the St. Marys River and you’ll be in Florida. Just a half mile south on your left you’ll find that first motel in Florida pictured above. Oh there’s no plaque or marker telling you about the history of this place, and that’s a shame. It was part of the gateway to the “New South” and it deserves recognition. It is for sale though! ^.^

Camera: Fujifilm FinePix S9900W

Thanks for your visit! Be sure to watch out for the fire ants!

Chris