Pigeon 35 by Shinano Camera Co., Ltd.

Why show a 35 mm viewfinder camera on a blog about the Yashica Pentamatic? Well, Shinano and Yashima-Yashica share a common history. The first camera that carried the Yashima name was the Pigeonflex… a twin-lens reflex (TLR) camera!

Anyway here’s a nice example of a gorgeous 35 mm viewfinder camera that we acquired recently. The lens is made by Tomioka… a sharp (we hope) Tri-Lausar f/ 3.5 4.5 cm lens. NKS shutter B – 1/200.

It’s a nice heavyweight camera that has a good feel to it. In our opinion it’s far from being a cheaply built camera as some would say. In fact, it still functions as intended after 6 decades of use. Most leather cases would be a complete mess after this amount of time but the leather is nice and the stitching is intact.

 

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1952 Pigeon 35 by Shinano.

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Nice view of the Tomioka lens.

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Beautiful logo on this metal cap.

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Classic style. Top plate of the Pigeon 35.

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After 6 decades of use the case has held up nicely.

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Interesting bottom plate

More to come! By the way, everything works just fine! Can’t wait to run a roll of film through it. Images of the leather case to follow too!

 

8 thoughts on “Pigeon 35 by Shinano Camera Co., Ltd.

  1. Nice camera, Chris. I have a Toyoca 35-S camera, with the same lens. I shot a film with it, and the lens is sharp enough, but the corners of the image show vignetting.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hello John… Thank you! I was lucky that the Pigeon turned out to be better than expected. I’ll have to check out the Toyoca 35-S… I didn’t know it had the same lens. That’s interesting to hear about the vignetting… I plan on running a roll through the Pigeon soon. I’ve always liked Tomioka lenses and it will interesting to see how the images turn out. R/ Chris

      Like

  2. It even has the original sachet of dessicant. The camera is a bakelite casting, with aluminium covers. The film wind and shutter cocking aren’t linked – there’s a button on the back to release the film for winding on, after taking a shot.

    Like

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