The advantages of being a self-diagnosed hypochondriac during a pandemic…

None that I can think of at the moment. Here’s a funny post that describes me to a tee… well, almost.

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Stay at home and self-quarantine – that’s a normal day for me. Wash your hands frequently – how many times beyond fifty a day is considered excessive?

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Isolation can be a desperate time for many – call friends frequently and check on the family.

All kidding aside, please take care of yourselves and remember to check frequently on family and friends – during stressful times like this, a person’s mental wellness is important too.

Have a wonderful day and stay safe! – Chris

Friday Fotos! – Florida “Whine”

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Today’s high temperature. At least the sun is out but it’s also very windy. Better days ahead.

Thanks for stopping by for a bit of my Florida “whine”. – Chris

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2020 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

New In the Shop – 10.17.19

Lots of new items in the shop this week and some old favorites. As always, my camera shop can be found 24/7 at http://www.ccstudio2380.com

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My shop can be found at http://www.ccstudio2380.com and if there’s something specific that you’re looking for let me know what it is by dropping me a line at ccphotographyai@gmail.com

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Everything is on sale at 10% off plus there’s free shipping on some items too! Most everything that’s in my shop is kinda rare and in mint new condition. Check back often as I continue to add cameras and gear from my personal collection.

Thanks, Chris

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2019 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

Hurricane Dorian – Sep 4, 2019

Here’s the lastest snip of the hurricane as seen on enhanced radar. The eye is quite large and the eyewall has maintained its ragged appearance since yesterday. The central pressure is up to 964 mb and the sustained winds are down a bit. The eye will past well east of our island but I’m afraid that we’ll catch the outer squalls from the storm… soon.

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Radar view as of 9 AM this morning. The western edge of the strongest convection and winds are now just about 30 or so miles east of Amelia Island. It’s going to be a close brush with the squalls associated with the outer edge of the storm (the yellow and red areas).

I thought I would post a bit earlier today since there’s a real possibility that we may lose power within the next couple of hours. The last time we lost power was for 61 hours with the passage of Hurricane Irma well west of us in 2017. Hopefully nothing like that this time.

You can see my post from yesterday here.

Chris

Hurricane Dorian – Sep 3, 2019

An update on Hurricane Dorian as of 11 AM

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Radar image from Nassau, Bahamas as of 11 AM Tuesday, September 3rd.

Some changes noted since 11 AM yesterday. The eye has expanded but has become a bit ragged as dry air from over Florida has disrupted the appearance of the western eyewall. The precipitation areas have expanded northward and of course, the southern edge of the eye is now north of Grand Bahama Island (barely). The hurricane has also weakened quite a bit from 24 hours ago with the central pressure now at 955 mb up from a low of 910 mb at the height of the storm’s intensity.

Compared to yesterday’s scan of the radar (see below) the changes are obvious.

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From the NWS National Hurricane Center the 11 AM prediction of the track of Dorian.

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Today as of 11 AM

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Yesterday as of 11 AM

Things are looking better for the east coast of Florida as the accuracy of the short term forecast track improves with time. Hoping for the best but always prepared for the worst.

You can view my post about Dorian from yesterday here.

Chris

Amazing hurricane – but not in a good way!

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Radar image out of Nassau, Bahamas at approximately 11 AM Sep 2. The eye of Hurricane Dorian continues to spin just over the central coast of Grand Bahama Island.

I’ve been a professional meteorologist since 1975 and while in the US Navy serving on various ships over twenty-two years I’ve encountered my share of strong hurricanes and typhoons. I’ve tracked and made forecasts for hundreds of tropical systems and have seen first hand just how powerful they are and the destruction they cause. I’ve experienced a few hurricanes that have gone stationary before but this one, Hurricane Dorian is amazing to me for just how long it’s been nearly stationary over the central part of Grand Bahama Island while maintaining its Cat 5 status (now downgraded to Cat 4) as of this post.

This is the latest forecast from the NWS National Hurricane Center as of 11 AM on September 2, 2019. Optimistically the forecast track shows Dorian well northwest of its present location in less than 22 hours and by Tuesday morning at 8 AM it could be about 60 to 80 miles further north-northwest from where it is now. The hope is that a broad trough of low pressure now over the central US will start to influence the storm and take it away from a direct strike on the east coast of Florida over the next 2 to 3 days.

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Official position and forecast track of Hurricane Dorian from the National Hurricane Center in Miami, Florida. 11 AM Sep 2.

I would like to see some slight movement of the center to the north or northwest over the next few hours for the forecast track to verify. Here’s hoping!

Chris

At the Zoo – Lion Country Safari, Florida

Lion Country Safari is located in Palm Beach County, Florida. It’s one of the better “drive-thru” safari parks in the US. Here are a few images from a trip back in October 1993.

Camera and Film: Canon F-1 with Canon FD 80-200mm Zoom Lens on Kodak Kodacolor

Scanner: Canon CanoScan 9000F Mark II

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These next two images were taken at the Jacksonville Zoo and Gardens (Florida) in 1999 OR at Busch Gardens, Tampa Bay OR at Lion Country Safari – I’m sorry to say that I didn’t record their origin properly.

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Grévy’s zebra

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The markings on these zebra are amazing – if you look closely it’s actually difficult to distinguish where one animal begins and another ends when they are in a herd.

Here’s a great link to the Jacksonville Zoo and Gardens with some interesting info about these zebras.

Thanks for stopping by! – Chris

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2019 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

Pentamatic Microscope Adapter – 1960

I have yet to use a microscope adapter in nearly 50 years of 35mm photography – but that doesn’t mean that I haven’t collected them and enjoyed the thought of someday using one. I’ve had a few Canon adapters over the years too.

The first step would be actively looking for a microscope to purchase on one of the many online auction sites. Something I will do.

Here’s a nice adapter from Yashica with the Pentamatic bayonet mount. It’s one of the first accessories to appear in the early Pentamatic instruction booklets from 1960. List price was ¥2,500 which was fairly expensive back in the day.

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The adapter mounts directly to the body of the camera – no lens needed.

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A scan from an early Pentamatic sales brochure.

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These instructions are from a later booklet featuring the adapter for the M42 screw mount.

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I believe that the microscope depicted here is a Yashima microscope but it’s not made by Yashica. Yashima was the first name that Yashica went by in the early 1950s.

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Not made by Yashica but still a super cool vintage microscope.

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Typically you’d use a right angle finder such as this one to make it a bit easier to use the adapter on a microscope.

What’s always amazed me is just how many different camera manufacturers made microscope adapters – Canon, Olympus, Nikon just to name a few and how many are still available for purchase online from various auction sites that are unused, still new in their boxes.

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Thanks for stopping by! – Chris

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2019 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

Earth Day 2019 Walkabout – NWF Certified Wildlife Habitat

Carol and I have had our backyard certified by the NWF for many years now – it’s a fun way to get your kids interested in the environment (even if it’s only their own yard) and to foster a respect for our plant in the big picture. All great things start small.

Here’s some images from this morning’s walkabout (4.22.2019) – our little part of the Earth right here in northeast Florida.

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There are over 15 bald cypress trees mixed in with river maples, some oaks, bay trees, and of course, plenty of maidenhair ferns for protective groundcover. There’s a small natural bog and some wetlands too. I’m proud to say that I’ve planted all but 6 trees out of the nearly 60 trees in the yard. Since we moved here in the autumn of 1991 we’ve lived long enough to enjoy the fruits of our labor as most of the cypress trees have grown to be about 40 feet tall.

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One of the many bald cypress trees that inhabit the yard. This one is a “baby” from the first tree that we planted nearly 30 years ago. (see below)

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This bald cypress we brought home from the nursery in the back of our SUV when it was maybe 5 feet tall. It’s now the “daddy or mommy” to most of the other cypress trees in the yard.

We live in a somewhat typical suburban neighborhood with the exception of the backyard has not one blade of grass. No mowing, no lawn maintenance – no chemicals.

Other trees that we’ve planted – Leyland cypress, Japanese black pine, and river birch. All of these do extremely well in the semi-wet environment of our yard and all are native to Florida.

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A young bay tree starting its life amongst the ferns.

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We recently added a wren birdhouse (a gift from our daughter Lindsay) and a family of Carolina wrens have taken up residence. Yeah!

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The sun sculpture on the fence is a favorite of the local anole lizards – they like poking their heads out from the mouth and the sun holds on to some late afternoon sunlight and warmth. Here in the early morning hours, it catches enough sunlight to make it a cozy home.

As the summer wears on, these garden ornaments make a perfect landing spot for dragonflies while patrolling their territory.

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Our crepe myrtle which we purchased through the Arbor Day Foundation (it came as a stick 10 years ago) has grown quite nicely over the years and provides a nice display of dramatic color and texture throughout the year right outside our garden window. The local cardinals and squirrels love the seeds it produces too.

The crepe myrtle in this part of Florida does well without much fuss – it gets all of its water from rainfall and I’ve never fertilized it or use chemicals on insects. The birds and lizards do an excellent job at keeping the bugs in check.

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Marsh rabbit – aka, “Bun-Buns” as Lindsay used to call them.

Other dwellers of the yard – otters (rarely now do we see them), hawks, cardinals, bluebirds, wrens, crows, vultures, marsh rabbits, squirrels, snakes (all types except pythons), lizards, frogs, river cooters (turtles), gopher tortoise, bats, owls, racoon, opossum, armadillo, bobcat (rarely but they do show up), coyotes (only recently), and there was a report of a black bear a few years back. No deer as the yard is way too wet and the woods are a bit dense.

It’s super easy to convert your backyard into a wildlife habitat – just get rid of the grass, plant native trees (a bunch of them), provide some groundcover and water, plant native bushes and flowers and then sit back and enjoy the show. It sure beats mowing and the birds and the bees will thank you each and every day!

Certify your yard with the NWF (go online, it’s easy to do), buy your trees through the National Arbor Day Foundation, shop for native trees and shrubs through local nurseries, add plenty of environmentally friendly rocks (if you’re not blessed with them naturally), mulch to discourage weeds, and share your knowledge with others.

Happy Earth Day y’all! Peace!

Chris

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, are the property of this blog and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2019 Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.