Olympus Superzoom 70 (zoom 2000)

Please take the time to visit Peggy’s site as she’s the best camera hunter I know! If you’re looking for straightforward reviews she’s got them!

Camera Go Camera

This camera from 1993 was a cheap charity shop purchase. I had a feeling I had tried an example before, but checking my camera post list didn’t reveal it. You can find all the technical details you require here and a manual here.

When I first started using film again…and obsessively trying cameras, Olympus was my number one love. They are still up there and I was happy to find this example. It is big and bulky, with a limited aperture selection of f4.5-7.8, but I liked it straight away. The zoom isn’t much to talk about and I ended up leaving it on 38mm for most of the shots. It is comfortable to hold despite the bulk. You can turn the flash off, but it resets once you turn it off and on again. Best of all you have a choice of battery options.

After trying another camera

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single shot Saturday

in balance

Camera – Canon EOS 7D with Canon EF-S 18-135mm f/3.5-5.6 IS STM Macro Zoom Lens

Comments are always welcomed as I’ve learned quite a bit from reader feedback. As always, thanks for stopping by and while you’re at it, feel free to visit my camera shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com (CC Design Studios hosted by Etsy). – Chris Whelan

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, is this blog’s property and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris, Chasing Classic Cameras with Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2021 Chasing Classic Cameras with Chris (Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic), Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

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Leitz Parvo 250 Projector

I’ve recently acquired this Leitz slide projector from a local client of mine. Made in Germany about 1949 it was purchased by her father who was a US Army officer stationed in Germany shortly after the war. As best as I’ve been able to discover, it was made for only one year before a newer model was released. The newer model was known as the Prado 250.

Parvo 250 “Small Screen Projector”.
Shown here with the roll film adapter inserted.
Adapter for showing individual 35mm slides.
With the lens housing removed the body of the projector is marked as the Pravo II.
A super sharp Leitz-Hektor 10cm f/2.5 projection lens.
As simple as simple gets. It uses one 250 watt lamp and no cooling fan. To the right of the bulb is the mirror and to the left is two condenser lenses.
The case is in excellent condition and is unremarkable that there’s no branding anywhere on it. The locks still work and I have both keys.
After seven decades of use, it still looks great (and solid).

There you have it, a brief picture tour of this very interesting slide projector from Leitz. Thanks for stopping by and have a great day! – Chris

Comments are always welcomed as I’ve learned quite a bit from reader feedback. As always, thanks for stopping by and while you’re at it, feel free to visit my camera shop at http://www.ccstudio2380.com (CC Design Studios hosted by Etsy). – Chris Whelan

Please respect that all content, including photos and text, is this blog’s property and its owner, Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic, Yashica Sailor Boy, Yashica Chris, Chasing Classic Cameras with Chris.

Copyright © 2015-2021 Chasing Classic Cameras with Chris (Yashica Pentamatic Fanatic), Chris Whelan
All rights reserved.

Buy Me A Coffee